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Guns are an investment, not an expense.

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by KCB, Oct 31, 2012.

  1. KCB

    KCB Hillsboro Active Member

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    It amazes me how many times I hear people say that they are going to buy a new gun when they "sell this", "Save that", "Get permission", "Can hide it from the wife" ect. ect...... People need to wake up or simply do some research on the increase in value of fireams, ammunition, and magazines (especially in the last decade or two). I'm sure many around here understand this fundamental. Its amazing how many people just dont get it that even if only to preserve wealth in a fiat-based currency system, buying any gun is a good investment. I won't even get into the unmeasurable benefits to having guns in a SHTF senerio are.. Rant over haha.
     
  2. Chalupacabra

    Chalupacabra Portland Active Member

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    But, If you have to part ways, google "break-up advice for teens" and apply it to your situation.
    For example:
    "Don't be afraid to cry. Going through a break-up can be really tough, and getting some of those raw emotions out can be a big help. We know this is another tough one for guys, but there's no shame in crying now and then. No one has to see you do it — you don't have to start blubbering in class or at soccer practice or anything. Just a find a place where you can be alone, like crying into your pillow at night or in the shower when you're getting ready for the day."
    I miss my first ccw more than I miss what's-her-name.
     
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  3. DieselScout

    DieselScout S Clackamas County Well-Known Member

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    The problem is, calling it an investment means at some point I plan on getting rid of it, which is not true. :D
     
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  4. BillyDa59

    BillyDa59 King County, WA Member

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    The only problem I see with recognizing guns as an investment is with new guns. I think most anybody would be hard pressed to get their initial investment back out of a new firearm. Even if waiting 10-20 years. That being said, an overwhelming majority of my guns are used and I think I might be able to make a slight profit off them with a bit of luck.
     
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  5. RMD

    RMD Keizer, Or Member

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    I don't know if I have seen any real increase in the value of my guns. But I can say that guns are about the only thing I spend money on that does down fast if at all.

    Go buy a new high end cell phone and in 6 months its worthless.
     
  6. KCB

    KCB Hillsboro Active Member

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    I bought my first new ruger 10/22 stainless when I was 12years old (saved for a few months) for $169.00. I am 31 years old. How much will one of those cost you today? I also have 10 unopened spam cans of 5.45x39 (1080rnds each) I bought for $100 a piece 8 years ago. Those will cost you $169 plus shipping for some of rhe best deals today.
     
  7. Nwcid

    Nwcid Yakima and N of Spokane Well-Known Member

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    You also have to remember that not all people make the same amount of money. When SKS's were $90 each I was 18 years old and had no money. I knew I should have bought a few cases of them then, but no way to do it when I had other things to pay for. You have to have the money to invest in the first place.

    When SKS ammo was $80/1000 shipped I had some money to play with. I did buy cases of it and other ammo as I saw the prices going sky high.

    One of the guys in my dive club always seems very envious whenever I get a new item. I know him and his wife own a home and have low paying jobs. I am single with no major bills and make over 2x the median average income for my area so I can afford toys.
     
  8. Burt Gummer

    Burt Gummer Portland Completely Out of Ammo

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    Buying? - Everything out there is a precious gem and you should be so lucky to have the chance to own it.

    Selling? - What you have is available for less from somewhere else, is junk, or will you trade for a waterbed?


    Better to buy quality, something you want to keep for life, and never think of it as an investment or something to sell later. Of course, easier said than done.
     
  9. AMT

    AMT Vancouver, WA. Gold Supporter Gold Supporter

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    Everything has gone up with the cost of living. Income(s), the price of gas, a loaf of bread, etc. Everything. Price compare your purchases (missed purchases) of 10-15 years ago. I'd guess that everything has risen the same percentage - with very few execptions like gold, silver, etc.
     
  10. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Then you haven't collected firearms very long.

    Rifles I bought in the mid 1980's are currently selling used for twice what I paid for them easily.

    And example a Remington 572 pump .22 sold new for under $200.00 when I bought one in the late 1980's They currently have a MSRP: $681.55 and are selling at on line discount dealers for $572.00 at Buds. Used at recent shows I have seen really nice ones for near $450.00. And they were used not like new in the box. Which is how a firearm being used as an investment should be kept.

    I would say thats a pretty good investment.

    In 1967 a Ruger Bearcat sold new for $37.50 I just bought a 1967 Ruger Bearcat with all paper work etc. in about 95% condition so as close to new as a used pistol can be expected to be in after 45 years. I paid $495.00 and thought I got a STEAL as they typically fetch upwards of $575 on the on line auctions in this condition.

    $37.50 x 45 years = (lets round it off an say $500.00)
     
  11. deen_ad

    deen_ad Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    But: your 2012 dollar is worth 50% less than is was in 1980!
     
