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Most have likely heard the question of what advice you would give to a younger version of oneself. A spin on the old inquiry: what gun advice would you give a younger you? A path that should have been taken, misstep to have avoided, something to have gotten into earlier, or anything else?

Enjoy. :)
 
Most have likely heard the question of what advice you would give to a younger version of oneself. A spin on the old inquiry: what gun advice would you give a younger you? A path that should have been taken, misstep to have avoided, something to have gotten into earlier, or anything else?

Enjoy. :)
This may sound weird but nothing, no advice at all. If I hadn't experienced pieces of sheot when I was young I would never have learned to avoid anything even remotely unreliable like the plague. Because of the lessons from the early cheap garbage guns every gun has been a joy ever since and I'm very thankful for that.
 
Point #1: Aside from .22 cal, pick two pistol calibers and stick with them. I chose 9mm and 45acp. And I don't even have all the guns in 9 and 45 I want, and I struggle to keep them fed. I can't imagine what it would be like if I was also stocking .40's, .38/357, etc.

Note that this doesn't mean you can't have an odd caliber or two...like, say, .38/357. But these are regarded strictly as range toys and I don't stock ammo for it.

Point #2: Stock ammo high and deep. Because one day there will be a massive shortage. And then there will be another massive shortage...measured in years.
 
Don't buy so many. Put that money in the stock market instead. Buy just a few and enjoy in moderation.

Don't spend so much time tinkering with guns. Spend that time developing a career, skills, or business instead. By doing these things, maybe someday you can afford to retire, instead of just having a big safe full of useless guns you don't use.

Dead serious, this is exactly the gun-related advice I would give my younger self, along with smacking myself up the side of the head and telling me to not be so stupid.
 
Let's see.....

#1. Momma's car window sitting out in sub zero temps for days does not make a good target for your Red Rider. No matter how far away it may appear.

#2. When playing BB gun tag and confronted with, "surrender or die!?"... there is no dishonor or stain on your boyhood in choosing "surrender"... at least on occasion.

Not exclusive to guns, but there is some cross over.

#3. Pappa's belt sessions are not mere punishments for specific deeds in that single moment, but are meant to be long term reminders... when you feel your curiosity may start getting the best of you, again.

Other than that, I'm pretty happy with my firearm upbringing and can't think of much I wish I could go back and change.
 
I don't know what I'd say.
On one hand, a few of the guns I'd sold off have become more valuable than I would have imagined if I'd have kept them. But I sold them for a reason, even when they were less valuable.

When I started carrying I had two guns that I would alternate between. A 1911 and a J-Frame.
These days I alternate between two guns, mostly. A 1911 and a J-Frame. Not the same guns, but it's ironic that's what I've settled on after a little over 30 years of carrying concealed.

I could have saved myself from all of that shooting, buying and selling. But what fun would that be?
 
Hearing protection is important.
Crickets and bagpipes all day long, babee!
But hey, probably builds character and there are probably worse things so I'm not complaining.
 
Buy a suppressor as soon as you are able to, it will enhance your shooting experience, save your hearing, don't wait!
Stack your ammo and reloading components deep when deals can be had, there will always be an inconvenient and expensive shortage of these items!

Also, it is very expensive to buy cheap guns/optics/gear!
 
Don't sell anything uncommon. You won't be able to replace it someday. If it was made or imported by the millions and has no sentimental value, sell it to improve your collection.

Bruce
 
Starting from childhood:
1. Ask Grandpa to specifically will me his old AF .45 and keep it locked in the safe where Uncle Drunk couldn't swipe it to hock for rotgut.
2. Put in a request with Uncle Frank to be the custodian of his old bringback Garand and Carbine.
3. Less roadtripping with the guys in college, more milsurps from the Big 5 barrels.
4. Get that Thompson before I-594!
 
Buy those Russian guns while they're cheap. Eventually you'll learn to appreciate them. Also a milsurp Garand or three. And a machine gun before the registry closes. Guess that first new car you ever bought may get pushed out a few years.
 

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