Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

pricecheck- Ruger Security six

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Mr.B, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. Mr.B

    Mr.B Hippyville Active Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    89
    I have the chance to purchase a used security six in stainless steel. Just want to get an idea of what a fair price is. Prices on the web seem to vary greatly for similar guns.

    It is approximately 80-85% condition. Not sure of production year (have to wait for his GF to get home to get the serial number), and does not come with original grips or box.
    I did get to fire it about 8 months ago and it seems like a solid piece.

    Any help or info would be greatly appreciated.


    B
     
  2. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,792
    Likes Received:
    597
    I can only tell you what I would be willing to pay for one, but in the condition you are describing I would pay $375 to $425 tops for either a four or six inch gun. I am sure they are people who might pay a little more, but that's what it would be worth to me. I've seen them go for as low as $325 in mechanically solid, but pretty used looking shape.

    I will say this, I have a Security Six 6" Blue that I bought in the early 80's. It's built like a tank and is a tack driver. I would not part with mine. I wouldn't worry about it not having the original grips, they aren't that great, at least mine weren't. The first thing I did was put a pair of Pachmayr's on it and they have not been off it since. I also did a poor man's trigger job on it by installing a Trapper spring kit and doing a little fluff to the action.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2011
    lowly monk and (deleted member) like this.
  3. Mr.B

    Mr.B Hippyville Active Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    89
    Thanks Cougfan. It's a 4 inch model. That's around what I was thinking price-wise. I didn't inspect it that closely at the range when I got to shoot it, but if it's as solid as I remember, I'm definitely going to try to scoop it up.
     
  4. orygun

    orygun West Linn Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    3,774
    Likes Received:
    1,961
    Stainless 4" Security Six... you didn't say if it was 38 Special or 357 Mag, but if it's a 357 it should be worth $400. I'd pay that for one.
     
  5. ORHunter79

    ORHunter79 ... Active Member

    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    58
    I traded a Glock 26 for one at 95% maybe higher. No regrets here, though I can get another new Glock 26 for $398.
     
  6. Mr.B

    Mr.B Hippyville Active Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    89
    Man, I'm just not on the ball today at all. Forgot barrel length and caliber....insert facepalm here. It is a 357.

    Thanks for all the input! I'm currently waiting to hear back from the guy so I can make arrangements to inspect it and hopefully purchase it.
     
  7. nubus

    nubus Guest

    I'll have to agree with everyone else. I'd pay $400 for one. Great gun. Solid and reliable. Ruger revolvers are good at holding their value and commonly sell above published values. At least that's been my experience, and I've owned a "few."
     
  8. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    Likes Received:
    1,175
    My favorite 357 and I own 3 or 4 and would pay up to $400 for one, but would never sell any of the ones I have.
     
  9. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    7,664
    Here is a very good review regarding these pistols:

    Ruger Security-Six .357 Magnum Revolver

    By David Tong


    Sturm, Ruger & Co. has always been a bit of a dichotomy of a gun company. They use the most modern of manufacturing methods, that of precision investment casting, much as would a jeweler or dental lab, to provide a near-final-sized raw part which thus requires a minimum of machining to become a completed arm. While doing so however, they have embraced neo-classic aesthetics in their arms; examples include the their Blackhawk single-action revolvers, the M77 bolt action and No. 1 fallling block sporting rifles and the Gold Label side-by-side shotguns.

    In the early 1970s, when the double-action revolver was still the preference of most US law enforcement agencies, Ruger did not have a weapon to compete for this market, nor for civilian home protection users. They rectified this in 1972 with the introduction of the Security Six and Speed Six revolvers, building both of regular blued, carbon steel as well as their proprietary Terhune stainless steel. Security Sixes were generally .357s and had adjustable rear sights, while Speed Sixes were fixed sight guns that were made primarily in .357, but also in .38 S&W Special and 9mm Luger.

    Both were so-called “medium-frame” revolvers, in much the same vein as a Smith & Wesson K-frame, or the Colt D-frame, exemplified by the Diamondback. However, the Ruger engineers took a good look at the competition’s designs and followed another path to ensure the new gun’s durability.

    First, the engineers bulked up key frame dimensions, including the height of the frame, the thickness of the top strap and barrel shank support and the cylinder diameter. They also offset the locking bolt notches on the cylinder to provide added strength to that most-thin area of each chamber.

    They comprehensively looked at the sometimes fragile and hand fitted lockwork of these designs, and in usual Ruger fashion, over-engineered all the working parts. If one were to do a comparison detail strip of a Smith, Colt and the Ruger, one would see that pieces such as the cylinder locking bolt, the hand, the size of the double and single-action sears on the hammer, one would see that the Ruger pieces are quite a bit larger.

