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For just basic security around the house. I generally lock the doors behind me as I work around the yard. I installed electronic combo locks on all the doors so if I have to get inside quickly, I don't have to jumble around with pulling keys out of my pocket and trying to put the key in upside-down. I also have a little rat terrier that barks if a bird farts across the street.
 
A large (24x36 ft or more) A-frame structure is pretty dang secure, especially if you can lay down steel armor on the enormous roof slopes and large panes of Level 3 to 4 or even 20mm AP (yea, no. Up to .338 LM AP or .50 BMG AP might be enough for 99
999% of protection needed unless the military thinks you're the next Osama Bin Laden :s0140: )bullet-resistant glass windows on one side, and armor up, fortify (dogleg with cameras and firing ports disguised as interior design motifs ;) )and have a sort of open floor plan on the first floor to have no blind spots. On the loft/2nd floor, it would be where you'd be sleeping, and so built to such that there's only 1 way in from the first floor, and have a 2nd exit to the outside if needed. Props if the 2nd floor can have a balcony deck outside where you can have as full a view as needed of the entry ways. It would be very spendy but it would also be pretty good.

There are trick bunker "vent" hole designs that curves out to the outside, to prevent grenades from going into the structure itself. A similar tactic might be useful here for the chimney and exhaust vents in order to prevent getting smoked out from external sources.
 
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Actually. Nix the steel armor. That's a bit spendy here.

How good is concrete mixed with Pea gravel or some such for bullet resistance? I know it was a thing for tanks to have concrete poured on them for supplemental armor in the 2nd World War, particularly on STuG IVs.. and I know concrete was used extensively for fortifications in that era too...
 
These little cabins would be far easier to fortify than your typical box houses :s0140: shopping (2).jpeg shopping.jpeg


Serious though, location, location, location!
 
Window and door frame total reinforcement is an absolute necessity. Especially in a new house.

You'd be shocked what "new construction" homes have for framing. I'd bet anybody on here with a house built after 2016 that I can boot your door in one kick (unless you've reinforced)

If you have a say in layout and design, no sliding glass door and no double back door. Single man door for your back door, reinforced.

Reinforced door between garage and house.

Anti-lift / Anti tamper (can't remember what they call it) roll up garage door if you have that.

Kids rooms away from the main hallways leading to front and rear bedrooms, easy line of fire for if bump in night turns to real threat.

As mentioned before no blind spots

Cameras with motion detection notification.

Driveway notifier ESPECIALLY if you're on big property off a busy road. Definitely one of those laser sensors that will ding you if anyone pulls into your drive. Especially if you can't see the main drive entrance from your property.


Edited to add-





if youre building from scratch and have no budget-



I've always wanted to have my bedroom or main room framed out with at least the first 6 feet having ar500 (or similar) steel or backing. Something bulletproof basically haha. But that's just something that comes to my mind here and there
 
if youre building from scratch and have no budget-



I've always wanted to have my bedroom or main room framed out with at least the first 6 feet having ar500 (or similar) steel or backing. Something bulletproof basically haha. But that's just something that comes to my mind here and there
I don't know. I'm starting to think reinforced concrete of a certain thickness have worked pretty dang well for forts during WW1, WW2 and immediately post-war...

Site selection, and good construction would do a lot?

Crucially, being a house on a far hill with clear field of fire around it would make the most sense.. about a few hundred yards from the road... and not right up against the road.
 
I don't know. I'm starting to think reinforced concrete of a certain thickness have worked pretty dang well for forts during WW1, WW2 and immediately post-war...

Site selection, and good construction would do a lot?

Crucially, being a house on a far hill with clear field of fire around it would make the most sense.. about a few hundred yards from the road... and not right up against the road.
Yes you're for sure right about that one. Site selection. Also, not to overthink here but probably if you're considering building a good secure place, might want to do it in a state that is friendly towards that kinda thing. Cause if you do that in washington and oregon and God forbid you do need to defend your home, they're gonna lock you up and in your trial they're gonna tell the liberal jurors all about your "right wing death compound" you built hahahahha
 
For just basic security around the house. I generally lock the doors behind me as I work around the yard. I installed electronic combo locks on all the doors so if I have to get inside quickly, I don't have to jumble around with pulling keys out of my pocket and trying to put the key in upside-down. I also have a little rat terrier that barks if a bird farts across the street.
When we moved Wife put two of those locks on this place. At first it seemed like a waste of money to me. Soon I could see I was wrong. They are damn nice. I got a new set of motion detectors for the exterior of the place bit ago. Damned if the dogs did not figure out what the sound is and start raising hell when they go off. :s0140:
Problem of course is often what sets one off is Barney the resident Owl flying by one and such. Is still nice that NOTHING is going to get in the home without the fur alarms going off. :D
 
When we moved Wife put two of those locks on this place. At first it seemed like a waste of money to me. Soon I could see I was wrong. They are damn nice. I got a new set of motion detectors for the exterior of the place bit ago. Damned if the dogs did not figure out what the sound is and start raising hell when they go off. :s0140:
Problem of course is often what sets one off is Barney the resident Owl flying by one and such. Is still nice that NOTHING is going to get in the home without the fur alarms going off. :D
Yeah speaking of dogs. Those idiots are smart lol.

My wife and I keep a tracker on each other's phones and vehicles, and when we get into our "home area" the phone makes a ding sound saying "so-and-so arrived home!" And from day one the dogs learned that and they absolutely freak out every time they hear that lol.
 
Actually. Nix the steel armor. That's a bit spendy here.

How good is concrete mixed with Pea gravel or some such for bullet resistance? I know it was a thing for tanks to have concrete poured on them for supplemental armor in the 2nd World War, particularly on STuG IVs.. and I know concrete was used extensively for fortifications in that era too...
If having a home built from scratch someone could look into solid walls. Done the way many buildings are done. Poured on the ground then tilted up into place. Not sure how much that adds to cost. LONG ago there was a fad where people were using old tires, packed with dirt, stacked up and then coated over. At the time it was an environmental thing. They were both using up old tires and homes were well insulated. Have not heard of it in a hell of a long time so no idea if its still done. Would sure as hell make them hard to shoot into though.
 
If having a home built from scratch someone could look into solid walls. Done the way many buildings are done. Poured on the ground then tilted up into place. Not sure how much that adds to cost. LONG ago there was a fad where people were using old tires, packed with dirt, stacked up and then coated over. At the time it was an environmental thing. They were both using up old tires and homes were well insulated. Have not heard of it in a hell of a long time so no idea if its still done. Would sure as hell make them hard to shoot into though.
I have family friends who built a large 3, 4,000 Sq ft house out in Prineville using straw hay bales and cement or something like that. They were able to save a lot of money on heating and cooling costs. That method of construction would indeed be hard to penetrate if someone uses say a foot thick of concrete on the outside... actually it might not be that much different from the 1960s fad of Brutalism? You know, where concrete pre-formed structures were the thing for government offices and such? But in all seriousness though; I'm not exactly sure what thickness of reinforced concrete is needed to stop up to .50BMG... though it might be closer to what's used for the car barriers on highways

Edit. I just know plain cinderblocks does nothing to stop rifle bullets :s0140: but pour concrete into the openings, maybe?
 


According to this, it looks like 1.45-1.5" thick Bullet-resistant fiberglass interior panels should stop pretty much most rifle rounds... so a composite armor scheme; some form of armor sheathing between plywood and metal roof, and the fiberglass interior panels between the studs and drywall, and one should be pretty well protected outside and inside short of a military excursion?
 

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