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On technology & comforts, what would you bring?

I'd think the following would be helpful:

-Pencils. Notebooks.
-Cast iron cooking stuff, Dutch oven in particular. Perhaps only a dutch oven cast iron, with the rest of pots/pans whatever being sturdy standard wares. Balance between weight & longevity. One of our lightweight coated frying pans is around twenty years old with no issues, used frequently, however cared for well.
-homesteading tools.
-?grain/meat grinder.

-The quandary, modern electronics: e-readers with entertainment & information dumps (including how to videos), solar panels, electric tools (chainsaw, drill, sawzall) I wouldn't think a circular saw would be helpful? Drone-would be handy to map out the area plus look for suitable game/water, without expending as much manual scouting. Camera/security system?? Thermal imaging system (are such available to attach as NODs to a bump helmet??).

-enhanced ear pro.Bluetooth would give option to listen to instructions/entertainment AND enhance surrounding noises. Also hearing protection if you would have to shoot. A big one there, as that's a sense well worth protecting particularly in said unknown environment.

-Bluetooth speakers? It would be interesting to see how predators of the time would would react to forms of our modern "music". May give one extra reaction time???

...more modern tech thoughts to follow...
 
If one was considering taking along a .22lr, would you consider an air gun & pellets instead, or in addition to whatever else?...

In this case, I'd consider a break barrel .22 pellet gun. However I'd have to do some more looking around to see if the weight/size of said would be worthwhile over just a simple 10/22 takedown and a bunch of ammunition for it, as an example.
 

The Heretic

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If one was considering taking along a .22lr, would you consider an air gun & pellets instead, or in addition to whatever else?...

In this case, I'd consider a break barrel .22 pellet gun. However I'd have to do some more looking around to see if the weight/size of said would be worthwhile over just a simple 10/22 takedown and a bunch of ammunition for it, as an example.

I have a .22 takedown rifle that weighs one pound. Most pellet rifles weigh more than that. For hunting small game 2K rounds of match grade HP .22 rimfire ammo would last a person a long time - almost 6 years if you took one rabbit per day.

For the given scenario, I think I would want .22 mag instead of .22 LR. The weight of the .22 mag ammo is not that much more, lightweight rifles for .22 mag can be had, and the performance of the .22 mag is much better than .22 LR. Cost is much higher for the .22 mag, but in this scenario cost is not an issue, performance and weight are issues.
 
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The Heretic

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ammochart_02-jpg.jpg

5.7x28 ammo is 15.4# per thousand (40 gr VMax load - the heaviest of the factory loads) - double LR weight, 50%+ WMR weight.

On a per velocity/energy/weight basis, the .22 WMR is more efficient than 5.7x28, and there are a LOT more firearms to choose from that shoot .22 WMR and probably more accurate given that many of them are bolt action or single shot vs. 5.7x28 PDWs. Also, some of those .22 WMR rifles are very lightweight/compact: https://www.theultralighthiker.com/2018/08/02/packable-rifle/
 
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View attachment 870233

5.7x28 ammo is 15.4# per thousand (40 gr VMax load - the heaviest of the factory loads) - double LR weight, 50%+ WMR weight.

On a per velocity/energy/weight basis, the .22 WMR is more efficient than 5.7x28, and there are a LOT more firearms to choose from that shoot .22 WMR and probably more accurate given that many of them are bolt action or single shot vs. 5.7x28 PDWs. Also, some of those .22 WMR rifles are very lightweight/compact: https://www.theultralighthiker.com/2018/08/02/packable-rifle/

That's also a part of my "problem" in as so far as "what firearm(s)" to bring along in said scenario.

Reliable semi auto, vs single shot/bolt?

Are there reliable semiautomatic .22WMR (carbine/rifle)? I'm not familiar the cartridge, don't own any firearms in the caliber & hence haven't followed what is available.

I would "think" one would benefit more over the long-term (if one survives long-term, obviously) bringing along semiautomatics vs bolts / single shots. Even if its something as "mundane" as "fending off" "normal" sized type scavengers / predators on a rare occasion.

