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We're having a discussion elsewhere about how to prove you owned "High Capacity" magazines prior to Measure 114's passage, if it ends up passing. I have some thoughts, but I'd like to hear some other brilliant ideas.

I've already thought or heard about taking them to your lawyer and having an affidavit filled out and signed by witnesses. I wonder about how solid the proof would be if you just uploaded photos of them here or to some other forum, where the upload date and time are recorded, or maybe just to any cloud server?
 
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Your method is similar to mine. My mags are also numbered so I can identify the problem children and I can imagine having photo evidence of numbered mags with several witnesses signing legal statements it should be pretty bulletproof
 
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Normally, until and unless someone is charged with a violation, they will not have "standing" to constitutionally challenge the clearly vague and unenforceable law. However, being denied the purchase of such places you in this class.

In the meantime, I am negotiating the purchase of a North Korean mini-sub to smuggle mags into the Evergreennewdeal State. Might as well buy mags from North Korea, as they are more likely to be legal there than in Washington or Oregon.

I think this is an environmental issue. It will now take twice the electricity and polymer to manufacture double the mags mags with half the capacity. I can just sense the carbon big toe already pressing on me.
 
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I've always thought I'd lay my mags out and take a picture or three of them. Type a letter saying I owned these as of XXX date. Make sure it shows in the photos. Take a set of the photos and mail them to yourself but DO NOT OPEN IT when it arrives. Mail two or three copies. If it ever becomes an issue, you can take the sealed and postmarked envelope to a judge who can open it, see the postmark, see the letter, and see your mags. Should do it; in the music business, we used the "poor mans copyright" by mailing ourselves a cassette of music, leaving it sealed, and throwing it in safe keeping. Unless there is real fire brewing, this should take care of the issue. One man's opinion.....
 
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I'm one that doesn't believe in providing information (evidence) or documentation that isn't required by law. If there is a way to use it against you, they'll find it. IE., If you fail to document even one, the question arises, if you were careful enough to document the majority, failing to document them all may give them the argument that it must be a post ban item.

Are the markings permanent and there is no possibility of them being altered or worn away at some point and time and no longer "documented"? If some get lost or thrown out due to failure or such, how will you prove what happened to them? Did you illegally sell them to someone?? ;)

The burden is on the state to prove any violation. Otherwise, a sworn statement is legally binding and you have in your favor that... since it is illegal to sell them, it''s reasonable that you had no means to obtain any, post ban.

Creating an "alibi" when it's not typical behavior to do so can in and of itself appear suspicious.

If it ever even became necessary I rather leave the ball in their court to try and prove my sworn statement is false. YMMV
 
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I'm one that doesn't believe in providing information (evidence) or documentation that isn't required by law. If there is a way to use it against you, they'll find it. IE., If you fail to document even one, the question arises, if you were careful enough to document the majority, failing to document them all may give them the argument that it must be a post ban item.

Are the markings permanent and there is no possibility of them being altered or worn away at some point and time and no longer "documented"? If some get lost or thrown out due to failure or such, how will you prove what happened to them? Did you illegally sell them to someone?? ;)

The burden is on the state to prove any violation. Otherwise, a sworn statement is legally binding and you have in your favor that... since it is illegal to sell them, it''s reasonable that you had no means to obtain any, post ban.

Creating an "alibi" when it's not typical behavior to do so can in and of itself appear suspicious.

If it ever even became necessary I rather leave the ball in their court to try and prove my sworn statement is false. YMMV
My assumption would be that they would have to prove you didn't own them before the ban? I agree with @Yarome
 
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We've gone through this mental exercise before when the Wash. mag ban came along. I'm now in agreement with those who think you don't have to prove anything; it's up to the authorities to prove you did wrong. The main function of these laws as I see it is to curtail new sales by retail vendors. Documentation never hurts, but you're not likely to need it. Not yet, anyway. I like the post above where someone said something like, "You've got the mags now, so you must've bought them before the ban. Otherwise you would've been breaking the law."
 

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