Aging meat?

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by Atroxus, May 24, 2010.

  1. Doc In UPlace

    Doc In UPlace
    Tacoma-ish
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    Nor about "how did you feel this morning when you woke up."
     
  2. 156256Hunter

    156256Hunter
    Fairview-ish
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    If it's really warm out and you don't get the meat cooled off quickly enough, it's sort of like the bones warming up too much (or not cooling off) and "souring" the meat from the inside out.

    Happened to me for the first time last year with a bull elk. It was late October when we were still having that really warm weather. Due to circumstances, hide wasn't off for probably 4 hours, and elk wasn't completely cooled off for another 4 or 5 hours. Saved the majority of the meat, however.
     
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  3. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand
    Southern Oregon Coast
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    15625 Hunter - Heat is the biggest problem we as hunters have when it comes to handling our kills. An Elk is a lot to handle no matter where it is put down. I can understand you having problems with an animal that large. I killed a Bull that required over twenty four hours to move out of the woods.
    Going in to the hunt, required I cross a stream that could float the rig! Small poles were placed side by side for it's full width, this spread the stream to a width three or four times it's normal allowing me to cross it with my Pickup truck. The next day only small repairs were required to cross it again or it may have been a good part of that day also to get him into the barn sixty miles away. I consider twenty four hours pretty good time for that Kill.
    I worried the whole time about the meet. I pulled him up to the pickup by driving the pickup short distances and re rigging my gear, then on to the upper side of a summer logging road using the winch, Propped him in place, backed the truck under him and just put the winch in forward then into reverse, thump he was loaded in one piece. On his back with sticks holding him open I never lost the meat. We do what we do and I for one am no expert but the thing is I have done it.
    Silver Hand
     
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  4. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand
    Southern Oregon Coast
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    It is more difficult to skin a cold animal and you are entitled to skin them in the field if you wish. Many and most of my shots are at long range, 600+ in the coast hills with no roads back to my point of aim, or after walking in the forest for hours, the rig is usually a long distance away. Ever try to pack out a bear going down hill sliding it through a stream for a day, I have.

    Having spent years customizing my rifles, rounds and Glass. I understand Hunting is not a sport for the weary and all of our circumstances vary, I will never skin any animal regardless of the species until it is in my barn.
    Silver Hand
     
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  5. Sstrand

    Sstrand
    La Grande OR
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    I guess your way is OK for road hunters . . . (Folks that are close to a road or mechanical help)
    The only thing we skin in the area of the barn is something we get from the pasture or one of the steers we raise for the freezer.

    Sheldon
     
  6. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand
    Southern Oregon Coast
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    I have a nice ranch here and I prefer leaving the wild life to themselves. I more enjoy watching the elk in my pasture and the deer we feed at the front door, than I do shooting them under my apple trees.
    Silver Hand
     
  7. Sstrand

    Sstrand
    La Grande OR
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    I just pretend I am the IRS and once in a while I collect Income Taxes . . .

    Sheldon
     
  8. Silver Hand

    Silver Hand
    Southern Oregon Coast
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    OK
     
  9. Trick

    Trick
    St Helens
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    Dozens of deer, a few elk, a couple antelope. Skin as quick as you can, preferably at camp/home if you can get it out within a reasonable amount of time. Hang overnight to allow it to cool and butcher the next day. Antelope I quarter out and ice immediately and cut when I get home. If I was out of state I would butcher and freeze in camp.

    Wild game meat and salmon is way to valuable to me to chance any spoilage. I spend a bunch of my budget chasing game and it helps offset some of the cost. To risk any loss just isn't worth it.
     
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  10. 2506

    2506
    Seattle
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    You guys. There's nothing better than a properly prepared, fresh deer liver. And don't forget the kidneys. Wrap each one in par-cooked bacon, skewer it with a sprig of rosemary to hold it together, and grill it over charcoal--you can thank me later. With offal, it's always best eaten the day or evening of the kill. Get the liver, heart, kidneys soaking in ice cold water asap.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2014
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  11. pdx210

    pdx210
    Clackamas
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    I don't know about aging for flavor but hanging for a few days sure firms up the meat and makes it much easier to butcher. I've done it no problem in 50-60 degree weather 3-4 days

    Proper and timely dressing and Keeping meat clean is a priority, pulling the hide off with a winch is the best, cleanest way to do it. I always wash out with salt water, cut out any dirty or bloody meat around the bullet wound and never cut through the silver membrane covering the meat. That membrane firms up and keeps bacteria out !

    Side note I was at sportsmans in caver a few years back it was jaw dropping how nasty some of those animals come in some people have no clue.
     
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  12. salmonriverjohn

    salmonriverjohn
    N.W Oregon coast, Gods country
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    We took three nice bulls during first season elk this year, the closest to the rig was a mile and a half. Lots of quarters to pack and keep clean, old sheets work well to lay the quarters on and to wrap them in and pillow cases to put the rib, neck and back strap meat in. The weather was actually quite good for a change, below freezing most times:)
     
  13. Reacher120

    Reacher120
    Portland
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    Most of us do as we were taught during our first hunts. I hunted in edge of Wilderness area (Eagle Cap). The old timer I went with had taken a buck dear in the same meadow on opening day 28 years straight. I did also for another 5. We gutted and drug or carried 2+ miles back to camp and immediately threw in the stream to cool down for 15 minutes to 1/2 hour.( I had heard to never do this by others). Hung upside down to skin (worked great!) . Covered +wrapped during the day with sheets and old sleeping bag to keep cool, pulled bag off at night. Left hang 2-4 days most hunts, usually cut up back home in PDX unless weather was warm, then we butchered in camp and packed in coolers. Never had 'gamey" meat. The old timer said the most important things to remember, esp. Elk, was to get the meat cooled off asap (skin off helps to cool), and to keep clean. Don't know if there is a better way, but always worked for me so thats what i still do.
     
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  14. jsparks747

    jsparks747
    Portland, Or
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    I try a well known style and then start trying my own and developing a favorite method.
     

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