-Then there is the circle back towards the thought that ANY firearm would be an advantage. Including black powder. However given what is available today AND stepping into an unknown "world", what would be the better advantage (while also accounting for size / weight)...interesting!
 

The Heretic

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I would tend towards always having a semi (in a defensive caliber) or at least a revolver, possibly in addition to a large bore revolver (like my 460V), but any rimfire would probably be a single shot or bolt or maybe a lever action. Maybe for a rimfire, a custom made titanium or aluminum receiver bolt action with a carbon fiber barrel in .22 WMR.

You are not limited to just one firearm, but you are limited to what you can move under your own power.
 
This thread has had me doing some thinking of late & looking into what skills would be handy to have learned / to learn & put into practice / reasonable enough to learn "in the given situation".

Here is a nifty video from Townends on how to build and use a rudimentary wood turning lathe:


Worth a look see, IMO.

Uses in said hypothetical situation could be many. Make improved mallets, make replacement tool handles, make pegs, etc as well as making things improved simply for the aesthetics.
 

OldBroad44

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I'm assuming landing in temperate woods with rivers and coast. Western Oregon basically. Not tropical or other hot climate or desert. (I'm heat sensitive, and couldn't survive anywhere hot.) Might be much colder than present. That would work for me.

First gun I would choose would be a Ruger 10/22 Takedown with silencer and various mags including multiple 30 round mags. With powerful flash light attached for spotlighting creatures. In a situation with plenty of game and no hunting laws, you can take deer by shooting them in the head with a .22. My dad helped feed his parents and siblings during the depression by taking deer by shooting them in the head with a .22. Poachers often use .22s by spotlighting deer at night. Deer freeze and get shot in the head. If you can take only what you can carry across time barrier on your back in one trip, .22 is about all you could take and shoot regularly. Lets say I shoot mostly only at medium or bigger animals. Animals that will feed me for at least half a week. Suppose it takes 8 to 10 rounds/week to get all the meat I need. That would be one brick/year. To last 10 years I would need 10 bricks. 20 for 20 years if I am optimistic about my longevity. I could carry that much across barrier. Cache most of it and carry one brick.

Second and third most important guns: Two more fully rigged 10/22 Takedowns. Cached. In case first is lost or damaged.

Handguns: A .44 mag revolver. SW 6.5" 629 Classic. and a spare cached. For stopping attack by big stuff. If it's too big to stop with a .44 mag, focus on staying out of its way. If noise doesn't matter, it is an alternate to hunting with the .22. At one plus round per week that would be roughly 3 20-round boxes per year. 30 for ten years. 60 fir 20 years. If attacked by a lot of smaller predators such as wolves or humans, remember the 10/22 with multiple 30 round mags. However, best to hunt with .22 and reserve revolver ammo for SD. Can't really shoot more than about once a week and have ammo for 2O years. I think primary hunting gun needs to be a .22.

Second long gun: Scoped lever action in .44 mag with a silencer. and a second cached. Maybe Taylor Alaskan Takedown? For use with subsonic .44sp loads. Sure, not the most powerful. But I want quiet. Rig with flashlight for spotlighting game at night. Alternative to .22 as main long gun. To routinely carry two rifles, I think both need to be takedowns so whichever isn't in use can be packed.

OP is allowing one dog and no other animals. Make mine a German Shepherd.

Ax, tomahawks, saws for wood, bone saw for game. many knives of various sizes and kinds. and extras of all, cached, as backups and gifts. Night vision goggles. Lots of fish hooks and line. Stuff for making trot lines. harpoon heads. lots of wire for making snares and fastening stakes into fish traps. Portable kayak. Hammock/fishnet I already described. Lots of insect repellant. pack frame and pack. Sleeping bag. Cook pots. Dishes. Forks and spoons. portable tent. Tarps. Lifetime supply of aspirin, acetaminophen, Vitamin C powder plus extra for gifts. Small hand mill for grinding corn.

