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7.62x39 ammo advice needed

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by hackercat13, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. hackercat13

    hackercat13 Steilacoom, WA Active Member

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    Hey,
    For all you with a fair bit more experience with Russian weapons, I need a bit of advice. I have mainly shot Golden Tiger and Uly through my SKS and my AK, but both seem a bit scarce right now. I have also shot a bit of Wolf, my Russian ladies are not fussy, but I want to avoid corrosive primers. My best choices from my usual online sources seem to be Brown Bear and Tulammo. Which would you recommend and why? Is there any real difference at this grade of ammo?
    Thanks!
    Chris
     
  2. olydemon

    olydemon Olympia Active Member

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    I don't know much of the differences, but Surplus Ammo and Arms has had plenty of non corrosive Russian ammo in stock the last few trips there.
     
  3. hackercat13

    hackercat13 Steilacoom, WA Active Member

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    Really? I was there last week, all they had was the 640 sealed spam cans. I called them today, nada! That's why I am thinking of going online. Ayone else local with a good supply? I think all cabella's carries is Herters.
     
  4. Unka-Boo

    Unka-Boo Milwaukie Active Member

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    To the best of my knowledge, the only currently available ammo that would be corrosive is Yugo M67. All of the commercial stuff is non-corrosive.
     
  5. olydemon

    olydemon Olympia Active Member

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    Wow, really? I was there 2 weeks ago and they had a ton of the black and white box stuff. I picked up 5 loose box, but right below on the shelf they had a stack of them... or I assumed so. I just checked their website too and it seems they have taken off the Russian stuff and now only have the brass case YugoM67.

    Wholesale sports over at Hawks Prarie had some Tula HP for 4.59 and I got a couple boxes, but havent shot it. I have shot tons of the Herters stuff through my Norinco Mak90 with no problems at all.

    Ive never ordered from Copes, but a friend has. He sent me this link the other day and my response was ... "meh, I'll just get it from SAA", guess its time to try some online buying...

    Cope's Distributing
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2011
  6. hackercat13

    hackercat13 Steilacoom, WA Active Member

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    I know! I was at SAA about 7-8 days ago, quite a bit of ULY (black and white box) sitting there. Went back a few days later, cobwebs! I have heard nothing but inconsistant results about Herters, so I will probably avoid it, or maybe shoot a box or to...mainly was hoping someone who had shot Tulammo would chime in.
     
  7. jib

    jib Central OR Active Member

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    My SKS has a chromed barrel I clean the bore and action after I shoot it, Corrosive primed ammo does not worry me, this gun was made to shoot it.
    If shooting corrosive primed ammo it would be a good to clean the gas system after as well.
     
  8. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Most of the "corrosive" ammo today is really mild compared to what was available up to and through WWII. Regular cleaning to include the gas system will prevent any damage from the mildly corrosive ammo you will encounter today. A bottle of Windex can be your friend as the ammonia will neutralize the corrosive effects. It's not like you will shoot some corrosive ammo on Monday and have holes in your firearm by Friday. It takes time for the effects to establish themselves.

    The biggest thing is to just clean and oil regularly. But then that's a good idea even if you are shooting non-corrosive.
     
  9. hackercat13

    hackercat13 Steilacoom, WA Active Member

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    I have never shot corrosive ammo through my firearms, and probably will avoid it, but this is good info. So windex neutrilizes or removes the residue that is corrosive? Good to know. Any other tips?
    Chris
     
  10. HappyRoman

    HappyRoman Sherwood Forest Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    after shooting corrosive ammo, clean the bore with warm soapy water, blow all the water away, wd the entire piece well to make sure all the water is gone, then clean as usual. Will work well. I have most of an ammo can of 7.62x39 available, it's import, but says non-corrosive, would sell 20rd box for $6, 10x box's for $57.50, 20x boxes for $110, and all for $5.30/bx.
     
  11. hackercat13

    hackercat13 Steilacoom, WA Active Member

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    Where are you located? I am assuming NOT in Merry ole' England!
     
