Reloading advice sought re: Berry's plated bullets

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I am new to reloading and have been purchasing equipment and supplies. Soon my Lee Hand Press will arrive ( I am starting out slow). I also have in that order a Lee Reloading book and 1000 of Berry's plated RNHB 185gr bullets for .45acp reloading.
My question is where do I find data for loading this type of bullet? I have seen advice to load to specifications of a comparable lead bullet. My real problem is finding the RNHB (round nose, hollow base) design to compare. I can find RN but no reference to HB. Maybe I should have bought bullets that have more readily available loading data. Your ideas please....

I appreciate your help.

Doug
 
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Use a starting load at or slightly less than the minimium for std jacketed bullets, you will be fine. An old - old - old load using reddot.. (I know this ages me) is something less that 4.0grs. shots fine, if it will cycle your piece. load a few of whatever powder you are using, and check the spent cases for pressure signs.. buldged or cracked cases, and of course flatened or mashed primers. Then pressures 2 high. Sandy
 
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From some of the things I've read about jacketed bullets, it seems that you want to load to around lead velocities, because anything over 1000fps you risk splitting the plating off and having a bad day. But this may be different with Berrys plating process.

I've never lost any plating using Rainier, but I've only run them in .45acp in 230gr, which was flying a bit under 1000 ft/s.
 
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FAQ: How do I load Berry's Preferred Plated Bullets?
Plated bullets occupy a position between cast bullets and jacketed bullets. They are soft lead, but have a hard outer shell on them. When loading plated bullets we have found best results using low- to mid-range jacketed data in the load manual. You must use data for a bullet that has the same weight and profile as the one you are loading. Do not exceed mid-range loads. Do not use magnum loads.

FAQ: How fast can I shoot these bullets?
Velocities depend on the caliber, but as a rule of thumb, we recommend you don't shoot our plated bullets over 1200 feet-per-second. Our 44's actually shoot best around 1150 fps. 45's are generally good at 850-900 fps. Our bullets are not recommended for magnum velocities.



From some of the things I've read about jacketed bullets, it seems that you want to load to around lead velocities, because anything over 1000fps you risk splitting the plating off and having a bad day. But this may be different with Berrys plating process.

I've never lost any plating using Rainier, but I've only run them in .45acp in 230gr, which was flying a bit under 1000 ft/s.
 
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Plated bullet manufacturers should give a max. velocity for a given bullet, plating thickness and bullet design will dictate velocity. Hollow base bullets are prone to bullet nose separation from the skirt when recommended pressures and velocity are exceeded. Plated bullets are more sensitive when fired in revolvers do to roll crimp and the cylinder to barrel jump, I use a taper crimp for plated bullets, to much roll crimp or velocity will cause the plating to separate from the core.
 
OP
D
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Berry's customer service is excellent. I called asking for technical assistance, no one was available or in the office, or maybe they outsource, anyway they gave me a man's number (Bud), I left a message and he promptly called me back. He helped me reason out a safe load. I loaded the .45 caliber Berry hollow base round nose (HBRN) 185gr. plated bullets with 5.1 grains of HP-38, to a C.O.L. of 1.195" The 8 rounds I took to the range shot well enough, soft load, so I am going to juice it up to 5.3 grains which should be perfect. A word of advise..... I AM NEW TO RELOADING. TAKE MY EXPERIENCE FOR WHAT IT IS WORTH. I do however have all my fingers and a target full of holes. A good time was had. Thanks to the members for helping me out.

P.S. can someone answer why my loading data has me load at 1.195" C.O.L. It seems like such a short stubby round. It cycles well but in comparison to factory rounds it looks odd.
P.P.S I have sinced discovered the errors of my ways. I was using the minimum overall length, because I did not read close enough, keyword is minimum. My current understanding is with the load I was using I could be in an overall length range of 1.195" to 1.275". Perhaps loading powder at the starting to mid range saved me an accident. I am new and just sharing thoughts, don't take my post for anything more than my experience as a newbie.
 
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I have sinced discovered the errors of my ways. I was using the minimum overall length, because I did not read close enough, keyword is minimum. My current understanding is with the load I was using I could be in an overall length range of 1.195" to 1.275". Perhaps loading powder at the starting to mid range saved me an accident.
Say you have a load where the powder occupies 75% of the case volume after the bullet is seated,and the remaining 25% is air. we will call this a 75% load density. Now if a charge of 5.0gr of powder behind a 230gr bullet with a COL of 1.275" gives a 75% LD at 16,000 psi then all is well, but if the COL is reduced, the load density is increased and the pressure will be higher, this is the reason for the min. COL.
 
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Plated bullet manufacturers should give a max. velocity for a given bullet, plating thickness and bullet design will dictate velocity. Hollow base bullets are prone to bullet nose separation from the skirt when recommended pressures and velocity are exceeded. Plated bullets are more sensitive when fired in revolvers do to roll crimp and the cylinder to barrel jump, I use a taper crimp for plated bullets, to much roll crimp or velocity will cause the plating to separate from the core.
I wrote RCBS (3times) trying to get details about how to crimp, or not crimp a Berry's .38 special non-cannelure bullet. They were somewhat unclear, but it seems what I was doing is fine. I used a taper crimp and just "kiss crimp" the shell. The information that RCBS sent me led me to believe I should use a standard roll crimp die on this load. I am sure they get thousands of emails everyday and I appreciate that they are trying to help but sometimes they can give confusing advice.
It took me a few tries and some crunched brass, but I give it just enough taper crimp to smooth the area where the exposed bullet meets the brass.
I read a lot trying to find an answer to this and the more I read the more confused I was. I have fired 15 of these loads and they shot really well so I was not too worried, but I do want to do these reloads correctly and safely to the best of my ability.
It seems I get more correct info from these forums than just about anywhere.
 

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