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Moving from Eugene to Bend..What to consider?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by InformedCitizen, Mar 18, 2011.

  1. InformedCitizen

    InformedCitizen Eugene New Member

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    I am considering moving from Eugene to Bend. I would like to know the pitfalls and concerns of living in Bend one should be aware of. I am more concerned about the preparedness/survival aspects then the financial or recreational aspects. Although if you have insight into other areas one may overlook I would like to hear those as well.

    One thing that attracts me to Bend is the hot summers and cold cold winters. This naturally poses a problem, while I think its not a deal breaker. Any insight into this?

    A pitfall I see is the lack of rainfall in Bend. This obviously poses problems in regards to gardening and water(rainfall) collection. (wiki - Annual precipitation averages 11.7 in (300 mm), which partially comes as the average snowfall of 27.6 inches (70.1 cm)). Also, (wiki - Bend's growing season is quite short due to a brief frost-free period.).

    Another aspect that I am having a hard time finding information on would be the natural disaster aspect. While Bend has an extinct volcano within its city limits, given that it is extinct I am not too worried about it.

    How would you guys rate Bend in regards to a preparedness/survival? What considerations should one take before considering a move to Bend? What important information would you like to know before making the move? Thanks!
     
  2. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    There are many bits of information that need to be filled in before I could offer any help. When you say "Moving to Bend" are you going to live inside the city limits? On acreage? North south east west? It makes a big difference since Bend is right on the edge of the pine forest (west) and the high desert (east) South is higher altitude and more timbered, while North is lower and more open. In any survival scenario water is going to be the big requirement. If you home does not have a well of its own you will be dependent on a utility. You are correct about the chances of collecting rain water, as in the summer it is rare. Depending on where you live a well will be from 100 to 500ft. I live northeast of Bend about 25 miles and my well is 580ft., but the water is excellent and the aquifer is secure from surface contamination as it is beneath solid basalt. You will find many prepared folks over here, and limitless (almost) opportunities for outdoor fun. Gardening is nearly impossible for all but root crops as we only have an average of about 120 frost free days. In fact I have about an inch of snow on the ground from a squall that went through this afternoon. Hope this helps.
     
  3. InformedCitizen

    InformedCitizen Eugene New Member

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    Extremely helpful actually. I am looking at acreage (3-10) on the outskirts of town. What have you done to prepare that differs from other given the climate you are in?
     
  4. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I have a gen set for my house which can provide enough power to run the well pump as well as all other needs, and a buried cistern, (2500 gal) I can fill if I get low of fuel for the generator. I use a pellet stove for heat. It can run with very low power requirements and I can heat the house (1980 sq ft) for $340.00 per year. Since you are moving to a desert, water is the prime critical commodity. I am researching a human powered generator, to ensure I can get water. If things go really bad, being able to trade water for other things I need is a avenue I want open to me.
     
  5. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    I would also look at the blast path for hood. From my very unedumacted perspective, and based on just looking at stuff, I would say hood will probably blow to south/south west. I would also say drought and fire should be a concern. With the short growing season, you can always build a green house of some sort and use cold tolerant plants for the garden. Last thing I could see being a problem is running out of varmint ammo ;)
     
  6. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Valid points....but Hood is far enough away to eliminate any direct blast danger, even if it went twice as far as St. Helens. Prevailing winds would generally push the plume to the valley, take a deep breath Sandy, or to the east, although we would doubtless get a good load. A green house is one thing I have looked into, but a garden will require a TALL fence, unless you want a little venison with your carrots. I often wake up and look out at 15-20 deer bedded down within 50 feet of the house. They have learned the cougars don't come near houses usually!! Varmit ammo is another matter, have plenty loaded for both types.
     
  7. A.I.P.

    A.I.P. UpperUS Active Member

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    Water, water water, you can build green houses, you can store fuel for winter but you can't make it rain
     
  8. wwkii

    wwkii gilchrist oregon Active Member

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    are you dead set on living in or around bend because i think its lousy in respect to the type of people many are from california . as for central oregon i think its a great place for survival . since you are not near the valley if shtf over there you have alot of traffic and people to deal with . i meen lots of compatitin for food gas etc . i live near gilchrist that is about 40 miles south of bend its a very rural area, more trees , the ground is not as rocky and the water table is very shallow the well on both houses is onlk 39 ft and the water is great . dear and elk are plentiful right out my door . you can take back roads and never touch pavement clear to eastern oregon if you wanted. i know it sounds like a sales pitch and it kind of is since ive got a really cool house cabin for sale on an acre 9 miles ffom lapine and 9 miles from gilchrist if your interested im asking 79000 for it
     
  9. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    From a preparedness standpoint, life in Bend is and would be easier on the outskirts or surrounding communities. Surface water is more abundant towards the mountains, but so are the wildfires. If you plan on living that direction, make sure you have plenty of defendable space around your house (open ground with no fire fuel source). Water storage should be a priority, whether that be a cistern, well, or just a few 50 gallon drums properly stored and treated. Gardening can be done, but is best done in a controlled environment (see greenhouse or hydroponic). If you enjoy shooting, there are plenty of opportunities and places to practice, but be advised, its all outdoors. There are no indoor ranges. There are several gunshops in the area, as well as a Wholesale Sports and other big box stores (WalMart, BiMart, etc.) to purchase guns, ammo, and other gear.

    When you get to the area, I suggest learning the backroads. You can drive from the South end of Bend all the way to the Fort Rock/Christmas Valley area without hitting paved roads. Any other information you want, just ask. There are plenty of us on the forum over here...
     
  10. mjn

    mjn Tri-Cities, Wa Active Member

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    With all due respect... holy crap people... How much time do you spend thinking about SHTF scenarios?

