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Need advice on a good multi stage reloader to buy

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by glockguy, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. glockguy

    glockguy Albany Oregon Well-Known Member

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    So Im looking into getting into reloading. Id like a multi stage one, not a single, what would you guy suggest to be the best most efficient one
     
  2. Janes

    Janes Enid, Oklahoma Member

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    I have a Dillon 550B. I have had it for several years and really like it.
     
  3. Modly

    Modly Beaverton Active Member

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    What is your budget, and what calibers do you plan on loading right off the bat?
     
  4. P7id10T

    P7id10T Cedar Hills Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Depends on your budget mostly, secondly what you plan to do with it. There is no lack of posts or other internet info on this.
    You can go to ultimatereloader.com or check out gavintoobe on Youtube for many reviews and a look see at presses. You can also check out Dillon XL650 VS RCBS Pro 2000 VS Hornady Lock-N-Load AP - Page 1 - AR15.COM at arf.com

    Do your homework - it will pay off with a press you are satisfied with.
     
  5. glockguy

    glockguy Albany Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Well I got a guy wanting to trade me a reloading set up for my trailer I'm selling or trading , here's a pic and a copy of the email he sent me about it. Sadly the only calibers I have right now are 9mm an .40. Also how much is all this worth?

    The progressive isnt even a year old and is set up for 223 and 45acp. I have another quick change plate and powder die for it that I was gonna do 308 with.It just needs another set of 308 dies and would be ready to crank them out. You can piece the quick changes together for cheaper than the kits cost for any caliber up to 50bmg I think. The single stage will load every die I have and can go up to 50bmg. I have dies for 45acp, 223, 25-06, 270, 30-30, 308, 7mag. Doubles and triples of some like 223 and 45 and maybe 25-06 I think. There is probably 15-20 pounds of varying powders, 1200-1300 assorted caliber bullets including match grade 308 and Hornady FTX 30 cal. Bunch of speer stuff. Around 14,000 assorted primers. Just the primers are probably worth 500 bucks. Around 250-300 bucks worth of once fired brass thats mostly 223 and 45acp but a little of everything. A bunch of ammo cases and little boxes for parts. 2 loading manuals. A mini fridge to keep powder and primers in for moisture protection. All the stuff Ive gathered over like 5 years I guess. All my stuff was bought new and kept in my office. Ill try to get you some pics tonight or tomorrow..

    7B771732-BA75-482F-A52E-401D0F82CB9A-593-00000032A4F525DB.jpg
     
  6. Modly

    Modly Beaverton Active Member

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    The blue press is a Dillon 650, which runs $566 new from Dillon (And is only a week out on shipping right now).

    It's a good press. All the extras... I'd really have to think to add them up, but he slightly exaggerated the primer value. They are currently hard to find, but I paid under $400 for 15,000 primers, after shipping and hazmat before the panic.

    What were you hoping to get for your trailer in cash value?
     
  7. glockguy

    glockguy Albany Oregon Well-Known Member

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    1500.
     
  8. Modly

    Modly Beaverton Active Member

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    I'd say you are getting a fair value then.

    You can always trade or sell off the caliber stuff you don't want to use, and switch it out for ones you do.

    You'll be looking at roughly $300 for the hardware to make .40 and 9mm happen (rounded up, you can probably find it all for much less).
     
    orygun and (deleted member) like this.
  9. glockguy

    glockguy Albany Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Yea that's true, I'd probably keep the 223 n .45 though.
     
  10. 2ndtimer

    2ndtimer SE Washington state Active Member

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    I would say that is an excellent deal, if you have the room for all the stuff. You can probably get some cash out of the stuff you don't want. I might make you an offer on the .270 Win dies and maybe some of the powder if I am in your area in the near future. You could also trade some of the stuff you don't need for components that you do.
     
  11. Beta1759

    Beta1759 Beaverton Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    i have the hornady LnL, and if i would to do it again, i wouldn't buy it. its given me nothing but headaches. I have replaced almost every part of that press at least 1 time. The customer service at hornady is amazing however, but i would purchase a dillon if i could do it again.
     
  12. 2ndtimer

    2ndtimer SE Washington state Active Member

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    FWIW, a couple of buddies and I chipped in on a Dillon RL-550B years ago. It has been an excellent machine, although they never bothered to learn how to run it. They just leave it to me. As long as they share their components, I don't mind.
     
  13. ripcity

    ripcity Milwaukie Active Member

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    I have the dillon 650 and love it. I've had nothing but good success from it.
     
  14. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Since you don't reload and by logic/inference, don't shoot much, just get a single stage or auto-advance turret (Lee Classic) and the dies you use/shoot.
    Anywhere from $75-150 for good times.
     
  15. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    I would HIGHLY recommend you buy a single stage press first. Jumping right into a progressive is a very good way to make a lot of rounds with no powder in it, or a lot of bombs. Neither option is good. Also, you're talking about spending $1500 on something you don't even know that you'll like.

    Start single stage, most of the tools carry over, and you can get into a "beginner" single stage kit for about $250-350 (including dies) depending on calibers.

