Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

removing buildup and fouling...

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by Koda, May 2, 2016.

  1. Koda

    Koda Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    2,196
    Likes Received:
    3,010
    what is the easiest way to remove buildup and fouling like this? This new bolt is nickel boron coated and I didn’t want to scrape it and Hopps 9 wasn’t getting it done...

    0501161953b.jpg
     
  2. Doc In UPlace

    Doc In UPlace Tacoma-ish Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,644
    Likes Received:
    2,032
    I have a bronze toothbrush that I use for stuff like that. The nickel boron will be much harder than the bronze, so scrub away.
     
  3. Koda

    Koda Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    2,196
    Likes Received:
    3,010
    good to know as I have a bronze toothbrush too, just wanted to make certain with the fancy new bolt...
     
  4. OutlawHoss

    OutlawHoss Klamath-Siskyou Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    645
    Likes Received:
    1,146
    I'm not absolutely positive about use with Nickel boron, but a kerosene based fouling solvent can get just about everything off, it just takes time. I've brought back some pretty abused and neglected parts with at minimum an overnight soak. I can't remember a brand name, but looking at non-ammonia based firearm cleaners will get some results. Also, there are ready made kits, as well as DIY instructions online to use electrolysis. The newest option would be the ultra-sound units which are expensive, but worth it if you find yourself restoring a lot of parts in such condition.

    Edit: I was assuming you had tried the simpler methods of brushing or scrubbing; definitely a bronze brush or steel wool are the first and easiest methods. If it's not satisfactory though, then definitely soak it or 'escalate' your use of force otherwise. I've heard people even use ATF (tranny fluid) with great results too.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2016
  5. PDX1953

    PDX1953 Active Member

    Messages:
    166
    Likes Received:
    106
    I belong to the 1911 Owners forum on FB & the Admin swears by Gunslick Foaming Bore Cleaner. It goes on white but turns blue when it's done eating away the hardened carbon, lead & copper in a barrel. Bi-Mart sells a 3 oz. can for $9.99 but Amazon sells a 12 oz. can for $11.99. I have Prime so shipping is N/C.

    I've also used Miracle Cloths that are coated with coconut oil. I took all the powder rings off the front of a SS cylinder with minor effort & it looked brand new when I was done. Even after the cloth turns black it still works great.

    I bought 3 for $11.25 so send Gary Schmitt an email for more info.
    garyschmitt@bellsouth.net
     
    Sgt Nambu and etrain16 like this.
  6. clearconscience

    clearconscience Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,590
    Likes Received:
    7,142
    I soak mine in solvent and then scrub it with a brass brush.
    But the was a phosphate bcg. It's a B to get all that stuff off.

    So much for nickel boron! It's supposed to be easy to clean!
    I have a NiB bcg in my 24" AR and it stained after the first range trip.

    I started just going back to the tried and true phosphate.
     
    Sgt Nambu and Stomper like this.
  7. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    4,902
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Find a mother, have her spit on it. That spit has been known to clean anything.
     
    mjbskwim, OutlawHoss, PDX1953 and 2 others like this.
  8. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,279
    Likes Received:
    6,918
    I've used spray-on carbon cleaner intended for commercial kitchens, Easy-Off oven cleaner, citrus based cleaners and kero-based solvents even soap and water, they all work, given time
     
    Sgt Nambu likes this.
  9. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    3,166
    Likes Received:
    3,102
    I had some of the gunk on my bolt after the first time I shot about 40 rounds through it. First AR too. There was what I though was a wear mark where the firing pin retaining pin had worn a groove in the bolt! Ha, it was just a piece of carbon! I even took the bolt down to Curt's (Where I bought it) and had them look at it.....What a goof I am! The guy took a metal pick to it and it popped right off. DERP!

    So why is it we can't take a stainless brush after this stuff? That bolt is in there SLAMMING back and for for 100s, 1000s of rounds? You telling me a stainless brush is going to damage it? That's got to be some pretty damned hard steel I'd think.
     
