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To vacuum pack or not to vacuum pack loose ammo?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by BigCat, Nov 16, 2010.

  1. BigCat

    BigCat Portland Member

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    Discuss.
     
  2. Dell_dude

    Dell_dude Vancouver, WA Member

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    Vacuum pack? No.

    I can them.

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  3. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    Overrated. Round nose will be easier and the tip of FMJ rifle ammo will Peirce the plastic bag. You will need to use thin peices of cardboard to cover the sharp tips.

    I found a bag of 7.62x39 ammo loosely wrapped in a goat skin cloth also wrapped in a burlap bag. My afghan soldiers suspected it was a Mujhaden cache from the 80's and the fight against the Russians. It went bang.

    I would can it. Wolf/golden tiger/Tula can be packed 1600 rds per fat .50.

    SF
     
    wjjones2 and (deleted member) like this.
  4. Dr.Z

    Dr.Z Vancouver/Metro Member

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    +1!!! :thumbup::thumbup:
    Completely agree! can it
     
  5. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    Wouldn't vacuum pack it unless I was planning on burying it. And since I don't plan on burying any guns or ammo (yet), I also store mine in cans...
     
  6. dave

    dave Independence Member

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    I can also.
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    But I do vacuum pack 100 rounds of 9mm for the GHB. It takes up less space and makes little to no noise.
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    Last edited: Nov 16, 2010
  7. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    A 'friend of mine' does that for his GHB, that's how I found out about the pointed vs. round nose, but he vacume packs 15 rounds at a time so when needs to tear into a bag he has fewer rounds that are loose and flopping around.

    SF-
     
  8. Wenis

    Wenis Tri-Cities, WA Member

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    OOH OOH! IDEA: Vacuum pack 1 bag, but crease a seal for every number of rounds that fit into your carry magazine. That way when you have to tear into it, the rest stays sealed.

    Okay, you can now revel in my brilliance.
     
  9. Trlsmn

    Trlsmn In Utero (Portland) Well-Known Member

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    I like the direction this thread is going!
     
  10. 44magyota

    44magyota oregon Member

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    So do I.....now all we need to do is convice Trlsmn to vacume pack all his delicious looking meals and ship them to me....for proper disposal :D
     
  11. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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  12. matt_w

    matt_w Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    For the GHB wouldn't it be better to just store them in magazines?
     
  13. Dell_dude

    Dell_dude Vancouver, WA Member

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    That's my :twocents: as well.

    At least that's how it'll be until my Glocks are able to feed plastic bags. :p
     
  14. tallshipsgo

    tallshipsgo Springfield OR Well-Known Member

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    As long as you rotate the mags every once in awhile. I’ve seen mags loaded and stored for extended periods end up with compressed springs that didn’t play nice when finally used.

    IMO if you’re planning on long term storage of magazines with the ammo then break them down, mark the bottom front of the spring (for orientation in the magazine when you reassemble it) and store them in zip lock bags.

    Back to the original topic now I suppose: I can mine. I'd thought about vacuum sealing but it's a pain and ammo stored dry should be fine for years. I found a couple of cans of 9mm that I got 15 years ago and totally forgot about. They still look great and shoot just fine. If you're concerned about moisture then get some desiccant packs to throw in the can.
     
  15. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    No, you're doing the opposite of what you should be doing. We've been over and over this here. So long as a spring stays static within its design range, it will not wear out. That's fully loaded, half loaded or empty.

    It's cycling the spring that wears it out - say from full to empty and back.

    You can leave a mag loaded for 100 years and if kept in a good climate so it doesn't rust, the spring will be just a strong as the day it was loaded.

    Cliff
     
  16. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Back on topic, does anyone see any ammo here? I sure see plenty when I see an ammo can.

    Right in this pic I see 5,000 rounds of M193 5.56, 10,000 rounds of .22lr and 2,000 rounds of .40 S&W.

    It isn't in it's final resting place, it's just dumped onto and in front of a shelf just as I got it.

    Cliff


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  17. Dell_dude

    Dell_dude Vancouver, WA Member

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    It's not like I leave the cans out where they're easily visible. You'd be searching the house if you found them, which means either I have a breach, or I bugged out and left some.

    Now if I could just get my step daughter (who thinks it's funny) to stop telling people.

    Maybe she doesn't realize that I mean it when I say "the only people you should tell about that are people you want to see dead, because if they come here for it, that's what's happening".
     
  18. tallshipsgo

    tallshipsgo Springfield OR Well-Known Member

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    Not in my experience. I've seen this happen with 1911, Glock and AK mags. Theory is wonderful but practical application and experience wins out for me.

    Cycling any mechanical object over and over will wear it out. The worst thing you can do to a car is turn it on for example. The point is not to use it but use it and take precautions to help minimize problems.

    I’m glad that topic has been covered before but I seriously doubt that a few people that respond to a post on a regional board can cover the entire experience of pretty much anything. It’s folly to make a blanket statement that if you do such and such that the end result will be, ever time, the same when it comes to mechanical devices. There are far too many variances in manufacture and material to be able to reasonably make such statements.

    It doesn’t make any sense not to take a precaution to minimize fatigue on something when it takes all of 30 seconds to reassemble said item.
     
  19. Sasquatchvnv

    Sasquatchvnv Port Orchard Active Member

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    If it's time to bury it - it's time to dig it up...

    Yep - .50 cans all day long. Only thing better is canned, loaded mags.
     
  20. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Science wins out for me.

    So long as a spring remains static within its design limits (Neither compressed or stretched beyond the amounts it was designed for) it will not lose strength.

    Only cycling, or some oddity such as rust or extreme heat, can wear out a spring.

    One more time. You can leave a magazine fully loaded for 100 years and the spring will be no weaker than when you loaded it. Repeatedly cycling a spring from its design compression limit to an unloaded state will wear it out after enough cycles.

    I replace the main spring in my semi-auto weapons and the springs in the magazines every 2,000 rounds without regard to time or to whether they were left compressed or uncompressed, and that method is correct unless the gun manufacturer calls for fewer cycles before replacing.