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Survival skill challenge

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by powersbj, Dec 1, 2012.

  1. powersbj

    powersbj Seattle Area Active Member

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    We've been having some bad weather here for the past couple of days, wet, rain, and wind. What a perfect time to practice our fire building. So using only what is in your bugout bag get a small camp fire going in your yard. Don't use anything that has been kept dry by a man made shelter, no wood from your wood pile etc... Try to keep it emulating being way out in the woods somewhere. For those who have already mastered wet weather fire building try doing it with flint and steel. Post a pic, tell us your method and how long it took. This is about skill building so challenge your self.
     
  2. lowly monk

    lowly monk Beaverton, Oregon. Just a guy. Bronze Supporter

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    I finally used a flare from the car. I will try later. Thanks.
     
  3. powersbj

    powersbj Seattle Area Active Member

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    I failed, made my self attempt it with only 3 matches. Tinder I made got wet as another cloud moved in and drenched me... Was very funny, and kinda sad... I will be practicing much more this winter, maybe I will gather tinder the from a near by park.
     
  4. coyoteman5

    coyoteman5 North south east west Active Member

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    Put some cotton balls coated really good with Vaseline in your bug out bag using a ziplock bag or something. Your flint and steel will spark it right up even wet I saw it at the sportsman show last year thought it was great will carry with me when ever hunting. Give it a try see what you think.
     
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  5. mosinguy1

    mosinguy1 out by the ocean Active Member

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    Part of my B.O.B and E.D.C bags are road flares I highly recomend them they will start a fire in damn near any situation. I also have other means but I have never had to resort to them. I have heard people say that they will give away your posistion!!! ANY fire will give away your posistion!!! And fire is needed in most all survival situations.
     
  6. ATCclears

    ATCclears Seattle area, WA Well-Known Member

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    I suppose I did similar in June when I had some friends in from Canada.

    I took the Biolite Campstove out of my GHB, got the initial fire going using some of the fire starter and matches I keep with it, and then fed it some dead (yet very damp) twigs from a nearby tree. The unit did fine and easily burned through the damp twigs. This was not an open fire though so it does not quite meet the requirements of the initial post.

    Peter
     
  7. oknow

    oknow amboy wa. Well-Known Member

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    might think about some steel wool and a 9v battery touch the 2 ends into the steel wool and it will start to burn with tinder on top of it works pretty good ( fine steel wool works best)
     
  8. Crunchtyme

    Crunchtyme Manchesterish New Member

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    For the last few years, I EDC a small pouch in my pocket that holds a Swiss Army Knife, fire steel, lip balm, and mini tampon ( good source of compact cotton fibers). By cutting a small chunk of the tampon, mixing the fibers with a small bit of the chapstick, and hitting it with fire steel, I have a small determined ember on which to build a good fire.

    My biggest eyeopening experience with performing a fire building challenge in the cold, is the amount of blood that can appear while making feather sticks with a sharp knife and cold wet hands. Slow down, and focus on the task. Haste makes scars. :)
     
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  9. ArBrnSnpr

    ArBrnSnpr PNW Active Member

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    We used to carry tampons as a field expedient way to pack gun shot wounds while on deployment. Sounds like a multi-purpose item every trunk and BOB should have.
     
  10. Crunchtyme

    Crunchtyme Manchesterish New Member

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    Carmex and medicated chapstick serve not only as lip moisturizer (in case of hot chicks in distress, .......hey It COULD happen....) , but fire starter, treatment for small cuts and scrapes, zipper lube, and rust prevention. It is a multi purpose product. Mixed with any tinder, be it dryer lint, sawdust, pocket lint, (I haven't tried belly button lint,) dry old mans beard, crushed pine needles, it takes a spark well, and holds a flame.
     
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  11. never4get

    never4get federal way Member

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    I took a 18 count egg carton, melted pariffin wax (melt on stove top in a bean can placed in boiling water, melts fast and won't ruin your wifes good pan) put magniesum shavings (look on e-bay, I find 1lb. bags 15.00) and cotton balls in the mix, when I get ready to light, I crush to get cotton fibers exposed, and stike a spark with a steel, these will burn for about 15 minutes, and about 6-10" high! If you can't get a fire going with that,.....atleast you can get your hands warm.... I just throw a couple in my pack and for
     
  12. FIDO6

    FIDO6 Benton County Member

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    Something I am surprised folks don't think of is to make a bed of rock under the fire. Heat from a fire will suck moisture right out of the ground and into a fledgeling fire and extinguish even some of the high speed-low drag fire starters. I make a point to start at least 1 miserable weather fire per year to keep the skill somewhat fresh. For starters I use old toilet paper rolls, tp and paraffin wax cap on one end, Vaseline, sawdust, and newsprint. I've never had one not start with a mag bar. I miss C-4, talk about a firestarter!
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2012
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  13. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    I've started more than my fair share of inclement weather fires, so I didn't feel the need to practice this time around. But I'm willing to share a bit of my experience:

    Vasoline and cotton balls are awesome for fire starting in crap weather, a good well soaked cotton ball will hold a stable hot flame for 15 minutes, and other than a stiff wind, not much puts it out. They are easily lit with a blast match, and can be lit with minimal effort with a magnesium fire starter (even when frozen).

    Gasoline is crap for starting fires, it burns intensely but doesn't burn long enough. If you want to use any kind of "light" fuel for fire starting, put it in a can start it burning, and then put stuff on top. If you just spray gas on a pile of wood it will never get burning, it will simply char the wood. Same thing applies to alcohol and hand sanitizer.

    Kerosine or diesel fuel on the other hand will start a fire when a pile of wood is doused with fuel, but requires a stable flame (like from a lighter or a match) to get going.

    Flares work, but blind you in the process. Also, flares are among the heaviest options here.

    If you have some esbit tablets, or trioxane fuel, both of these work as well as the cotton balls, but cost significantly more.

    As someone else said, water vapor from the ground will wick up and put out your fire, while this is true to a point it raises a bigger fire-safety flag. When you are building your "fire pit" you should dig down to mineral earth, fires can spread underground through buried biomass and create a forest fire, which is a much bigger issue in a survival situation. Digging a hole to put your fire in also has the advantage of making a place where a coal bed can be built up, which may allow you to keep a multi-day fire as you can simply re-kindle the coals the next morning. Coals also burn way hotter than a normal campfire, are better for cooking.
     
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