  10. Koda

    Koda Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    2,196
    Likes Received:
    3,010
    same here, I was actually surprised there was so much and it was so stubborn after its first time out, I probably only shot less than 100rds. (the photo was after wiping with Hopps9)

    so when the bolt is in use it should be properly lubed but when cleaning its not.... I think a SS brush will be fine but just wanted to be certain for that reason. Ive worked a bit with metal finishing and on a micro level everything scratches
     
    Mikej likes this.
  11. rick benjamin

    rick benjamin USA, Or, Damascus Secure the drama Silver Supporter 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    2,436
    Likes Received:
    2,774
    Clackamas County Sheriffs Office trains their officers to carry AR carbines.
    I Range Safety for them at DRRC. Pick-up a lot of hints and tips.

    From one of their instructors -
    Carbon buildup on the bolt is not an issue.
    Wipe it down, lube it, keep the bolt face clean and dry.
    Carbon gets blasted off the next time a round is fired.

    Not only get hints n tips, get sorely offended
    "Don't need bronze brushes, Otis BONE, CAT Tool"
    Expert says "Old dinasaurs will tell you to brush it till it's gone"
    Old Dinasaurs!?
     
    Sgt Nambu, Mikej and slimer13 like this.
  12. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    2,570
    Likes Received:
    4,310
    I have a 6" stainless wire wheel on a small buffer from hobo freight..you don't need to apply any pressure just lightly spin the part by hand and let the wire barely hit the carbon.. Off it comes!
     
    Sgt Nambu, 308, Mikej and 5 others like this.
  13. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

    Messages:
    3,166
    Likes Received:
    3,102
    I'm guessing you've got a BUNCH of handy little do-dads! Don'tcha? :)
     
    Sgt Nambu likes this.
  14. OutlawHoss

    OutlawHoss Klamath-Siskyou Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    645
    Likes Received:
    1,146
    Any new/used gun I get is deep cleaned then treated with MiliTech. I've never had any type of fouling that didn't come right off after it's treated. The stuff just works, hands down. For a deep clean, I use the stuff I mentioned above, but forgot to include Kano Kroil. Regardless if one uses Kano for deep cleaning, it's a must have for any workbench. And like Hoppes, it has a (pleasant) memorable smell.
     
    Sgt Nambu, 308 and jbett98 like this.
  15. BlackRyder

    BlackRyder Edmonds Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    405
    Likes Received:
    789
    Green scotch brite pads! A little dab of hoppes and a light scrub with one of those will get her looking good as new. I do a lot of fiberglass and wood refinishing and the green scotch brite pad is probably one of the most useful tools in my kit!
     
    Sgt Nambu and OutlawHoss like this.
  16. David Bowman

    David Bowman Beaverton OR Archer Defense Concepts

    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    462
    My old First Sergeant would show up from retirement and have me mopping the rain sometime today if he knew that we used to use Carburetor Cleaner to clean our rifles.

    But a spritz in the gas tube and on shiny parts would eradicate the carbon build up pretty quickly. Beware that it will remove the finish from blued parts. If you have a shiny bolt, it shouldn't be an issue.
     
    Sgt Nambu likes this.
  17. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    4,902
    Likes Received:
    5,853
    Run it until it fails to fire.

    Then disassemble and find out just how dirty it can get.

    Next step is to ensure it doesn't get that dirty next time. No need to be spotless.
     
    Sgt Nambu and OutlawHoss like this.
  18. eliduc

    eliduc Active Member

    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    211
    I have a can of degreaser used for degreasing auto paint, primer, metal before painting. It melts carbon deposits immediately. It smells like it has some acetone in it so I wouldn't allow it to sit on plastic.
     
  19. Onramp

    Onramp Renton, Wa Member

    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    28
    Brake cleaner. Practically wipes off.
     
    Sgt Nambu likes this.
  20. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    7,573
    Likes Received:
    10,645
    +1 on BrakeKleen! Also used carb cleaner to good effect! Lots of good ideas here!:)
     
    Onramp likes this.