    The 550 is a decent machine, however it's a very bad machine to learn on, the lack of auto-index makes double charges, or no-charges a good possibility if you're not paying attention. The dillon 650 has a penchant for the primer tubes exploding. Personally, I actually rather like the hornady LNL, it lacks a few features (namely quick change toolhead), however I think I picked mine up for around $400. (which is less than the 550) However because of the lack of QC toolhead, I just leave mine set up for running 9mm. I also have a 650 I use for processing .223 brass, and another 550 that I've had forever that I load .45, .308 and .223 on. I personally think the 650 is a turd, it's full of delicate parts that break and jam frequently when the machine gets dirty (which it does constantly).

    Also, on the LNL, I'm running a dillon powder measure, and a dillon powder sensor. I universally hate the design of hornady dies and I'm not much of a fan of dillon's dies either. I personally prefer RCBS, Redding and lyman.
     
  16. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Really? Just how many of those "explosions" and you document?

    Obviously you are entitled to your opinion but it's certainly not a widely shared one. I have had exactly TWO parts break on mine. One was a manufacturing flaw and the other a spring that got tired after 100K rounds. Among those that shoot a lot, not just in the hundreds or thousands of rounds per year, but competitors that shoot by the 10's of thousands, the 650 is pretty much the "standard".

    A "turd"?????? I've seen some real "crap" in the reloading equipment offered but not a 650.

    As for getting dirty frequently? not sure what was wrong with your's but other than an occasional "hit" with a dry paint brush, and a good wipe-down when changing calibers, my press has yet to need a heavy cleaning.

    That aside, anyone loading less than 100 rounds per week or so definitely does not need a progressive. A single stage, maybe a turret, would more than fill the bill.
     
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  17. nwbobber

    nwbobber Longview, Wa. Active Member

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    If you want to shoot a lot this is a good deal. You will have to spend some more money to get it all working. With all the opinions flying around I have to say that I really like the RL550b I have, and only wish I had bought the 650. I have a set of Dillon dies for the .40, and .45acp, and us RCBS fir .9mm, and frankly would like to replace them with the Dillon dies because I can load faster with the Dillons. You can take the bullet seater apart and clean it without losing adjustment, the size die is chamfered so a slight misalignment of the shell plate will not run the case mouth into the die and stop you mid stroke.

    I don't think starting on a progressive is impossible for an intelligent person who gives attention to detail, and goes slowly and carefully at first. If you are not that kind of person, I might suggest using the single stage press for a while until you understand everything well, then move on to the progressive. Or just buy ammo. The claims of rounds per hour that the manufacturers make are for well practiced individuals, on a good day. You, starting out will not acheive these speeds, and should not try, but try to make sure everything is perfect. Check every case visually for powder charge, weigh any that don't look right.

    Here is a link to the 650 manual Read it through and you will learn what it is going to take to get set up for your calibers.

    This thing will probably cost you money, you will start shooting more, lurking in outlets for powder and primers, ordering bullets by the case etc. But its all fun.
     
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  18. Don H

    Don H Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I'm very far from being mechanically inclined and I'm a newbie that started with a Dillon 550B and have yet to blow anything up. I like the fact that it doesn't have an auto-indexer because it allows me time to make sure every station is correct. As long as you pay attention, which you should anyway, why not start with a progressive press?
     
  19. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Something to consider is that rare is the reloader that doesn't have a single stage press along with the "Progressive". Not saying they don't exist but a great percentage find the single stage perfect for loading that box of hunting loads, working up a new load, or making that "dead-nuts on, perfect, polished, round for their bolt action super accurate rifle.

    That's the main reason I suggest that one start with a single stage. Not just so they can learn, finished round by finished round, but because the chances are high that they'll want that single stage press in their future. It also helps a newb to get a handle on just how much ammo they will really be loading in a week, month, or year.

    Don't discount the speed capabilities of a single stage. NO, they don't rival that of a progressive but in my case I can turn out 100 rounds per hour with my Rock Chucker. Setting aside prep time to include de-priming, sizing, cleaning, re-priming, and using an RCBS Chargemaster Combo I can charge with powder and seat bullets at a measured rate of 100 rounds per hour in .223 or .308 (Match grade).
     
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  20. AMProducts

    AMProducts Maple Valley, WA Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer Silver Supporter

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    It's happened to me at least 4 times, for now I know exactly what causes it and try to avoid it. Typically what will happen is if you "miss" a case, the primer system feeds another primer anyways. Well if that primer doesn't drop out of the wheel like it's supposed to, it can get pinched as the wheel moves back into the slot. You come up too fast... BOOOOM!

    It's been less of an issue lately as I recommend running only primed brass on it, I only use mine for processing now.


    Lets see... the spring underneath the case pickup shuttle... that one breaks frequently enough to be really annoying, it's also difficult to remove after breaking. I've broken a few of the advancing collars, the springs inside the case-feed singulator break rather often.

    I should point out, that I will reload 100K in about 6-7 business days, I know what it takes to push a machine to the point of failure and in my opinion the 650 just doesn't measure up.


    You're clearly not loading enough ammunition. :)