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In the various gun videos I watch, gun tv shows or photos in gun mags, I see almost all pulling the trigger with the index finger's first joint/ crease.

As a young shooter, I was always admonished to use the tip of the index finger as sensitivity was greatest there.

When did that idea go out the window?
 

ma96782

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I'd guess......it depends on the length of your finger(s), the size of your hand(s), the grip size of the particular firearm, etc......

Being "admonished" for a physical "limitation/challenge" just sounds sooooo ______________.

Mind you that I got that memo about being more inclusive, less divisive and etc....etc..... Rrrrright...... Just doing my part to spread some love.

coexist-demotivational-poster-1286427725.jpg

Aloha, Mark
 
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Growing up I never really paid attention to how my finger rested on the trigger, but when I joined the military I was quickly informed that I was "doing it wrong" (using the first joint of my index finger) and was repeatedly and forcefully retrained to use the tip of my finger when applying pressure to the trigger.

I must admit that I didn't notice much change in my accuracy, but there could have been some unnoticed improvement I suppose. I've been using the tip of my finger ever since because that training really stuck. Its amazing how quickly you can permanently pick up a new skill or technique when large intimidating men are screaming in your face... err... giving you remedial training for a few weeks :D!
 
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depends on if you are shooting off hand at 15yards or benched at 1000yards. You wont see the difference until you appreciate your groups from afar. Try both and see which works better for you. Fingertip holds and triggering are very very effective for ELR.
 
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I grew up with guns and the trigger finger was one thing that was never mentioned to me. I got in the habit of using the crease in the first joint. After decades of doing it this way I started to hear the pad of the finger thing. I still try this now and then. Still can't shoot as well this way as the old way. Don't know if it's just "me" or if it's because I did it "wrong" for so damn long??
 
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As others have said, it depends. Accuracy or speed?

I use the flat of the finger beyond the crease of the first joint. I suppose some call that the tip, but it is midway between the tip and the joint. The lighter the trigger (like the set trigger on my CZ 527) the further towards the tip I try to use, the heavier the trigger or the faster I shoot, the more toward the joint.
 

Stomper

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In the various gun videos I watch, gun tv shows or photos in gun mags, I see almost all pulling the trigger with the index finger's first joint/ crease.

As a young shooter, I was always admonished to use the tip of the index finger as sensitivity was greatest there.

When did that idea go out the window?


When shooting a shoulder fired rifle, Army training dictates “just the tip”.....


:D
 

ilikegunspdx

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Imo whatever gives u a consistent backwards only pull with zero movement or pressure going to either side is the right choice. Ie “whatever works best for you”.

For precision stuff for me personally I get a lot of benefit out of wide triggers (or thin triggers with wide trigger shoes on them) just because it helps make a consistent backwards only squeeze and makes it really hard for any sideward pressure or movement to creep in. But that’s personal preference and may not be right for the next person.

Fwiw, here is an example of a thinner plastic trigger that is curved on the edges (see curved ribs above trigger shoe). To me the stock trigger is almost ready-made to introduce some sort of accidental minute “roll” of the finger or sideways pressure or movement due to the curved edges. The aftermarket metal trigger shoe shown creates a much bigger flat surface that is really hard to have any “roll” or minute sideways movement. Again the next person might hate trigger shoes so whatever works for you. On small pistols especially this makes a significant difference for me. D3F94A49-0976-4D73-9B26-1AA3846CD386.jpeg
 
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bbbass

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As a kid I wasn't allowed to have guns. But Dad didn't prohibit me from shooting my friends BB guns and .22 rifle and revolver. I was told by my friend's dad not to use the crease. Anything from the pad to the tip as long as it's not the crease. We made fun of people on TV that shot using the crease.

By the time I was in the service, joined at 23, I knew how to shoot most guns but had never shot an AR. I used the tip or far end of the pad if you wish. That worked well enough to score expert in both rifle and pistol. The rifles were AR type (I don't think they were M16s) and the pistol was a Colt .45ACP Govt.

I think the fingertip works well for the SA trigger on a 1911/2011 but may not work as well for the standard mil-spec trigger on an AR. Maybe that's why i put a 2.5lb trigger on my varmint AR and kept the ALG ACT for my braced AR pistol.

Lately, I read that for DA or Glock triggers, a mid-pad on the trigger gives better results and that a tip will make ya shoot left. I tried it and it didn't seem to make a difference. So I'll just stick with the tip, the way I learned. I don't want to have to switch when I shoot my .308 Ruger M77 anyway.