    Live life.. We're only here for awhile anyway.. Do what you can to make a difference, prepare to a certain extent for sure.. but damn..

    The Bend area is a fantastic place. I'd live there if I could. There is absolutely nothing better than the smell of sage and junipers after the rain.

    Get a job, store up some ammo.. plant a garden, and call it a day. All the planning in the world can be blown to crap in an instant anyway.

    Enjoy life dammit.
     
  11. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    With all due respect, SHTF scenarios can mean different things to different people. I have been evacuated several times living in the Central Oregon area due to wildfires. Many more times I've hosted friends who were displaced. When it happens, it sure feels like the S is hitting the fan. Prior planning prevents piss poor performance...

    We do live life. Part of some of us living life is to think and plan for the future. It is not always dwelt on, however, spending a few hours a week tending a garden, working on water storage (ever lived without plumbing or power for more than an hour? Stored water helps...), or other things to help us survive difficult times is a worthwhile endeavor.

    The Bend area is fantastic. I work very hard to be able to live here. I have made sacrifices (it's not a cheap place) in my career and my living arrangements to live here. Not complaining, just saying. Its an expensive town. Funny how it was built on blue collar mills and even the old log decks are now high end shopping areas. But its home and its a great place. Any one who can move here that's not a flaming liberal, I'm all for it.

    So to summarize my response to your post. I have a job. I'd like to store up more ammo, but I shoot too often and cannot afford 1000's of rounds at a time. So the small amount I have squirreled away for emergencies (like ammo shortages) will have to suffice. I have a small garden, although its not as big or complete as I'd like. If all my planning is "blown away in an instant," it was worth it while it was there. And heck, there's always plan B. Not sure what it is, but I enjoy life while I'm figuring it out.

    To close. It's never a bad idea to take into account things that can have a very real effect on where you live. Some people call these events SHTF. Others simply refer to them as natural disasters, civil unrest, war, etc. All have happened in our countries brief history, and will more than likely happen again. It's not a bad idea to consider the best to have you and your family survive them when you move to a new area...
     
  12. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Actually I think about SHTF scenarios daily...I guess it is a matter of perspective and scale. Everything from "What if a deer jumps out of the trees along here", and, "What if the downwind engine dies on this crosswind takeoff before reaching Vmc?", to "OK that bulge on the South Sister just let go." That doesn't mean I dwell on doom and gloom, rather I enjoy life more feeling I am prepared for whatever comes along. You don't have to live under a paranoid cloud, just ensure you have done all you can to ensure your family is prepared to meet a crises. Obviously there are things your personal resources can't prepare you for. If a dirty bomb goes off next to me in traffic in some big city I'm screwed, but I have been certain I will die at some point in the future for many years, I just want to spend as much of my kid's inheritance as I can before that time.
     
  13. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    And at least we get to live in Central Oregon while while waiting for it all. Its almost impossible not to enjoy this place...
     
  14. speelyei

    speelyei Willamette Valley Active Member

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    "SHTF" for me is another valley winter. Another winter of 36 degree rain, slimy trees, soaking wet sweatshirts and soggy socks. Another winter of leaving for work in the dark, and getting home in the dark and 10 am looks just like 2 pm. Another winter of feeding brush into the chipper with a sinus headache and fogged up safety glasses. Another winter of rainy Saturdays watching the rain drip off the eaves and blustery Sundays where I wake up dreading Monday. Another winter where I wear raingear all day, every day, and wear rubber boots when I'm not climbing. Good on ya for moving out where it's dry. Wish I could do the same.

    Somebody hand me a tissue, I'm gonna go watch "Bridget Jones Diary"...
     
    ATCclears and (deleted member) like this.
  15. salmonriverjohn

    salmonriverjohn N.W Oregon coast, Gods country Well-Known Member

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    MA duce lives in god's country period. Any place is better than Eugene anyway. I love the coast, but have to say that I would trade for Ma's area and to the east of there (Ukiah,Heppner) any day. But there's this fiftytwo year old problem that always seems to stop me from heading that way, she and I share the same last name, and her roots are where the sea is,, dang it.
     
  16. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I feel your pain...I grew up on the west side and lived there until I went into the service. When I got to the point in my life I could choose where I wanted to live the choice was easy. Don't want to rub it in...but from my front deck I can see from Hood to Newberry Crater.....Of course from the hottub it is only from Jefferson to Bachelor....:woot:
     
  17. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    I too grew up in Purgatory, err... the valley. I've since lived in Colorado, Vermont, Alaska, and other places. I always come back to Central Oregon.
     
  18. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    I have lived here since the city limit sign in Bend said 12,500. Bend and Central Oregon in general is still a great place to live but the attitude and people have changed dramatically - mostly due to influence from directly south. People left Cali because they wanted a better way of life only to recreate here what they left behind. Fortunately the economic situation and the dramatic drop in California's housing prices have brought a screeching halt to the mass exodus of those selling for incredible amounts and moving up here. It used to be common to meet people (sometimes several a week) who have done so but now it is rare. Recently a local spokesman said on a radio talk show, "Central Oregon has invested in the California transplants for the past 20 years" With any luck though those conditions will never return and maybe CO will calm down and return to a somewhat slower pace of life.
     
  19. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    You are correct in the change of character in Bend. I moved here in 1978, and out of Bend four years later. You have to admit hat it IS fun to watch Greenwood and 3rd after the first snow.............
     
  20. RVTECH

    RVTECH LaPine Well-Known Member

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    No doubt - really though the line on the population graph did not go vertical until about the time the Parkway was finished. (someone correct me but I believe it was officially finished in 2002). Then it was like stomping on the ground near an anthill. I believe Bend was only around the 50 k mark than.