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When there millennials start breeding I can just imagine how smart their kids are going to be.

RELEASED BY: Dep Jim Whitcomb, Assistant DCSO Search and Rescue Coordinator

LOCATION: Dutchman Flat

OCCURRED: January 23, 2018 at 1645 hours

LOST SUBJECTS:

Melissa Schneider 31 yof Bend, Oregon

Doniree Walker 34 yof Portland, Oregon

Jillian Seaman 32 yof Portland, Oregon

NARRATIVE:

On 01/23/2018 at about 1645 hours, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue was dispatched to a report of a subject that snowshoed to Todd Lake from the Dutchman Snow Park parking lot, then became lost on the way back and was being slowed down by a broken snowshoe.

Dispatch was able to provide the GPS coordinates of the snowshoer following the 911 call that was made which placed the snowshoer on the Big Meadow trail, north of Dutchman Loop trail.

Phone contact was made by a DCSOSAR Deputy to the snowshoer identified as Melissa Schneider to inform her of her location and distance from Dutchman Snow Park; about 1.25 miles. It was then learned Schneider knew she was on a ski/snowshoe trail and was with two other snowshoers; Doniree Walker and Jillian Seaman.

Schneider advised they were too tired to continue and they were getting cold. After learning the time delay of approximately an hour in getting DCSOSAR volunteers to their area by snowmobile, it was decided Schneider and party would continue on the trail they were on to help stay warm with the intention of snowshoeing to Dutchman Flat with plans to call back if needed. Schneider was instructed to call back in 30 minutes to provide an update. Schneider was instructed to place her cell phone in airplane mode in the meantime to save the battery which was at 26%.

At about 1720 hours, Schneider called 911 back to advise they could no longer see the trail and they were standing in an open field. Phone contact was made again by a DCSOSAR Deputy. Schneider then stated they could not go any further as it was too dark to see and wanted assistance back to the Dutchman parking lot. Schneider's phone battery was now showing 11%.

Three DCSOSAR Volunteers responded to the location on snowmobiles and located the subjects at about 1900 hours. The snowshoers were very cold, but otherwise fine. Schneider and party were transported to the Dutchman parking lot; a distance of about 3/4 of a mile without incident.

It was learned the snowshoers started from Dutchman at noon and became lost at about 1600 hours. The snowshoers' map was a picture on a cell phone which later died. They had no illumination other than a cell phone, two of which had died, no water or backpack with extra supplies. DCSOSAR volunteers were able to see the dim light from the groups remaining cell phone that was being held up in the air. The remaining cell battery was at 1%.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office would like to remind those who recreate in the back country to ensure they have with them the Ten Essentials;

1. NAVIGATION: cell phone, GPS, Map extra batteries
2. SUN PROTECTION:
3. INSULATION: extra clothing, protection from the cold ground
4. ILLUMINATION: Headlamp or flashlight, with extra batteries.
5. FIRST-AID SUPPLIES:
6. FIRE: Waterproof matches, butane lighter or candle stubs, plus fire-starting materials (paste, etc.). Do NOT depend on making a fire in bad weather!
7. REPAIR KIT/TOOLS:
8. NUTRITION: High energy, no-cook foods, such as high-carb energy bars. Carry at least 200 calories for every hour you will expect to be out.
9. HYDRATION: Extra water; take at least 1 liter for short outings and at least 2.5 liters for longer excursions.
10. EMERGENCY SHELTER: A Space blanket or bright plastic tarp (9' x 12') and a few large plastic trash bags. Bring something to insulate you from the ground. You cannot dig a snow cave without a shovel, and you should not sit/sleep on snow with¬out an insulating pad
 
When there millennials start breeding I can just imagine how smart their kids are going to be.

RELEASED BY: Dep Jim Whitcomb, Assistant DCSO Search and Rescue Coordinator

LOCATION: Dutchman Flat

OCCURRED: January 23, 2018 at 1645 hours

LOST SUBJECTS:

Melissa Schneider 31 yof Bend, Oregon

Doniree Walker 34 yof Portland, Oregon

Jillian Seaman 32 yof Portland, Oregon

NARRATIVE:

On 01/23/2018 at about 1645 hours, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue was dispatched to a report of a subject that snowshoed to Todd Lake from the Dutchman Snow Park parking lot, then became lost on the way back and was being slowed down by a broken snowshoe.

Dispatch was able to provide the GPS coordinates of the snowshoer following the 911 call that was made which placed the snowshoer on the Big Meadow trail, north of Dutchman Loop trail.

Phone contact was made by a DCSOSAR Deputy to the snowshoer identified as Melissa Schneider to inform her of her location and distance from Dutchman Snow Park; about 1.25 miles. It was then learned Schneider knew she was on a ski/snowshoe trail and was with two other snowshoers; Doniree Walker and Jillian Seaman.

Schneider advised they were too tired to continue and they were getting cold. After learning the time delay of approximately an hour in getting DCSOSAR volunteers to their area by snowmobile, it was decided Schneider and party would continue on the trail they were on to help stay warm with the intention of snowshoeing to Dutchman Flat with plans to call back if needed. Schneider was instructed to call back in 30 minutes to provide an update. Schneider was instructed to place her cell phone in airplane mode in the meantime to save the battery which was at 26%.

At about 1720 hours, Schneider called 911 back to advise they could no longer see the trail and they were standing in an open field. Phone contact was made again by a DCSOSAR Deputy. Schneider then stated they could not go any further as it was too dark to see and wanted assistance back to the Dutchman parking lot. Schneider's phone battery was now showing 11%.

