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what do these terms mean

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by JRuby, Aug 16, 2014.

  1. JRuby

    JRuby St. Helens Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I am questioning what terms like ANIB or LNIB versus used. It is my understanding that you take your new pistol or rifle shooting it is now used. I understand percentages to a greater degree. Are there official rules for grading firearms and their conditions?
     
  2. meowskiz

    meowskiz portland, or Member

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    Just folks saying their bubblegum looks brand new but it's used. It's your call whether or not to agree, but it's generally not debatable
     
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  3. etrain16

    etrain16 Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I've seen several different grading systems - here is one:

    http://www.nramuseum.org/gun-info-research/evaluating-firearms-condition.aspx

    As for private sellers, it's up to you if LNIB really means just that. The only time I've used that term is when I bought a gun new, and changed my mind before I ever shot it. If I shoot it, it's not LNIB to me any longer. I bought a Beretto Nano a while back and after I got it and took it out of the box, realized it wasn't going to work for me. I listed it as LNIB simply because it had been handled (not even stripped). I sold it for $25 less than I paid for it. It actually sold in just 24 hours.
     
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  4. Outrider

    Outrider Oregon Active Member

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    There are different types of grading systems. For modern production stuff, the NRA has a set of terms: New, Excellent, Fine, Very Good, Good, Fair, and Poor. One of the problems with the terms is that the NRA uses the same set for antiques and the terms don't have the same meanings because the context is different.

    I have also seen the percentage grading system used. The problem with that is while there can be consistency with firearms professionals, the vast majority of people don't know how to grade with percentages.

    Both systems can be highly subjective and often unhelpful for the uninitiated. What one person thinks is 80% might seem heavily used to another person. The Blue Book of Gun Values lists a conversion chart from one system to the other, but the usefulness is debatable when "Good" condition from the NRA system can cover anything from 60% to 80% on the percentage system.

    ANIB (Almost New In Box), LNIB (Like New In Box), etc. are commonly used terms in areas outside of firearms. While there is still the problem of subjectivity, most people know what is meant. The person bought it, maybe fired it a little, but otherwise looks pretty clean and is in excellent mechanical condition.

    The grading systems predate the internet. With the widespread use of digital photos, one could argue that the buyers can find out a lot of what they want to know from the pictures. If the seller writes a description pointing out additional wear that does not show up in the pictures that is more useful than a simple estimate, i.e. Very Good / 90%.
     
  5. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Definition of 'Perceived Value'

    The worth that a product or service has in the mind of the consumer. The consumer's perceived value of a good or service affects the price that he or she is willing to pay for it.
    For the most part, consumers are unaware of the true cost of production for the products they buy. Instead, they simply have an internal feeling for how much certain products are worth to them. Thus, in order to obtain a higher price for their products, producers may pursue marketing strategies to create a higher perceived value for their products.
     
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  6. JRuby

    JRuby St. Helens Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Could I assume that LNIB means that there is no perceivable difference between new and LNIB with the exception that it was sold at one time to a private citizen.
     
  7. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    It was my understanding that ANIB box meant "as new in box" meaning the gun was new. LNIB being "like new in box" used more more items that are like new old stock. The item may have been handled or even purchased, but has not been fired outside the factory and there are no handling marks.

    Either way, I tell my customers that the moment they buy a gun from me and leave the store, it is used. Unless I get a gun from a distributor, I sell it as used. I choose not to use the above terms. Its either new or used. Just my $.02
     
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  8. Joe13

    Joe13 NW of Vancouver Opinionated & Blunt Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    :confused:BNIB. Only 100 shots fired...
     
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  9. Doc In UPlace

    Doc In UPlace Tacoma-ish Well-Known Member

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    More useful to me is a description which includes some data such as, "handled, never fired" or "never carried, fewer than 50 rounds fired" and so on.
    Similarly with knives, "never carried, safe queen, no handling marks, never sharpened" etc.
     
  10. Qaolin

    Qaolin 1 A.U. from a G2 near Beaverton Old Army Cook Silver Supporter

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    The first mile on a new car makes it a used car.
    The first time you remove anything else from the box makes it used.
    If I'm not the first one to put fingerprints on the gun, it's a used gun no matter how shiny.


    These are my rules, I make them up. :cool:
     
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  11. CarlMc

    CarlMc Safely north of Seattle Active Member

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    As soon as you sign on the dotted line it's a used car.
     
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  12. CarlMc

    CarlMc Safely north of Seattle Active Member

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    Is there a "French" rating? Never been shot and only dropped once? :)

    Sorry, I couldn't resist!
     
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  13. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Yes, and the same holds true for most sellers. Both are very subjective!
     
  14. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    and slight holster wear.
     
  15. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    With a firearm as soon as the original transaction at the FFL's where its purchased new is completed it is in fact a USED GUN,

    now you can call the condition of that used gun anything you want but its still a USED gun.

    and to prove this you can legally sell it with out holding a FFL and if it was new the law would require you to have a FFL or be the agent of an FFL to sell it.
     
  16. Doc In UPlace

    Doc In UPlace Tacoma-ish Well-Known Member

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    In that case then Washington State is on the brink of having a whole bunch of "new" guns if I-594 passes.:(
     
  17. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    OK the only NIB is from a FFL
    ANIB and LNIB are pretty much the same,the gun was taken from the showroom and either brought back to ffl to sell or at private sale.
    Could have been fired a couple times but not a full mag (my stipulation for selling a used gun,function test)
    Any gun,fired or not,that leaves the show room and is then up for sale is USED.
     
  18. Just Jim

    Just Jim Well-Known Member

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    My friend says it best, " what ever your price is it ain't worth that much until I own it".:D
     
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  19. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    All that matters, to me, is if the gent/entity says NIB/"new".. that means that it most assuredly better be pristine and never shot past the factory.. it should be perfect in all regards
    It is way too common though that I see (and I rarely look at guns and more rarer, buy one) the "best" gunshops selling/positing a gun as new when it's plain to see that perhaps the boys were let to have their way with it on a weekend or so. fairly laughable and quite improper and plain to see
     
  20. Gunguy45

    Gunguy45 Well-Known Member

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    The gun is worth EXACTLY (to the penny no less) what you're willing to pay for it.

    Frankly, if you're new to guns I would advise you to stick with a dealer with a very good rep. You don't know what to look for in a used gun and the $75 or $100 you save can turn and bite you with a gun that's unsafe, unreliable or just plain worn out. (Completely smooth-bore .22 revolvers anyone? *I* have certainly seen these worthless pieces of history sold as serviceable guns in certain venues).

    Do you even KNOW how to check for bore wear?

    Are you familiar with the term headspace and how to check it?

    If you answered NO to either of these questions DO NOT buy a used gun from someone who won't stand behind it.

    If I sell you a rifle or pistol I THINK is in good condition but breaks after 500 rounds, I'll take the gun and give you your money back with profuse apologies. Do that with most complete strangers and they'll be asking for your name...Over and Over, and Over.... well, you get the picture.

    Caveat Emptor. Especially with used guns. It's not a market for novices. And LNIB means: "I shot it." One round or 10,000. Take your guess.)

    30 years ago I would have given you different advice. But these days, so many jackwads are trying to make a buck on guns that unless you have a very knowledgeable friend with you, I'd pass on the used guns unless you really know your guns, which means you would have never posted the question.

    Buy from a local dealer with a standup reputation. A $300 gun that's a worthless piece of trash is a lot worse deal than you could have made for $500 for a gun that would last you a lifetime.