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I love beans and rice and the pressure cooker makes short work of beans, no soaking necessary. Takes about an hour, add some creole seasoning, and voila.
Pressure cookers are great. We use an instapot here at home. I keep an old school pressure cooker at cabin to use on camp stove. I would be hesitant to try using pressure cooker over campfire but I am sure it could be done.
 
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I measured it with whatever they call those power meter things. Once it heats up and pressurizes, it uses around 3 watts for most of the time. I should've written it down, but quite the energy savings over a crock pot. I had never considered a campfire pressure cooker... off to the overlord I go. Well, maybe just bring the inverter and run off the car battery. So then for backpacking, that brine solution you posted sounds like the way to go.
 
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I measured it with whatever they call those power meter things. Once it heats up and pressurizes, it uses around 3 watts for most of the time. I should've written it down, but quite the energy savings over a crock pot. I had never considered a campfire pressure cooker... off to the overlord I go.
My thoughts on speeding up cooking was in regards to grid down food prepartion. Portable electricity may be very precious and better saved for charging small electronics, lighting, etc.
 
Pressure cookers are great. We use an instapot here at home. I keep an old school pressure cooker at cabin to use on camp stove. I would be hesitant to try using pressure cooker over campfire but I am sure it could be done.
I wouldn't have any issue using a small stove top pressure cooker over a campfire/wood fired rocket stove/wood coal bed.

Haven't done so, but would likely just take a bit more watching is all. Along with some common sense.
 
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I'll have to give it a try. I've made a few dishes utilizing dry beans and half the time the beans just don't get soft. Even after soaking over night and dropping them in the slow cooker for 10 hours.
 
I usually just put the beans in a pot with water covering about 3" then bring to a light boil. When boil is present remove from heat and let sit for about an hour or two, rinse them then start cooking. They do expand pretty well that's why I have the extra 3" of water, I do this with chili red beans or navy beans for soup. I dont add salt to the water because I don't want the extra salt cause the cardiologist would give me the stink eye.
 
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My wife loves shredded beef, chicken, pork, and pork ribs.
My instapot gets frequent use.
- 7 lbs chicken breasts cover 1 1/2” piceswith seasoned water, on high pressure for 20 min, let cool and shred, save all liquid for broth for soup,
- Same thing for pork tenderloin but 25 min and save broth for pressure cooking beans.
- Same for beef (cheapest cuts) saving broth for soups again.

I pack shedded meat in 1 1/2 lb freezer bags for use in things like Enchiladas/burritos/sandwiches/soups/hash, etc and also freeze the broths in quart containers.

In the summer we like the shredded chicken on a salad.
- Ribs are pressure cooked for 15 min before placing in a large pan to finish with bbq sauce in the oven

I still have my old pressure cooker for use on the bbq side-burner or hot coals from a camp fire. (Make sure you have extra seals and safety plugs they tend to deteriorate in storage)
 
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One of my 1st jobs was Del Taco in 1981. Beans came in a 50lb sack and we had to separate actual rocks 🪨 from the beans. Rinse them then put them in the "mother of all", giant pressure cookers. I don't know how long they cooked because we could only work 4hrs max. They were never done when I was there.
 

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