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property line issue

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by cbzdel, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    so here is my problem, I am debating building a new garage in my back yard. So I decided to draw up some plans. I work as a drafter and engineering tech, so this is a daily thing to me. I needed to make a site plan, for those who dont know, a site plan is basically a sketched overhead view of your parcel and everything is to scale and detailed and labeled.

    My problem is this. I went to the City of Tacoma & the Pierce County website and downloaded all the info on my parcel. All the maps say my parcel is 50x116. This is wrong, its actually 40x116. But the taxed sq ftg is correct even though the maps show more land than I really own. So that is problem #1.

    I go to the city and say whats the deal, you maps say my property is this big but its not. They told me sorry so get a survey done. Thats problem #2

    Is it my responsibly to correct the city maps? If their maps are wrong how in the world would they ever be able to do an inspection on my property? Why is it my job to correct their mistake, and it needs to come out of my pocket? So now if I ever want to build this garage, the price for the permit just tripled because I need to pay for a survey.

    Whats the deal here? Anyone have any input?? I just bought this house a little over a year ago and I cant believe I missed something like this before buying it, since it what I do haha..
     
  2. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    When you closed on your house, was there a title insurance company involved?

    If so, revisit them and ask that it be explained, as they should have done before you signed to close the deal.
    All easements, and variations like net sq footage vs. gross sq footage should have been mentioned and explained to you.
     
  3. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    yes I have title insurance, when I bought the house they gave me the map which shows 50'x116'. And it says 4640 sq feet of land.. I never though of putting the two numbers together, I just assumed it was correct.

    the sq ftg of land I am being taxed on is the correct 40x116, but I just dont understand why the maps all say 50x116.

    I contacted the realtor we worked with and said have you seen anything like this before, and he said "I have to agree with the city, you need to get a survey so you understand your property lines"

    So should I contact title insurance and ask them what the deal is?
     
  4. deen_ad

    deen_ad Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    I'm assuming that you used the actual plat of the land using the legal description starting from a section line? Is there a "more or less" in the description? To be accurate you will need to get a PE or licensed land surveyor involved if there's a difference.

    I too spent many hours plotting out property lines in my 30 yrs with the WA DOT.
     
  5. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    Yes I am using the actual plat map, I own (2) lots according to the description of my parcel number, lots 2 and 3, I will attach a picture in a moment of the map.

    My parcel number ends in 0340, and again I own lots 2 & 3

    untitled.JPG
     
  6. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    Is there an easement for a driveway, powerline, underground supply line etc down either side?
     
  7. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    when I first started my project I called the city and asked for the setback requirements and any easements on the property, there are no easements. The setbacks take off 5' from each end, but that shoudl not reduce my lot size from 50' to 40', because the setback is still your land.
     
  8. NCW Ray

    NCW Ray Sunny Eastern Washington Active Member

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    Any chance of digging around your property corners and finding your survey markers? If you can't find the markers take a trip to the title co that did the title report and see if they can explain it to you, if they can't help you, have it surveyed.
     
    mjbskwim and (deleted member) like this.
  9. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    Looks to me like the dark line at the top of the map is either a property line or easement.With the line just below it,I would guess the dark one is the property line and the second,smaller line (under the 115.74) ,is the edge of the easement or some set back.
    A green belt,maybe?
     
  10. Scott

    Scott Battle Ground Well-Known Member

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    It sucks but you have to pay to have the survey done and it is expenisve. My friend just paid $6000 to have his done.
     
  11. noyolk

    noyolk pdx Member

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    Look for the legal description from your deed or deed of trust. It will have a point of beginning(usually iron pipe or rebar) and move a set distance and angle to the next monument. Most rental yards have a pipe or monument detector for about $35 a day. It is NOT a normal metal detector, it looks like a length of PVC pipe with the controls on one end. The small end gets waved around and it will accurately locate the monuments if they exist. It is also very helpful to have a 100ft tape on a reel from Harbor Freight to once you find the first, measure to approximate the second monument checking along the radius of the stated distance. I have found 1/2" rebar buried in asphalt and it located it so accurately that the patch was almost not needed. If this does not work for you, I would then call in the pros.
     
  12. Grunwald

    Grunwald Out of that nut job colony of Seattle, WA Well-Known Member

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    As titsonritz said treat it as 40x116 and be done with it.
    You'd have a real problem if the maps were shortchanging you, but they are not.
    If you create plans for a 40x116 lot then all that happens is that the incorrect map will show that the plans comply with code.
     
    nubus and (deleted member) like this.
  13. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    I would.
    That's what you paid for, why pay more to someone else? The gross sq. footage is obviously 5800sq', so what is the reason for the discrepancy between gross and the net of 4640sq'?
    A survey is never a bad idea, but the answer may be simple, and as I said before, you already paid for it, it just hasn't been delivered yet!
     
  14. bruzer

    bruzer Grants Pass, OR Well-Known Member

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    Is a survey really necessary? When I had my shop built I hand drew my site plan (I did use a ruler to make straight lines). It showed the proper setbacks and the size of the shop. When the inspectors came, as the shop was being built, all they cared about was the setbacks. They did not get the tape out and measure the size of my lot or anything else.
    I fully understand that your job would require you to be precise but doing a site plan for a garage should not have to be so difficult. Good luck.
    Mike
     
  15. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    Makes total since, I am just so used to precision :)

    I would still be interested to know what the deal is, I am not trying to get extra property or anything or fight about the price I paid on the house, I am just wondering why the actual is different than the intended. But there is no way I will shell out a ton of money to find it out.
     
  16. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

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    Heres an interesting question, have you actually measured the physical width of your lot(s) (assuming the neighbors or you have already put a fence in) to get an idea of what you're dealing with. According to the map posted, your lot is approximately 116x50. Im wondering where the 116x40 is actually written in your documents.
     
  17. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    40x116 is the actual, from fence to fence.

    Because there are 5' setbacks on the property, if I took a tape measure and ran it from my neighbors house to the south to the neighbors hose to the north, that equals 50'.
     
  18. PhysicsGuy

    PhysicsGuy Corvallis, OR Resident Science Nut

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    Well the 5' setbacks should go into their property lines anyhow. That's interesting, I wonder where the mistake was actually made.
     
  19. cbzdel

    cbzdel Tacoma, WA Member

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    I would LOVE a 28' wide garage :D

    Not sure I could talk the wife into it.

    Right now we have a 9x25 garage, we cant park a car in it, I just use it as my workshop.

    We were thinking more along the lines of a 20x20 garage, her car will fit if it and I will have more room that before even with the car parked in there. Then the old garage will be torn down but I will keep the slab as a parking area for my truck as it will never be parked inside a garage. I would need to built the garage 10' tall to be able to get my truck into it haha..

    Engineering calcs are no problem, I work for (2) PEs and (1) SE :)
     
  20. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    One way to deal with this is to build to the 40' setback requirements and later on build an open sided shed roof for storage on one side or the other that can be removed if it becomes an issue later on.
    My grandpa said that everyone in Oregon should have ten acres and nine of it under cover.