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Mounting, leveling issues

shibbershabber

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I have a Primary Arms LPVO in an Aero mount...

I can NOT get it to stay level in the mount (horozontal axis)

I get everything lined up but every time I tighten the screws down, it rotates the scope.

Ive tried starting to tighten it out of level, hoping it would be level once tightened...

This seemed promising, but ridiculous for a mount this expensive...
Are all mounts with screws on the side this way?

I did the same process on another rifle with same scope but in a Burris mount in which the screws are on top... And it was fine.....

This damn thing keeps moving the scope when I even so much as finger tighten



Am I missing something here ???

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I had a similar issue awhile back, when I was trying to mount a bubble level onto my scope. Never did get the thing to tighten down exactly right, and ended up using a Send It level.

So I can’t help you with that tightening issue. The good news is, it shouldn’t matter if the scope is a bit canted on the rifle. As long as your level matches the reticle of your scope, and is level to the world when you shoot, you should be fine.

As far as the physics of the thing is concerned, it shouldn’t matter to the projectile if the gun is upside down, sideways, or whatever. The bullet is traveling through a round barrel, and it doesn’t know/care if the rifle is canted. (No matter how canted the rifle, if the scope is level the projectile should behave as expected.)






The Send It level can be mounted to the rifle or to the scope, and then calibrated to the scope. It was surprisingly easy. Expensive, but I think it’s worth the dough. And there are no more issues with tightening screws that pull things out of alignment.




**********





Sorry I couldn’t help you with that tightening issue.
 
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OP
S

shibbershabber

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I guess Im not up on all the details on this leveling your rifle thing...

I was trying to get the thing in the mount as level as possible so I could sight it in.

in my mind, if I am not level, when I make elevation adjustments to get it zeroed, its not going to adjust poi up or down, but rather along a diagonal axis.

If my x & y axes are not 12 & 6 and 3 & 9 how can I figure on any accuracy?
 
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I guess Im not up on all the details on this leveling your rifle thing...

I was trying to get the thing in the mount as level as possible so I could sight it in.

in my mind, if I am not level, when I make elevation adjustments to get it zeroed, its not going to adjust poi up or down, but rather along a diagonal axis.

If my x & y axes are not 12 & 6 and 3 & 9 how can I figure on any accuracy?
Good point. You are very correct when you are talking shooting long range. Or anything past 400 yards for that matter. It does make a difference. My only advice is to keep trying. You'll get it, even if it takes 10 trys. However, that is only but one reason I don't like the light weight Aero mount. I much prefer the Burris P.E.P.R mount for its heft and ease in mounting the scope.... Those aero's are prone to breaking too, so be careful with it...
 

erslll

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I haven't used the Aero mount. My suggestion would be use playing cards or something similar under the scope to hold it level while you tighten. I am not sure if the Aero mount has a flat enough spot under the scope to accomplish this.
 

DirectDrive

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I was just monkeying with a Vortex AR scope mount.
They are a $75 part and weren't line honed as cheaper rings go.
So I lapped them with the Wheeler lapping kit.
The amount of "error" in these rings was amazing.
Very easy to track as the anodizing got scrubbed off.

The Aero rings being a low cost mount along with the bottom fasteners probably exacerbates the issue.
The "not-so-perfect" fit is grabbing and rolling the scope as you apply torque.
(as mentioned above)

Here's Larry showing the process...
 
If you plan on shooting past 200, get a different mount.
It's a bad design. The cantilever at the top acts as a fulcrum and applies a different force on the scope than if it were two screws at the top and two at the bottom.
It's not that you're rotating the scope, you're flexing the entire assembly.
In short, you're going to fork with it a lot, and consider yourself lucky if you ever get 'er done.
There are many machinists and mechanics here, some of whom may have the skill to do it right the first time. I think that would be a small pool of the members.
 
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I've owned and mounted 4 of these. First time was a frustrating PITA...then I learned to adjust and allow for the movement.
For me the ultra light weight and clean one piece design off sets the one time mounting pain. JMHO
How much torque you putting on the ring screws.
 
OP
S

shibbershabber

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I've owned and mounted 4 of these. First time was a frustrating PITA...then I learned to adjust and allow for the movement.
For me the ultra light weight and clean one piece design off sets the one time mounting pain. JMHO
How much torque you putting on the ring screws.
I havent taken a torque wrench to it... But so far Id say maybe 1/4 - 1/2 turn past hand tight.

Though the movement begins as soon as they are hand tightened by holding a socket in index and thumb
 
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I guess Im not up on all the details on this leveling your rifle thing...

I was trying to get the thing in the mount as level as possible so I could sight it in.

in my mind, if I am not level, when I make elevation adjustments to get it zeroed, its not going to adjust poi up or down, but rather along a diagonal axis.

If my x & y axes are not 12 & 6 and 3 & 9 how can I figure on any accuracy?
You’re exactly right. If the scope is canted, you’ll be adjusting for elevation on that diagonal axis.

The scope has to be level to the world when you fire - but the rifle doesn’t. What matters is the scope’s reticle.



Here’s the solution:

Go ahead and tighten your scope mount, and don’t worry about it pulling the scope out of level. It shouldn’t go too far, and you probably won’t notice it when you’re done.

Once it’s tightened to your torque specs, set your rifle on a table so it’s held in an upright position. If you don’t have a bipod on the rifle, you can use a stack of books on each side to hold the gun upright.

Hang a plumb line somewhere, so you’ll be able to see it through the scope.
Gradually tilt the rifle, while you’re looking through the scope. When the vertical line of your reticle matches up with the plumb line, the scope is level to the world. Lock the rifle into that position. (By adjusting your bipod, or your stack of books.)

Adjust your bubble level, so it shows “level”. Now, it matches your scope reticle.

And that’s it. Your bubble level will show you when your scope reticle is level to the world.



I went with the Send It level because i was having a hard time trying to align my bubble level to the scope. Like your scope mount, that bubble level only had screws on one side. I never did get the thing to be in its proper place after it was tightened, so I returned it to the seller.

**********

I hung a plumb line from a lamp-hook in the ceiling.

2EB2F927-B6A8-4D64-9E34-263562EDC38C.jpeg




Lining up the reticle with the plumb line:

5CF0A54E-E49E-402B-ABF1-D482073DF013.jpeg




Reticle is level to the world.

AF84B32E-B383-464C-88CD-FF2526ECFE95.jpeg
 
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Dyjital

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A while back I purchased a Wheeler bubble level kit (one that clamps to barrel and has a moveable level).

It takes me a good 15 minutes at times to get the optic perfectly level and inline. it can be done. Typically I'll adjust to touching then bump a little to offset the twist that's going to happen once the mount is tightened.
 
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EPS

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And when you go to shoot it take a target and or a piece of cardboard and draw a straight line down the middle of it and when you hang it up make sure it is level or plum straight up and down.pot a dot or something to sight in on .
Once you hit the spot then adjust your scope up and down the shots should hit the line all the way up and all the way down if they start going left or right off the line .
Your scope is not level.
 

deckert

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Why not this style? I have similar type/different brand and they work perfect. Adjust the locking tension via the allen head inside the lever lock. This one is Leapers from Optics Planet and the price is around $20. I put them on an AR10 & AR15 with ZERO problems or issues after shooting. They make them with a hex head bolt as well. Bottom one is $12

Dan
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