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My first 1000!

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by DootyBeet, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. DootyBeet

    DootyBeet Salem Member

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    Ok, Maybe I'm too impressed with myself as all you re-loaders have all been there, but I finished my first 1000 re-loads today. I definately got better with each 100, less and less mistakes. It helps to have compressed air close by to blow away gun powder particles which can get caught under the turret after a missed primer.
    Thanks for everyone's help with prior questions.
    I have another now... I didn't think about this when I took a class a year ago, but when instructed to slowly work up your loads, that presents a logical problem unless I'm missing something.
    I started with 10% over the minimum powder charge. If I were to test fire and slowly work up, how would I know that enough is enough without some sort of catistrophic failure? Yead, each load would be hotter than the previous, but you'd eventually become too hot. What am I missing?

    Not sure it makes any difference, but I loaded .223 rem on a 650xl
     
  2. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    You must carefully examine fired cases for pressure signs as your loads become hotter. ie: Primer condition, case head expansion, difficulty in extraction, etc. Maximum load for your gun can be easily established, then back off a bit.
    Be careful to record your results and the weather conditions under which they occur. Temperature can really add to high (and low) pressure results, too.
    Was this not part of your class?
     
  3. Throckmorton

    Throckmorton Florence,Ore ah gone Well-Known Member

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    what you are looking for is the load that is most accurate in your gun.Max loads are seldom the most accurate,and Min loads are just plain wimpy and not much fun to shoot...lol...but can be the most accurate.
    In short,you're not 'working up loads' for power,but for accuacy.
     
  4. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Great advice motoman98. Thanks for all the help you started me with some .. was it 20yrs ago?
     
  5. DootyBeet

    DootyBeet Salem Member

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    Thanks for the advice. I take it, from Motoman, that if careful, the casing should experience a problem well before the firearm?
     
  6. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I agree with all above and follow it. I still always say that I wouldn't reload without a chronograph. What good does it do me to have a very accurate load at 100 yds which leaves my case looking great if the bullet speed in my AR-15 is 500 fps slower than a factory load?

    My routine is to try to get the best accuracy I can while still holding really good bullet speed. Bullet speed translates to shocking power, and for rifles at least, better long distance flight characteristics - "bullet drop" - so long as accuracy is achieved.

    IIRC a factory round in 5.56 XM193 55 gr has a muzzle velocity of about 3150 fps. I want all of that and even a bit more if it works out well. Even if my memory about the speed sucks this morning, it doesn't change the point. I don't want to build wimpy, accurate 100 yd loads which leave beautiful cases.

    $.02

    PS My routine if I get a new gun or a new batch of powder and primers or a different bullet shape is to find out what factory muzzle velocity is and work up to that, watching the condition of my cases. If I don't already know what my overall cartridge length should be for that rifle and bullet, I figure it out and set my bullets back .020 from the riflings. Once I have my OAL and bullet speed and am secure that my cases are looking good, only then do I start tuning for accuracy.

    All of this work is why I always buy matched once fired brass, bullets, primers and powder in bulk, and never load in batches of less than 1,000.

    $.02
     
  7. Taurus 617 CCW

    Taurus 617 CCW Northern Idaho Member

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    The Nosler reloading guide has an asterisk (*) in each load category as the most accurate load tested. I find that very helpful and a good starting place.