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  12. 22many

    22many PNW Well-Known Member

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    I think it depends on the guns. My DW 1911 i bought new for $860. 6 months later prices shot way up and now the same gun is close to $1500. Alot of the AKs are the same way. There cheap when their on the market but after parts kits dries up then price goes way up. Case in point is the century milled polish AKs. They were $569 a year ago now their close to $800.

    The poly pistols never seem to go up on price. In fact, trying to get $400 out of my xd40 subcompact with box, gear, and papers took me 3 months to sell.
     
  13. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

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    That's only because you were selling an xd40

    If it were a glock 19, 20, or 21, it would have sold much quicker and likely for a profit.
     
  14. coctailer

    coctailer Portland, OR/Hastings, MI/Vancouver,WA I run with scissors.

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    Glocks sell here on the forum all the time for more than they cost new.:bluelaugh:
     
  15. WhyteCheddar

    WhyteCheddar East of Moscow by the Willamette Well-Known Member

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    Having sold and bought a few glocks here and currently shopping for another, j can say I have seen few if any used examples selling for new prices.
    I have seen some asking prices up there a bit, but fairly rare.
     
  16. MrNiceGuy

    MrNiceGuy between springfield and shelbyville Well-Known Member

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    I'm amazed that you could be so oblivious as to link an inability to afford or a marital disagreement to a perceived ignorance of gun values.

    More guns is great, but it's not worth missing a rent payment or getting a divorce.
     
  17. Key-Hay

    Key-Hay North Carolina Active Member

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    I bought a Glock 21 back in 1993 and paid around $500 for it. Sold it later for a lot less. Last time I checked 21s were still going for around $500.

    Now my Gibson Les Paul I paid $1,500 for in 2000 I could sell for $2000. They go for $2600 new.
     
  18. Burt Gummer

    Burt Gummer Portland Completely Out of Ammo

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    Not specific to firearms, it is just reality that a lot of men are henpecked. Not complicated.
     
  19. Burt Gummer

    Burt Gummer Portland Completely Out of Ammo

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    Then you are just breaking even. The slow and gradual death of the dollar is not your friend. Money printing out of thin air is the cruelest tax of all.

    On the other hand, silver was under $5 an ounce average cost in 2000 and now worth 6x+ that - (thank you Peter Schiff!) Of course, you have the enjoyment in ownership of your guitar vs a hunk of metal so that is something.

    Capture.JPG

    From WeaponsMan.com - tips on weapons/ammo purchases:


    Don't buy anything you can't or won't ultimately sell. In other words, this is not an excuse for blowing money on your collection, unless you have a very hard-eyed view of your collection and are willing to sacrifice the pieces in it for food, fuel and shelter in the years ahead.

    Don't buy junk. Quality anything appreciates more than junk. Junk just becomes old junk.

    Don't buy very high-end stuff. While it appreciates more in good times and often holds value in hard times, its sheer cost means that the buyer pool is small, and the time it takes for the market to clear is long. This is a major departure from what the author of the ZH post suggests in some of his other numbered suggestions: Patek Phillippe watches, for example. The reason is, in a sustained economic crisis the number of high-end watch (or firearm) sellers will temporarily expand, and the number of buyers will temporarily contract.

    Do buy leading names, in mindshare terms. Pass up the no-name .22 and spend more for Ruger 10/22s. Pass up the Brand X shotgun and lay in Remington 870s

    Do buy common calibers. The barter value of a Remington 700 in the excellent 7mm/08 caliber is going to be lower than the same gun in .308. To get someone to take the 7mm/08 you'd have to throw in enough ammo to make him comfortable with it. Rimfires in .22 LR only. Shotguns in 12 Gauge.

    Do buy guns that can fire US military ammunition. This, and .22 and 12-gauge, may be the only ammo available for years or decades in an extended economic crisis. There might be 10,000 reasons that .40 is better than 9mm in a pistol. Doesn't matter if there's no .40 to be had.

    Do buy stuff that can be subdivided. And this basically means ammo. In early colonial times, gold coins often held more value than needed for a transaction and they would have to be subdivided -- cut up. This makes ammo an excellent barter item. One can easily imagine .22 LR rounds being the pennies of a barter society's currency.

    Do buy stuff less likely to be confiscated. Don't assume that today's relatively good times for shooters will last forever. A crisis brings out the totalitarians. You're likely to hang on longer to bolt action rifles and pump shotguns than to their semi-auto counterparts.

    Capture.JPG
     
  20. Modeler

    Modeler Molalla, Oregon Soccer Fan

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    I've never understood how gold and silver investors decry the fiat dollar and in the next breath justify their investments by valuing their metals in comparison to the dollar they just decried.