Inspired by similar threads started by yours-truly and others in Off-Topic and at least one in this section: What are you read (relatively) recently, reading now, or will soon on the topic of Preparedness?

My inquiry isn't completely random: There are four topics, at a minimum, that I have endeavored to be reading a book in the genre at all times, even if the success rate isn't always 100%. Preparedness, albeit at times only tangentially related, is one of them. I did a bunch of reading on the topic earlier in the year, just finished another book, and find myself unsure of what to study next, or even in what niche. So, figured it would be fun to kick around.

So, with all that said, whatcha reading in preparedness (and related)? Any good, bad, or ugly? Thanks!
 
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Currently reading Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose, so it’ll be awhile before I read another prepping/survival book.

But I am collecting books to add to the farm’s library. Topics range from general country living to reading, writing, and ‘rithmetic. Several books on preserving food, including pickling. Some books on making things (soap, vinegar, etc).

A few books about black-powder guns, and how to make black powder. I’m thinking about finding some good instructions on making paper. (Thinking about the recent toilet paper shortage.)
 
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Inspired by similar threads started by yours-truly and others in Off-Topic and at least one in this section: What are you read (relatively) recently, reading now, or will soon on the topic of Preparedness?

My inquiry isn't completely random: There are four topics, at a minimum, that I have endeavored to be reading a book in the genre at all times, even if the success rate isn't always 100%. Preparedness, albeit at times only tangentially related, is one of them. I did a bunch of reading on the topic earlier in the year, just finished another book, and find myself unsure of what to study next, or even in what niche. So, figured it would be fun to kick around.

So, with all that said, whatcha reading in preparedness (and related)? Any good, bad, or ugly? Thanks!
What are the four topics?
 
Just finished The Day After Never Blood Honor by Russell Blake, now waiting to recieve the second in the series.
Giving the series a re-read ATM. Am on #8 currently.

Recommend*, for those folks whom have an interest in post apocalyptic fiction.

Much seems rather plausible, along with much many would consider laughable*.

*Ex: Everyone whom wears ballistic plates, only wears ceramic plates.
**Ex 2: Antibiotics seem like MAGIC! Regardless of the traumatic injury involved (injuries which would require multiple specialized surgeries & critical care stays in "normalcy").

Still recommend. Rather entertaining, for the genre.
 
What are the four topics?
  1. Something human (e.g., sociology, history, anthropology, genetics, relationship dynamics, sexology, psychology, neuroscience, religion in various forms, shifts in cultural norms, et al.).
  2. Something machine (e.g., computer/computational science, genetic engineering, industrial topics, futurism, et al.). It can be germane to my occupation or not, though it is a benefit when it is.
  3. Something preparedness (e.g., civil defense, how tos/DIY, agriculture, security, history directly related to the topic, family preparedness, firearms-related, disaster recovery, et al.)
  4. Something whatever (e.g., a novel, a topic I'm interested in, a recommended work from a friend or colleague, etc.)
(Admittedly, I rarely hit all the points, but it is the goal. This year has been decidedly mixed, but not bad considering the bonkers time-crunch in this foul year of our Lord, 2022.)
 
The Book of Enoch
Interesting choice. A couple of decades ago I studied the Enochian literature (I Enoch, II Enoch aka Slavonic Enoch, et al.) as part of a broader examination of intertestamental and pseudepigraphal literature. I'm not clear on the intersection with preparedness, but, admittedly, it was a long while ago since I've read anything in that genre.
 
pseudepigraphal literature. I'm not clear on the intersection with preparedness
I've just completed assembling a couple items that were written by someone who apparently didn't speak English. One was the only actual right-number-of-parts-and-screws while relying totally on a clear graphic line drawing with no written instructions.

My resultant observation is that attempting to intersect preparedness with any particular theory of order, if the source can't ensure the proper number of parts & show how it works together, the literature really is merely pseudepigraphical. I have high hopes for Enoch, arriving on my door tomorrow.
 
Parenthetically, I am working on an Amazon order, and there will be four books from a large series entitled "Girls survive". From what I've gathered, it is a series of historical fiction, in which a school-aged girl survives some catastrophe in history, recent or in the most distant past. I ran it past her mother (who is an educator in the subject matter) and she indicated it could be good for our daughter to learn of history, preparedness, et al. So, with a birthday in a few weeks, seems like worth a shot. :)
 
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