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Which one ?

  • Springfield Hellcat Pro

    Votes: 11 36.7%
  • Walther PDP

    Votes: 14 46.7%
  • Beretta APX A1

    Votes: 5 16.7%

  • Total voters
    30
Messages
134
Reactions
237
I'm looking to pick up a handgun that will be primarily nightstand gun, but also sometimes conceal carry in a winter jacket. I'm looking for guns that are accurate, have good reviews, and good recoil control. The ones I have it narrowed down to are:
Springfield Hellcat Pro
Walther PDP
Beretta APX A1

feel free to suggest others like these.
 
Have you ever shot any of those? Every at least been able to handle one?
If the answer is no? This is a VERY poor way to choose. If several people like one of them and so you go buy one what happens if you find you do not like it? Now you are stuck with a gun you want to trade.
So assuming you have learned to shoot already? Find a range with rentals. Its FAR cheaper to rent something and see if you like it rather than buy it first.
If you have tried these guns, and you like them? By all means get what works for you.
 
the only range near me is threat dynamics and they have none of these for rental. so that's not an option
 
You need to shoot guns to find out if they are good for you. Everyone has different hands, and this will drastically effect which guns will work best for you. Take me for example, I have short fingers and big palms. This means certain popular designs, like the 1911, simply do not work well for me. I found a brand and setup I like, but I have talked to people for whom that brand and setup simply does not work. That does not mean they are wrong, or have a poor opinion, or do not know what they are talking about, it simply means that they have different needs than I do (at least as far as ergonomics and use case are concerned).

I would recommend going out to a range that does gun rentals and try out the ones that you think will fit you best. Or better yet find a friend that has an example that you can try out. This will server you far better than trying to figure out what will work based on pictures and random recommendations from the internet. What works for you is highly personal; there simply is no substitute for trying it out for yourself. Preferably before you buy.
 
the only range near me is threat dynamics and they have none of these for rental. so that's not an option
Invest a little time, and go to The Place To Shoot, at Jantzen Beach, or wander across the river to Safe Fire in Vancouver.
This will not be time spent, but time invested.
As far as a gun recommendation, I am rather partial to the Beretta 92 Centurion with the "G"
decocker.
Best,
Gary
 
It is very, very difficult to beat a Glock, any Glock, when it comes to reliability, functionality, and self-defense worthy accuracy. For carry as you've described I'd recommend the 17.
 
Another vote for investing some time and travel to check out the pistols in question , in person.

Otherwise all you will get is a pistol that someone else likes and uses well....
And possibly one that find you dislike and don't use well.

Case in point...
My answer to your question of which would you choose ...
Would be none of the listed handguns...
I like and would suggest a 1911A1 pistol.
However....
You already have one...stated that you don't like it...and have it for sale in the classified section.

So...
Asking what someone likes can be iffy at best....because what they like may be worlds apart with what you like.
Andy
 
A good place to look at and handle lots of guns is a gun show. I see one in McMinville or Redmond this weekend. Heck you might be able to trade your 1911 in on what you really, really want.
 
Another vote for investing some time and travel to check out the pistols in question , in person.

Otherwise all you will get is a pistol that someone else likes and uses well....
And possibly one that find you dislike and don't use well.

Case in point...
My answer to your question of which would you choose ...
Would be none of the listed handguns...
I like and would suggest a 1911A1 pistol.
However....
You already have one...stated that you don't like it...and have it for sale in the classified section.

So...
Asking what someone likes can be iffy at best....because what they like may be worlds apart with what you like.
Andy
In my experience, you really should , if at all possible, shoot a handgun before purchase.
I have a 645 S&W that I shoot quite well. I have it's smaller sibling, a S&W 5906. I have had folks at the club shoot the 5906, and it shoots lights out.
But, I, have never been able to shoot it well.
☹️☹️
 
I personally am not a Glock guy. Great guns, bad fit for me. Clearly I am not the norm in this. I would lean towards a Beretta if it were me. I tend to, in general feel more at home on most Berettas, however that is me. In my opinion if it is recoil you are concerned about, the heavier the better. More weight, generally has less flip and less felt recoil.
 