Three DCSOSAR Volunteers responded to the location on snowmobiles and located the subjects at about 1900 hours. The snowshoers were very cold, but otherwise fine. Schneider and party were transported to the Dutchman parking lot; a distance of about 3/4 of a mile without incident.

It was learned the snowshoers started from Dutchman at noon and became lost at about 1600 hours. The snowshoers' map was a picture on a cell phone which later died. They had no illumination other than a cell phone, two of which had died, no water or backpack with extra supplies. DCSOSAR volunteers were able to see the dim light from the groups remaining cell phone that was being held up in the air. The remaining cell battery was at 1%.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office would like to remind those who recreate in the back country to ensure they have with them the Ten Essentials;

1. NAVIGATION: cell phone, GPS, Map extra batteries
2. SUN PROTECTION:
3. INSULATION: extra clothing, protection from the cold ground
4. ILLUMINATION: Headlamp or flashlight, with extra batteries.
5. FIRST-AID SUPPLIES:
6. FIRE: Waterproof matches, butane lighter or candle stubs, plus fire-starting materials (paste, etc.). Do NOT depend on making a fire in bad weather!
7. REPAIR KIT/TOOLS:
8. NUTRITION: High energy, no-cook foods, such as high-carb energy bars. Carry at least 200 calories for every hour you will expect to be out.
9. HYDRATION: Extra water; take at least 1 liter for short outings and at least 2.5 liters for longer excursions.
10. EMERGENCY SHELTER: A Space blanket or bright plastic tarp (9' x 12') and a few large plastic trash bags. Bring something to insulate you from the ground. You cannot dig a snow cave without a shovel, and you should not sit/sleep on snow with¬out an insulating pad


Basically that entire article could be summarized to say:

The human species continues to prevent natural selection from taking its course.
 
As a person on the tail end of the millennial generation, I am not surprised at all by the article above. Leave it to us to run out of battery when we really need to get off one more #lostinthewoods post before the battery dies. I like to be prepared, thus I always bring a phone and an extra battery so that in the event that I need to: build a fire, make a shelter, deal with a first aid situation, evade dangerous wildlife, signal for evacuation, or preform any other emergency task, I can call 911 because they are most likely best equipped and trained to deal with the situation at hand.

No, all jokes aside this is sad. Even with a cell phone, most of us who get out deep into the woods or wilderness in Oregon realize that any cell reception is a blessing. Even if we are able to make contact with the authorities in the event of a crisis, there is a good chance they will be hours out, and possibly find your location hard to pinpoint making a quick evac simply not plausible. I have been stuck with a broken down vehicle in the forest 6+ miles from the nearest road at night in the middle of winter. Without the proper equipment, I would not have been able to signal for assistance or been able to support myself overnight if I had to. There was no cell reception where I was and the google maps of the area were unreliable. With the correct equipment and training the situation stated was no big deal. I think people need to realize that the most mundane and simple outdoor excursions can become less than ideal situations because of un-planned obstacles such as "a broken snowshoe". As a firearm community I think we need to help people realize that as much as you love the outdoors and nature, nature is also a very dangerous place. If you are not prepared for basic survival and or first-aid situations, between dramatic temperature changes, aggressive wildlife, and challenging terrain, the outdoors can be a deadly place to be when you are not prepared.

All hope in not lost, there is hope for our generation. I hope that as a community we can educate others not only on firearm safety and usage but also on outdoor safety and always being prepared.
 
Definitely need to be prepared and have a plan to get yourself out, I know first hand that when you need help, especially out in the wilderness, that cell phones and outside authorities probably won't work and may not be able to find you even on an established road.

I was camping with my family late summer and we took the quads out for a quick ride before lunch on some gravel forest roads and I messed up and ended up with my quad ten feet up in a tree, and me down a 30-35 foot bouldered ravine with what I thought at the time could have been a broken back (I thank God it wasn't, I landed on a beachball sized boulder right in the middle of my back.) If I wasn't with other people I don't know what I would have done, there was no cell reception where I was and even once they got a hold of an a ambulance it was getting dark by the time that they got to me because they couldn't find where I was even with GPS coordinates.
 
I heard a story about a millennial that was using a virtual reality headset while playing a camping/hiking game.
They found his frozen and starved body three feet from the thermostat and a ham sammy.
A tragically true story and one that I hope is never repeated.
 
when i step foot into the woods i'll be damned if i dont have atleast my cellphone,back up battery, a compass, a headlight/flashlight, water, a couple clif bars and 2 lighters.

i usually study the area on a map before i go there too.
 
Ive talked with some of these millenials.. Many are dolts of the purest form.

Zero prepardness whatsoever. Socialist as all get out. College indoctrinated yet dumb as a sack of bricks

They actually think getting lost or stuck somewhere only to be dependant on another saving them is, "fun" and an "adventure".. and all because it fits their "spontaneous" carefree lifestyle.
 
I've met a handful of millennials that are sharp, ambitious, and practical young people with a bright future. I consider some of these guys to be my friends, and I enjoy spending time with them. The bottom half of that millennial generation, however, is the dumbest most useless group of people of any generation that I have ever met. I'm talking about people in their mid-20's who cannot hang a curtain rod or complete a 1040EZ without their parents help. At least the "dumb" people from my generation had some practical life skills.
 

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