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Question for the pros: Reloading 7.62x39 brass (Don't laugh!)

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by JackThompson, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. JackThompson

    JackThompson Valley of the Demons Well-Known Member

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    Before you say "They sell Tula in the quarter vending machines at my local grocery store!"

    I know, but it's always nice to know you can make your own should supplies dry up.

    So I have Winchester brass, and R-P brass. The Winchester uses large rifle primers, the RP uses small rifle primers.

    The load data I have found doesn't specify.

    Will there be any problems or concerns (or what is the effect?) of using the same load data regardless of primer?
     
  2. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    :huh::bluelaugh::funnypoint::funnypoint::nuts::wow::rofl1::rofl1::bash:


    :poke::pound::drink:



    Yeah just a little bored:thumbup:
     
  3. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    For that round I seriously doubt it will make much difference. Same suggestion as for all calibers, work UP your load for each. The small primer will light off the charge a little slower than the large but the end result will be pretty much the same.

    Ignore the detractors, when their vending machine runs out, you'll be loading all the brass they threw away. While they're pointing their fingers and shouting "Bang-Bang-Bang", you'll still be shooting away.
     
  4. jonn5335

    jonn5335 Longview Active Member

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    I'll 2nd that there should'nt be a problem and no noticeable difference in performance I was also thinking about reloading 7.62x39 but I can't find enough brass to justify it. Do you cast bullets? If not it's just another way to cut cost and save some cash you would have to gas check them but they would work great as long as you keep em under 2200 fps
     
  5. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    My only suggestion would be to choose one or the other brand of brass and stick with it for consistency's sake. I found handloading for the 7.62x39 to be very beneficial when I experimented with two SKS's a few years back. The "Everymans Gun" is more accurate than one might think for the investment, and such improves to a noticeable degree when they are fed a premium diet. I had two of them: one was a Russian gun of noticeably higher quality than its Chinese brother (and it shot better too). After accumulating all the "Barbie Doll" stuff for them (magazines of various capacity, maintenance tools, etc., including a pile of different ammo I'd tried), I put them up for sale at a gun show: $400 for the whole (literal) shebang. An 18 year-old kid showed up, got slightly more excited than seeing a cheerleader's skirt go a bit high, but didn't have $400. (I insisted whoever bought one, had to pay for the other one too.)

    Said he'd be right back. 20 minutes later, he arrived with a buddy and their $400 was in so many denominations they had to count it three times. As they departed, I admonished them, "Now don't go off and start a war or sumthin'!"
     
  6. JackThompson

    JackThompson Valley of the Demons Well-Known Member

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    Spitpatch you keep showing up in my threads delivering wisdom. Too bad you don't live in Vancouver. I bet I could learn volumes just hanging out at the bench with you on a weekend!

    I picked up about 2100 pieces of brass from a member here. After sorting it last night I have about 600 small primered brass and 1500 large. As John mentioned, it can be tough to find so I don't want to just toss the 600, so I'll see about using those for a different purpose like hunting rounds or something.

    I broke my 7.62x39 depriming pin last night so I need to source a replacement punch rod before I start to work with them again...
     
  7. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Definitely don't toss the small primered brass. It could make for some good "accuracy loads". Take a look at what's happening in the Palma crowd. Lapua now maks a small primered version of the .308 case as it's shown to be a more accurate performer. The small primer lights off the load in a more controlled manner and is considered a "soft primer" when compared to the large. Soft in this sense is used to describe the amount of "explosion" it contributes to the overall load. For decades "soft primers" have been sought after by match shooters. Even long after the Military stopped using corrosive primers the match shooters continued because they fit this description. Again, the term "soft" has nothing to do in this case with the metal structure of he primer, just it's ignition characteristics.
     
  8. Varmit

    Varmit Beaverton, OR Member

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    Are small rifle primers any more sensitive to "slam fires" in semi-auto weapons? I am finding that the poly tip bullets feed much better in my Mini-14. After one breaks off and jams my action, I will probably feel differently...... :):)
     
  9. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Not as much in legal civilian semi-auto weapons. In Full Auto it might be a bigger deal. If concerned, just use the inexpensive Wolf/Tula .223 primers which are designed to prevent slamfires. Half the price of the CCI 34/41 military primers with the same results.
     
    Varmit and (deleted member) like this.
  10. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    deadshot is on to something with the "small primer might be better for accuracy" theory. Particularly in a case of capacity such as the 7.62x39. The absolute darling of the benchrest circuit now (and since its introduction in 1975) is the 6mm PPC. Palmisano and Pindell developed the round from the .220 Russian, which shares quite a number of similarities with the 7.62x39, one of them being case capacity. The PPC operates (and some say relies) on a small rifle primer coupled with a reduced flash hole to produce the accuracy for which it is renowned.

    My first true wildcat gun I wanted to satisfy my penchant for the weird and having things few others have. I bought a brand new Interarms Mini-Mauser chambered for 7.62x39. I asked Dennis Olson of Plains, Montana to rebarrel it in PPC: but this would not be the legendary 6mm. My favorite bore size is .25, and so Dennis chambered the Lilja barrel for .25 PPC. No other alterations were needed on the gun. Huntington was happy to make dies. I call it my ".25 Pronghorn Pursuit Cartridge", with apologies to Palmisano and Pindell. The tiny action, a 23" barrel of slightly heavier weight than factory, carries like a wisp on my shoulder when chasing speed goats by my preferred method: shoeleather express. The cartridge manages to duplicate factory ballistics of a .250 Savage (85g Nosler Ballistic Tip at 3000 fps). The Norma brass (small primer, reduced flash hole), Lilja barrel, and the scientifically designed case shape I believe all contribute to some phenomenal groups off the bench (and better yet, numerous good pronghorn bucks on the ground).

    As for "wisdom", Jack, I cannot recall any of what I know that came to me without making some pretty stupid mistakes. Thanks for the compliment, but all I relate is how to avoid trouble I didn't.