BTW, on a pistol, if your fingers are too short too long etc... IMO ya got the wrong pistol or need one with replaceable grip or backstrap. Just sayin.

Revolver DA with 12lb pull, definitely I'm using the pad. But I changed out the springs to 6lb pull, so all is good.

Last word: Ask Gunny!!!
 
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The Army tried to train my 20 years of shooting out of me, but they eventually realized that I don't miss, and they should let me keep doing what I'm doing.

For standard M-16 family triggers with standard M-16 style handles, I have my hand jammed so far up and forward that I'm using basically the second knuckle joint.

If I'm bench shooting a long rifle or anything without a pistol grip, I use the first pad and sometimes slip to the first knuckle crease.

In 12 years of training shooters in the Army, I learned to teach the manual and then say "but whatever is comfortable and consistently gets rounds on target is what you should do. Try stuff out until you find what's best for your body."
 
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Imo whatever gives u a consistent backwards only pull with zero movement or pressure going to either side is the right choice. Ie “whatever works best for you”.

For precision stuff for me personally I get a lot of benefit out of wide triggers (or thin triggers with wide trigger shoes on them) just because it helps make a consistent backwards only squeeze and makes it really hard for any sideward pressure or movement to creep in. But that’s personal preference and may not be right for the next person.

Fwiw, here is an example of a thinner plastic trigger that is curved on the edges (see curved ribs above trigger shoe). To me the stock trigger is almost ready-made to introduce some sort of accidental minute “roll” of the finger or sideways pressure or movement due to the curved edges. The aftermarket metal trigger shoe shown creates a much bigger flat surface that is really hard to have any “roll” or minute sideways movement. Again the next person might hate trigger shoes so whatever works for you. On small pistols especially this makes a significant difference for me. View attachment 744954

I hate serrated triggers.

I also hate the "safety" lever on Glocks and some other striker fired guns.

Both are uncomfortable for my finger and affect accuracy. I ground down the safety lever on a Glock until it was flat against the main trigger when depressed fully - I don't understand why they felt that it was necessary to have it extend past the face of the trigger when it was fully depressed.
 

thorborg

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Tip works well on my Tikka but not so, on my 45 revolver. I just go with the fit and flow of the tool in hand. Others opines might be considered, then go with what works for you. .
Like the other guy said, don't want to offend anyone here, but I doubt there are many in this world that can fire a 7,62X38 1865 Nagant revolver with a single finger tip.
But if you can: :s0152::eek: and no, I don't want to shake your hand.
 

teflon6string

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My dad and other mentors (Indian Guides, scouts, cops) taught me over half a century ago to use the tip of my index finger. Still works great with a single action/bolt action weapon where my right hand moves and repositions between each shot. Semi-auto .22 too.

But as hard as I've tried the tip method with bigger, jumpier semi-autos and full autos, my finger ends up creeping across the trigger with each shot fired. I finally realized I'm more consistent if I let that happen, stay attuned to the subtle click of trigger reset (release no further than that) and carefully squeeze again without moving, pushing, pulling, flexing or "torqueing" anything.

Helping newbies get comfortable with weps, I explain both techniques, encourage them to try both and remain mindful of the miniscule forces in play. Then figure out what works best for them. As with me, it seems to vary from person to person and weapon to weapon, so it's all subjective at best.

YMMV
 
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The idea that the fingertip should be used came about because of the triggers that were standard on most firearms. They had a lot of creep and you had to use the first portion of your digit to have the strength to pull the trigger so far and then the sensitivity to know when you'd "hit the wall" and your next twitch would discharge the weapon. That began to change when higher quality firearms had "set" triggers that would allow you to remove all the slack and then just barely touch the trigger to detonate said bullet. The Marines taught me to stop using my big toe.
 
As others have said, it depends. Accuracy or speed?

I use the flat of the finger beyond the crease of the first joint. I suppose some call that the tip, but it is midway between the tip and the joint. The lighter the trigger (like the set trigger on my CZ 527) the further towards the tip I try to use, the heavier the trigger or the faster I shoot, the more toward the joint.
I too try and split the difference. Off the tip can cause you to bend your finger/hand to make the shot. In the crease I did not feel it enough. In the middle works for me on either. I try an always be conscious in order to gain muscle memory.
 
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