    In addition, the Ruger folks incorporated a transfer bar firing system. While both S&W and Colt used rebounding hammers to provide a drop safety scheme and S&W had added the sliding hammer block in 1943 to WWII production “Victory Models” and subsequently carried this change into civilian production post-war, Ruger felt that the use of a rising "transfer bar" of steel interposed between the flat-faced hammer and the frame-mounted firing pin was even safer. Only when the trigger was fully-depressed in a firing stroke would the transfer bar rise and allow hammer to strike it and “transfer” that impact to the rear of the firing pin, discharging the chambered round.

    Ruger arms are also made of very good, fully heat treated steels. This means long component life. The frame itself dispensed with the usual side-plate design and the piece is easily “field-stripped” for detail cleaning of the lockwork.

    The downside to this shooter is that the double-action stroke is problematic. Colt’s hand fitting and S&W’s selective-assembly methods meant that revolvers were fitted to the dimensional accuracy of the trigger and hammer pin locations on the frame. While this added to the cost of production, it means that the finished arm generally needs no trigger action job to make the stroke smooth from front to back.

    The Ruger has notable glitches in its DA pull. While I admire the way their engineers over-built the revolver’s internals, and knowing that they were attempting to bulldoze their way into the marketplace via cost competitiveness by eliminating hand work, in my opinion the Security Six is a “single-action revolver capable of double-action firing.” Generally, the single-action pull is nothing to write home about either, usually at least four pounds with some creep, compared to the 2-3 pound triggers standard on period Colts or Smiths.

    However, most shooters were willing to accept this for the strength and price paid. At its introduction, the Colt Trooper was sold for $161, while the Smith M19 went for $143 and the Ruger retailed for $121.

    Thirty years on and a good used Security Six can be had in the lower $300 price range. I’ve fitted mine with the “Reduced” weight spring package from Wolff Springs, yet the DA pull must still be at least 14 pounds, with the aforementioned glitches. A prior owner had taken the factory walnut “target” stocks and cut finger-grooves into their front and reduced their overall girth, making them suitable for smaller hands, but very slippery with the not-inconsiderable recoil of a full-house .357 round. I will probably have to fit other stocks affording me a more secure grip, as it squirms beyond my ability to hold it consistently.

    Ruger chambers are usually a bit oversized, easing extraction when dirty, if compromising case life somewhat. They are also usually razor-edged at the rear of the cylinder, requiring a light chamfer to ease the use of speedloaders.

    However, and this is the real reason why these guns are a solid buy, they will simply out last any other DA revolver over thousands of Magnum rounds. (With the exception, of course, of Ruger’s follow-on piece, the GP-100.) If one bought a Security Six, one could expect a lifetime of full use and still be able to hand it to one’s children with nary a problem. I once knew of an indoor range that had one as a rental gun and it digested, by their estimate, some 1,400,000 rounds with no parts breakages and minimal maintenance. That is the essence of a good deal!
     
  10. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    Likes Received:
    1,175

    I also have a Colt Python and S&W 29 and as much as I am told how great the action is supposed to be on these guns, each of my Security Six has a better trigger than the S&W and if the Python is smoother, it is by so little that I really have a hard time telling.
    Maybe I just got lucky and every one of these had a trigger job. (???)
     
  11. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Likes Received:
    836
    Plus one, plus two, plus three for all those praising this gun. Mine is a blue 6" .357. Digests all loads, supremely accurate, and with five trips to Alaska, bulletproof durable.

    Shooting Times magazine (probably February 1974, since that was when I was in boot camp and bought the issue), did a comparison test between the Smith 19, Colt's Python, and the Ruger Security Six. Guess who won the accuracy tests (not with every bullet/load, but an overwhelming majority of them)?

    Sorry Smith and Colt's fans (I'm a colt collector, so this was somewhat disappointing to me). Ruger by more than a nose. I bought mine shortly thereafter, and shook off my brief disappointment about the Python's showing.

    Recently, I've seen the stainless ones go for $300- $350. Usually advertised toward the $400 range. At any price, you cannot go wrong.
     
  12. Misterbill

    Misterbill Yakima County, Washington New Member

    Messages:
    1,308
    Likes Received:
    1,013
    For stainless in 85% condition I'd go up to $450.

    The Security sixes are simply outstanding guns which don't need a trigger job and will last you a lifetime. I just had an 85-year-old woman shooting controlled pairs double-action last week keeping up with all the guys with semi-autos. (She's a natural and put in groups solid into the thoracic cavity at 21 feet from a modified weaver stance).

    The 4-inchers are harder to come by, hence worth a tad more than the more common 6-inch variety.
     
  13. Mr.B

    Mr.B Hippyville Active Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    89
    Finally met up with the seller today and bought it. Turns out it's a 2-3/4 inch barrel with a Pachmayr grip. Better condition than I remember, and got a good deal on it. The serial number puts it at approximately a 1983 manufacture date.
    Thanks again for all the info. I was leaning towards buying it already, then with all the loyal fans this model seems to have, it became a no-brainer.


    B
     
  14. ORHunter79

    ORHunter79 ... Active Member

    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    58
    Congratulations. I have to say, since I've bought my 2.75" Security Six I've shot it a lot, well about 150 rounds. This thing so much fun to shoot. Shooting full power loads is no problem. Next on my list is the buffalo bore 180 (suggested by someone on this forum). Enjoy your "new" revolver and DON'T FORGET TO POST PICS!!!!!
     
