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I wore glasses since I was a kid and had Lasik when I was around 25. Been 16 years and I would do it a thousand times over. There are risks but being free from glasses has been amazing. Maybe one of the best things I have ever done for my own quality of life. Lasik isn't vanity surgery; it's personal freedom. I don't know how well it works for older folks, but if you're a candidate, the benefits are so much more than just being able to shoot iron sights. It will change the way you live your life.

The downsides for me? I have small starbursts at night around lights. If you're tired, your vision gets blurier (which seems to be a natural thing anyway). With glasses, my vision wasn't blurry even when super tired. I will, according the doctors, 100% need cheaters someday. I lost the ability to focus super close up when looking at something (sub 3" away). Also the tensile strength of the surface of your eye is reduced by something like 70% so not a great idea if you get poked in the eyes a lot or will be experiencing lots of pressure from things like diving. I'm also very slightly more light sensitive to bright lights.

That is every single minor thing I have noticed. I'd have a hard time making the list of positives as they start the second I wake up in the morning and last until I kiss my wife goodnight (no more smudged glasses!). I'm a Lasik fan for life, which is good, because there is no going back.

Good luck with your choice!
Lasik deals with nearsightedness or farsightedness. Don't confuse that with presbyopia.

I assume the OP is talking about presbyopia. The only thing lasik can do to help with that is make one eye for far sighted seeing and the other eye for close seeing. This has complications for many people even when doing the same thing with just contacts (called monovision).

Also as we age the presbyopia changes, so if lasik sets the eyes at one level it may need to be set again fairly soon as the eyes ability to focus changes.
 
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Lasik deals with nearsightedness or farsightedness. Don't confuse that with presbyopia.

I assume the OP is talking about presbyopia. The only thing lasik can do to help with that is make one eye for far sighted seeing and the other eye for close seeing. This has complications for many people even when doing the same thing with just contacts (called monovision).

Also as we age the presbyopia changes, so if lasik sets the eyes at one level it may need to be set again fairly soon as the eyes ability to focus changes.
Getting old is NOT for the weak! ;)
 
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Lasik deals with nearsightedness or farsightedness. Don't confuse that with presbyopia.

I assume the OP is talking about presbyopia. The only thing lasik can do to help with that is make one eye for far sighted seeing and the other eye for close seeing. This has complications for many people even when doing the same thing with just contacts (called monovision).

Also as we age the presbyopia changes, so if lasik sets the eyes at one level it may need to be set again fairly soon as the eyes ability to focus changes.
Ohh
Thanks for the info.
 
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So reading through the above posts I keep seeing that people are getting advice from an optomotrist. Go to an ophthomologist!! They are a step up in the ranks and one should have any and all of the current information available in order to make an informed decision FOR YOU.

That said, Lasik changed my life. Instead of being trapped behind a pair of glasses I was able to do anything I wanted. If your doctor says you could be a candidate, go for it!! You'll wonder why you took so long.
In post #25, the "doctor" I was referring to were several ophthalmologists. A couple were FAA ophthalmologists when I was getting a vision waiver so I could get an FAA First Class Medical Certificate. I needed that to get an Airline Transport Pilot license.
 
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RE : Post #45
Hearing (yeah....it's NOT sticking to the original subject)


LOL......I heard this one just yesterday.

Spousal nagging fix with three easy statements. Best when said.....one after the other.

1. I'm sorry.
2. You're right.
3. I love you.
Aloha, Mark

PS.....as for the single guys.
1664052932146.png
 
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in my research, I learned that Lasik surgery will degrade your night vision
now this will just not work for me, I sit outside until my eyes adjust and walk forest trails with no artificial light
one of the pleasure's of living in the woods

anyone have experience with this after Lasik surgery
 
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in my research, I learned that Lasik surgery will degrade your night vision
now this will just not work for me, I sit outside until my eyes adjust and walk forest trails with no artificial light
one of the pleasure's of living in the woods

anyone have experience with this after Lasik surgery
I never had the slightest problem with lasik affecting my night vision, nor foggy vision or halos from bright lights…. guess I had a good eye doctor!
 
