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Any concerns about food shortages?

bbbass

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The reality is that this is a matter of a first world myopic viewpoint. While many places around the planet have to scratch everyday to get by, we have plenty. If you were to ask them what they do to prepare for hard times they would look at you and say, everyday is hard times.
In our world, some people do actively think about what happens when we don't have plenty anymore while others just assume that we will always have plenty. We may very well go from first world to third world in a blink of an eye. It would be prudent to be somewhat prepared.
Just my skewed two cents.
I'm old enough that I don't care. How's that for skewed? :p;):D

Nope, I've got some foodstuffs, other than that I stockpile ammo and can solve my problems with that.
 
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What we have he-ah, is safe space fear...

Get you a binkey, a blankey, stick yer thumb in yer mouth, assume the fetal position and worry, while the rest of the grown ups laugh and laugh...there, there, just rock yourself to sleep, it'll all be ok....ya f-ing vahina...
 
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Some will live, some will die, natural selection will take its course no matter if a person is ready worried or not.
To many variables in life to worry about just one thing like food. And one can worry about everything, get an ulcer, die and it won't matter. :rolleyes:

I am not worried, just worried on knee jerk reactions from Liberals.
 
Am I concerned about food shortages?
No.
Righton, with you there. Doesn't bother me either.


I am more worried about people panic buying when they hear someone suggesting there may be a food shortage.
Hmm, I diverge here. I support everyone running out and panic buying now. Buy lots, buy more, buy extra toilet paper and buy all the othlant buleberries, plant fruit trees, raise chickens, NOW. We here in my house have craploads stockpiled and this doesn't bother me at all, and maybe if they get off their asses and get it done the sheeple won't need to pound on my door and ask us to share when it goes bad. I encourage panic buying. Buy it all, buy it now, buy more. Stock it deep, stock it .....hmmm. Just don't come bothering me when it goes bad is my advice to neighbors, cause we've been paying the price now to be stocking and prepping and have done so for a long time and are ready. Other folks need to play catch up and I support their doing so.
 
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As long as there's water there will be adequate production. Those of us in infrastructure know how to take out water supplies to exert maximum damage to crop and animal production. As long as things remain peaceful I wouldn't worry about food and animal product availability. There's plenty of elasticity built in for historical natural events. Something unexpected, sure, it could mess things up. War would be one of those. The sun going supernova. Mass volcano eruptions. Widespread earthquakes/tsunamis, etc, etc. Else, if things get tight, exports will get cut back and more supply directed domestically. No worries.
 
With all the fat diabetic motherbubblegummers waddling around in this country... a little starvation wouldn’t be such a bad thing. ;)

Hey now!!! I just built up a little extra reserve I'm sayin'....just a little extra ...ya know, in case the SHTF for real. Where I can I get some of that canned bacon?
 

NW Backpacker

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I was just wondering if anyone has any concerns about a food shortage? I know with a of the flooding in the Midwest that a lot of farmers gave up on planting this year.

Illinois farmers give up on planting after floods, throw party instead

I am not sure how dependent we are on corn or other crops for from the Midwest but would expect higher prices since millions of acres of corn were not planted. I am thinking about stocking up on some canned goods and other items now.

I am not sure if MSM has posted anything yet either but I expect food prices to rise in the future.
Would not worry about the flooding in the Midwest causing a serious food shortage. I do think it is a good idea to have as much food stashed as you can in case a big disaster occurs. Financial collapse, big earthquake, EMP shutting down the electrical grid and pretty much everything else as well, civil disturbance, snowmageddon, contagious disease outbreak......

2009 novel on the USA getting hit by an EMP - spoiler alert - things get UGLY. Probably available at your local library also:

https://www.amazon.com/Unknown-One-Second-After/dp/B001WYVAJ8/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=one+second+after&qid=1572759853&sr=8-1


EMP info:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_electromagnetic_pulse


Food with 30 year shelf life - too spendy for me, but if you can afford it just buy once, store it and forget it. (You can buy the single serving pouches at your local outdoor store and try them - when hungry they're not bad.) ;)
https://www.mountainhouse.com/m/category/10cans.html

I'll go with the Dave Ramsey budget method for now: beans and rice, and rice and beans. :)
 
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Right now - in first world countries? Food shortages unlikely.

When my parents bought a nice house in 1968 in Salem, the median cost was about equivalent to 3 year's median household income. Today it is about 5 years median household income (more in places like Portland or Seattle). Today's cost of living, adjusted for inflation, is about 50% higher than it was 20 years ago.

Eventually, basics like food, shelter, etc., will increasingly be out of the reach of more and more people. Even if available, they won't be able to afford it.

Gradually food, energy, water, arable land and shelter will get increasingly expensive over time, especially with climate change and more so because of increasing population.

Being able to grow at least some of your own food will be an advantage over time. Depending on how much longer you and your family expect to live, and how much income you have, you might experience issues being able to afford basic living expenses.

A few fruit trees, some berry bushes, various veggies, your own well, your own source of electricity (solar), a backup source of heat (wood stove) - all of these are doable for many people. Paying off debt will go a long ways towards keeping shelter available.

But others are going to struggle, and that means increased crime and conflict.
 

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