  12. ogre

    ogre Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Chris Windex, per se, is not a magic bullet that neutralizes the salts left from corrosive powder or primers. It is the WATER in the Windex that washes away the salts. The ammonia in the Windex has no effect on them. Windex comes it's in a spray bottle, and you can take it anywhere, so it is really handy in the field or at the range.

    After firing corrosive ammunition I clean my rifles at home with plenty of hot water to wash away the salts, followed by my regular cleaning with Ed's Red.

    I have never suffered rust from corrosive ammo.
     
  13. ogre

    ogre Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I really like Golden Tiger ammunition in 7.62x39mm and have stockpiled it in case of a dearth. Because I pretty much think it's the best I rate the rest of the affordable ammo as all pretty much the same; good but not great, except for Wolf.

    I'm not too keen on Wolf ammo but I like their magnum rifle primers just fine.
     
  14. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Most corrosive elements from primers are in the acid realm. Ammonia is a "base" and does neutralize to a certain amount those particles left behind. Yes, water does a good job but he ammonia is an added benefit.

    As for shooting corrosive ammo, I have a 1903 A3 "sporter" with the original barrel dated 10-42. It's shot more than its share of corrosive ammo and with proper cleaning, the bore is today still able to shoot 2" groups at 300 yards.
     
  15. Ownerus

    Ownerus South Clackamas Co. Active Member

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    I'm no chemist but I don't think the residue of corrosive primers is acidic. It's a salt and hygroscopic to boot. Like was posted earlier, it's water that dissolves and removes the salts. WWII GI bore cleaner had ammonia in it but I think the it's real function, as with Windex, is as a grease/oil cutting agent. It cuts the grease so that the water can do it's work. Same thing the soap does when using hot soapy water for cleaning which is very effective on corrosive ammo residue.

    I've used lots of corrosive ammo over the years with no problems. Just remember to clean all parts touched by fouling (bolt face, gas system etc.) promptly with something containing water, dry thoroughly, and oil lightly afterward.
     
  16. ogre

    ogre Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Spot on!
     
  17. Browncoat

    Browncoat Clackamas, Or. Member

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    Yugo corrosive surplus, $259.00 delivered for 1260 from Ammoman.com. Just treat your gun with Gunzilla CLP and clean after shooting.
    Keep shooting, Jim
     
  18. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Yes salts. But salts that when they come in contact with water, form acids. Since air contains high quantities of moisture, the salts draw the water vapor to them.

    Everyone commenting has a piece of the "puzzle". Water will dissolve the salts. The ammonia has a neutralizing effect for the acids that may have already formed and worked their way into any micro cracks in the bore. It also dissolves the grease and oils that might be "binding" the "salts" in place. and because it's Windex, it's readily available and far cheaper than the ammoniated oils like Sweet's. The most common "salt" in corrosive primers is Potassium Chloride (KCL) and when it is added to water the "solution" becomes slightly acidic. Another factor is the liberation of Oxygen from the water by the Chlorine Ion.

    All "chemistry" aside, as said earlier. Clean and oil, regardless of whether you shoot some corrosive primer'd ammo.
     
  19. Ownerus

    Ownerus South Clackamas Co. Active Member

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    I think the main reason for ammonia in bore cleaners is not to neutralize acid but to attack copper fouling. I'm thinking that if you needed to neutralize acids, baking soda would be a better choice than ammonia. I must re-emphasize, clean up corrosive ammo residue with WATER or something water based. Just because a bore cleaner contains ammonia doesn't mean it's good for corrosive ammo. Hoppes #9 for example contains ammonia but won't suffice for cleaning corrosive ammo. Back in the '60s when USGI WWII surplus ammo was cheap and common, guys got into trouble when they fired GI .30-06 and then cleaned the way they always had with Hoppes because they didn't know any better. Good old hot soapy water has always worked fine for corrosive ammo. Ammonia may also help in neutralizing but the main active agent against corrosive residue is water.
     
  20. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    And just happens to also be the major component in Windex:)