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in my research, I learned that Lasik surgery will degrade your night vision
now this will just not work for me, I sit outside until my eyes adjust and walk forest trails with no artificial light
one of the pleasure's of living in the woods

anyone have experience with this after Lasik surgery
I had lasik 10+ years ago. If I had to choose again, I would not. My eyes are dry a lot of the time (a common issue with lasik) and therefore get tired much more easily than before. By fixing my nearsightedness, I lost my near vision and had to start using reading glasses. And my night vision has suffered, with starbursts and general poorer overall vision in the dark. And it isn't due to the performance of the doctor -- he was the main guy at OHSU to whom other docs send their messed up cases to be fixed.
 
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in my research, I learned that Lasik surgery will degrade your night vision
now this will just not work for me, I sit outside until my eyes adjust and walk forest trails with no artificial light
one of the pleasure's of living in the woods

anyone have experience with this after Lasik surgery
As with every surgery, there is risk. Some people have had such poor results that they have killed themselves or been blinded, but I don't believe that has happened in the US (I'm sure someone can find at least one instance). One of the biggest issues people experience, even in the US, is night vision problems to the point they can't drive at night. Personally, I sometimes get small starbursts or halos, but they are much less than artifacts I would get wearing glasses at night. Additionally, I actually have increased light sensitivity and I would swear I have better night vision in low light conditions as a result. Brighter lights at night seem REALLY bright though. Might be a contributing factor that driving with lots of oncoming traffic at night in the rain is my least favorite driving condition, but it certainly doesn't prevent me from enjoying a walk outside at night.

Again, there are serious risks and some tradeoffs that can happen with Lasik. Dry eyes are common (and you have to use eye drops for quite a while), but your eyes should adapt and the dry eyes should go away. There are no guarantees however.

The craziest thing about my Lasik was that a few years after getting it, one of the surgeons tried to have the other killed. The company was Clearly Lasik and some of the details are here: https://www.seattletimes.com/seattl...ts-20-year-sentence-for-murder-for-hire-plot/
 
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Long time eye glasses wearer at age 72. I get annual exams because some years ago, I had a vitreous separation in my left eye. Which stabilzed without any effect on the retina. The eye drs. tell me I'm working on cataracts but I'm not there yet. So if I live long enough for the cataract procedure, I may get to enjoy the vision correction aspect of it. That is, if I'm a candidate for it.

My mother ignored cataracts until she drove her Buick into the back of a parked vehicle. Then she got the procedure done at around 85 years of age. She went for the deal where one eye is corrected for distance, the other for reading. Which I don't think I'd want. I already wear glasses for near sightedness; I'd like the correction for distance. I would be okay with reading glasses only. In fact, I have progressive lenses now, yet for most reading, I remove them and read up close. I have excellent up close vision in a range of three to six inches away from my eyes. I can look at tiny objects that most "normal" people cannot focus on. I could keep doing that.

Ears, I've got tinnitus strong. I've got a VA disability for hearing loss, they provide me with hearing aids. I just got my second new set, rechargeables, excellent and they seem to screen out most of the tinnitus. However, for married persons, there can be distinct advantages to hearing loss.
 
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Long time eye glasses wearer at age 72. I get annual exams because some years ago, I had a vitreous separation in my left eye. Which stabilzed without any effect on the retina. The eye drs. tell me I'm working on cataracts but I'm not there yet. So if I live long enough for the cataract procedure, I may get to enjoy the vision correction aspect of it. That is, if I'm a candidate for it.

My mother ignored cataracts until she drove her Buick into the back of a parked vehicle. Then she got the procedure done at around 85 years of age. She went for the deal where one eye is corrected for distance, the other for reading. Which I don't think I'd want. I already wear glasses for near sightedness; I'd like the correction for distance. I would be okay with reading glasses only. In fact, I have progressive lenses now, yet for most reading, I remove them and read up close. I have excellent up close vision in a range of three to six inches away from my eyes. I can look at tiny objects that most "normal" people cannot focus on. I could keep doing that.
My eyes were just the same. I would take my glasses off and work up close. After the cataract surgery, I had 20/25 distant vision, which was the same as with glasses before the surgery. My near vision was out of focus, and I was in the same condition as people our age that have normal distant vision - my arms are too short. I have to use readers, magnifiers, or my progressive lenses for close work.

You might ask your ophthalmologist if you can get the lenses for near vision and keep using glasses for distant vision.
 

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