I'm looking to pick up a handgun that will be primarily nightstand gun, but also sometimes conceal carry in a winter jacket. I'm looking for guns that are accurate, have good reviews, and good recoil control. The ones I have it narrowed down to are:
Springfield Hellcat Pro
Walther PDP
Beretta APX A1

feel free to suggest others like these.
For concealed carry "in a winter jacket" --assuming you mean in the pocket of a winter jacket, you are talking about a fairly small gun. It will be hard to shoot and he!l to learn on. For a home defense handgun the ideal would be a full size gun you can shoot much better than the dinky little guns, and that would be better to learn on. And it might be an AR or shotgun, not a handgun at all.

You are asking the sort of questions typical of someone who has never shot a gun, maybe handled very few even in a gun shop. Basically, people here are telling you this isn't how to choose a gun. And reviews don't mean much if the reviewer has a deal with a gun shop and is borrowing guns for free. He is likely to get only specially checked guns, not typical over the counter guns. And/or will get his special deal with the gun shop canceled if he says bad things about the guns. Any magazine that advertises guns will not be running objective truthful reviews on guns. Just like garden mags don't have any articles on the liabilities of using rototillers; not when rototiller manufacturers are their major advertisers.

You are thinking of guns like household hammers. Anyone can use it, one size fits all. Think of a gun more like a pair of trousers. Its gotta fit you. Your handspan, finger length, thickness of hand all matter. Even many experienced shooters can't shoot small and/or light guns well.

Start by taking a gun course. One that lets you try several guns. And that will fill the requirements for getting your concealed permit.

Go to several different gun ranges that rent guns and try everything they have in 9mm and .357 mag/.38sp. Those are the most popular semiauto and revolver calibers respectively, and the ones with the most different guns and most affordable practice ammo. . In the latter start with .38sp wadcutters, not .357 mag. Usually the guns available for rental will be among the popular guns that are also accurate, reliable, and sturdy. Otherwise they wouldn't get used as rental guns.

After you have found one or more guns you like to shoot, check here about those particular guns.
 
Last Edited:
Just my $,02, like others said, try to shoot or at least fondle (which includes seeing if the slide locks back easily for you, the controls are in good places, the trigger is to your liking, it fits in your hand and has a good natural point of aim. Also consider additional costs like how expensive are their magazines and are holsters easily available (like plenty of holster options, not just a few).

Not that there is anything wrong with any of these three guns, but how did you pick these three? I ask because they are definitely not the most commonly picked options. Honestly, I don't see these in many classes. Here are a few observations.

Walther PDP: Good gun, options can a little harder to find, sometimes a bit more costly and holster options will likely need to be ordered. Had two shooters with the PDP-F in class recently (and my bride has one), and they all shot well. Known for their ergos being comfortable.

Hellcat Pro: Another in the long line of, "Let's make a small gun, then make it bigger, and bigger..." I've found people without strong grip strength can have issues racking and locking slides back on the Hellcat series because their slide serrations are more suggestions than useful. The smaller ones tend to be snappy but since the pro holds the equivalent to a G17 mag of ammo, this will add to the weight, and the carry weight.

Beretta APX A1: These exist in the wild? I ask because I think I have seen one. Unlike the Hellcat, they have seriously grippy slide serrations. I presume you are looking at the compact as the full size is, well full size. But both are similar. Holsters are unlikely to be off the shelf and more limited and mags will be harder to find but available online (and at a pretty reasonable price). The one I remember from a class ran well and the shooter liked it.

So now you have additional ramblings from a random dude on the interwebs. Good luck with your quest, and in the words of the knight guarding the Grail, "Choose wisely." :)
 
Looking at your other posts; you don't like 1911's and want to buy an M9. That tells me you have large hands. I also have large hands. Many of the carry guns that are extremely popular are uncomfortable for me to draw and fire, so I have drifted larger.

If this was a range toy purchase I'd say buy a few. For a serious defensive use though; definitely try some out. Also look at holster availability before you buy the gun.
 
This thread made me think of something the Wife unit told me before I left for work. She was at a local shop picking up a new gun. Place was BUSY. Some guy trots up to counter and when one of the staff asks to help the guy giggles and says " what gun should I buy for around the house that is less than $500". Wife said she could see the poor counter guy thinking he should have called in sick.:D
 
I'd also suggest sticking to the most popular guns, and those with plenty of after market sights, grips, and holster options. Even experienced gun people often have to buy and try three or more holsters for each gun they buy before finding one that works for them. Its way more workable if those holsters cost $10 to $40 each instead of needing to be custom made at more than$100 each.
 
all these answers and nobody answered the question 😒 can yall just tell me which of those 3 you like the best and why. I'm asking for a comparison here.
 

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