  15. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,792
    Likes Received:
    597
    Congrats. You will enjoy that pistol. 2 3/4" Security Six's are seen less frequently on the market than the 4" or 6" pistols. You will find that Security Six's are addictive. Once you get one, you want more. I have passed up a couple of 4" blued guns that I can kick myself for not snapping up. My 6" is lonely sitting in the safe by itself.

    I've been wanting a 4" or 3 3/4" Speed Six for a while so I keep my eye out for a good one, but they're harder to find than the Security Six's. I guess I'll have to do with my SP101 for now. It's my second favorite carry piece.

    DSCN0758-1-1.jpg
     
  16. Mr.B

    Mr.B Hippyville Active Member

    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    89

    I am thrilled to have this one in my collection. I've shot it before, but I still can't wait to get it out to the range. I'll get some pics up soon.
    I already own a 3" taurus 357, and the ruger is much heavier. It just feels like a much better pistol. Funny thing is, I've never considered myself a big revolver guy(or stainless for that matter). But I got the taurus so cheap I couldn't pass it up, shot it and liked it quite a bit. Then a buddy told me this ruger was for sale, and decided I had to have it. My how things change!

    On a different note...is that porting on top of the barrel of your sp101? Nice looking pistol!
     
  17. Cougfan2

    Cougfan2 Hillsboro, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,792
    Likes Received:
    597
    I have to admit, although my go to carry pieces for years have been 1911's I love classic revolvers. I have had several and I regret selling every one I ever sold, especially my Dan Wesson 15-2, the most accurate handgun I've ever owned. Still looking for a 6" blue Colt Python. I have seen several for sale thru the years that I would have loved to have, but the timing or available funds were never right. It's the holy grail of revolvers for me.

    Yes, that is porting on the SP101. I had that pistol done by Gemini Customs. Marco is probably known more for his 1911 work, but the Hybra Port packages for Ruger and S&W revolvers are really cool. I love mine. I just pray I never have to shoot it in an enclosed area without hearing protection. While the Hybra Porting really reduces muzzle flip, especially for full house .357 loads, it is freaking LOUD!
     
  18. madcratebuilder

    madcratebuilder Ardenwald, OR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,278
    Likes Received:
    175
    Not more than $350. $400-450 well get a 95% or better stianless DA Six. Look at completed sales on Gunbroker.

    The 2.75" is the most desirable of the DA Sixes and this was $350 two years ago.
    SecurityS01.jpg
    I have two sets of grips now and it's worth more than average because of the very hard to find Ruger target grips.
    PICT0002-2.jpg


    With some horse trading I'm in this about $150, it's worth maybe $425 with two sets of grips.
    ServiceS02.jpg

    It had a few scratches in the finish so I polished it out and removed the "bill board" from the left side of the barrel.

    ss01jpg.jpg




    ETA.

    That's a much better deal, congrats on the 2.75, nice shooters.
     
  19. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    7,664
    Talking about the differences between Colt's "Python" and Ruger's "Security Six" reminds me of my first wife and her award winning horse.
    When I married her, she owned an Arabian show horse. One of the most beautiful and highly trained animals I have ever seen. Problem was, she was only good for parading around inside an arena. Take her outside and a falling leaf or a mud puddle would spook her so bad she would jump sideways in a blink of an eye, and being a beginner rider, I would always end up on the ground.
    So the first wife decides that I need a horse to ride on, and she drags home a free 29 year old mare that has six brands on her, called "Old Mamma".
    She was used as a comfort mare for a stud, and was abandoned when the people who owned her moved back to California. She had lice, worms, bloated belly and was all skin and bones.
    After a lot of care and feeding, she started looking better except for the bloated belly. One morning I enter her stall and find the nicest little filly foal standing there. We couldn't believe that old mare, without a peep gave birth in the middle of the night.
    Not a bad looker if you don't mind missing teeth, grey hair and a swaying backbone that looks like a picket fence.
    Out in the pasture standing side by side, you couldn't picture two different looking horses, but put a saddle on "Old Mamma" and you had the steadiest, sure footed, happiest, dependable and willing to do anything, anywhere horse, and I suspect that was the reason she had so many brands.
    I own two .357's. One is a mint 6" high polish stainless steel Python that has only 6 rounds through it. I take it out of the box and look at it every so often.
    The other, is a 4" Security Six that I shoot as often as I can. Accurate, rugged, built to last a lifetime and with a set of Pachmayr Decelerator grips, a pleasure to shoot.
    A valuable safe queen like my Python is a nice investment, but the Ruger "Six" is by far the best investment you can make.
     
  20. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    Likes Received:
    1,175
    Thumbs up for the horse story, but the Security Six is not an ugly piece. Maybe if you got one that spent its like under the bench seat of a farm pickup truck.