NEEDLES of all sizes and weights plus plenty enough for gifts for an entire tribes women. Awls. Mirrors for routine grooming plus gifts. Scapels and lots of blades. Scissors. Heavy waxed thread for use with awl to make moccasins, boots, and sow seams of skins used to make teepee or clothing or to cover wood frame to make light weight boats

Pulley.
Rope.
Nails and screws
Tool kit such as I have both in house and car. All sizes of screw drivers, pliers, etc.
Gun tools and cleaning stuff.


Corn, bean, squash, vegetable seeds, garlic cloves, poppy seeds for making opium as a medicine . Seedling fruit trees. grape vines. heavy Peasant hoe, fine hoe. Shovel. rakes. Extras for backup.

Whatever clothes are needed to be comfortable.

Tree climbing gear so I could build tree houses way up high. If alone, sleeping on ground is probably too dangerous. Solidly built tree house could be designed to exclude cats and bears. Would make a lift to carry goods and dog up and down.
 
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arakboss

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And what would you do with a mastodon once it was down?

Bear in mind there are plenty of other game animals, and that an elephant has been taken down with a 7mm Mauser. I would prefer something more versatile than an elephant gun. Something that could be loaded up or down with a wide range of bullet weights and styles - probably a .300 magnum of some sort?
You keep shooting the animals that come to feed on the mastodon:)
 

OldBroad44

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Better pick a place where water does not restrict your movement. Could be a real pain in the butt to have to cross something like the Willamette river or the Columbia or the Snake or even the Pudding. Unless you have a canoe etc.
Actually, the rivers were the highways. It was much easier to travel on rivers than on land in N America at the time if European settlement and undoubted long before whenever and wherever waterways aren't covered with ice.
 

tac

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I'm assuming landing in temperate woods with rivers and coast. Western Oregon basically. Not tropical or other hot climate or desert. (I'm heat sensitive, and couldn't survive anywhere hot.) Might be much colder than present. That would work for me.

First gun I would choose would be a Ruger 10/22 Takedown with silencer and various mags including multiple 30 round mags. With powerful flash light attached for spotlighting creatures. In a situation with plenty of game and no hunting laws, you can take deer by shooting them in the head with a .22. My dad helped feed his parents and siblings during the depression by taking deer by shooting them in the head with a .22. Poachers often use .22s by spotlighting deer at night. Deer freeze and get shot in the head. If you can take only what you can carry across time barrier on your back in one trip, .22 is about all you could take and shoot regularly. Lets say I shoot mostly only at medium or bigger animals. Animals that will feed me for at least half a week. Suppose it takes 8 to 10 rounds/week to get all the meat I need. That would be one brick/year. To last 10 years I would need 10 bricks. 20 for 20 years if I am optimistic about my longevity. I could carry that much across barrier. Cache most of it and carry one brick.

Second and third most important guns: Two more fully rigged 10/22 Takedowns. Cached. In case first is lost or damaged.

Handguns: A .44 mag revolver. SW 6.5" 629 Classic. and a spare cached. For stopping attack by big stuff. If it's too big to stop with a .44 mag, focus on staying out of its way. If noise doesn't matter, it is an alternate to hunting with the .22. At one plus round per week that would be roughly 3 20-round boxes per year. 30 for ten years. 60 fir 20 years. If attacked by a lot of smaller predators such as wolves or humans, remember the 10/22 with multiple 30 round mags. However, best to hunt with .22 and reserve revolver ammo for SD. Can't really shoot more than about once a week and have ammo for 2O years. I think primary hunting gun needs to be a .22.

Second long gun: Scoped lever action in .44 mag with a silencer. and a second cached. Maybe Taylor Alaskan Takedown? For use with subsonic .44sp loads. Sure, not the most powerful. But I want quiet. Rig with flashlight for spotlighting game at night. Alternative to .22 as main long gun. To routinely carry two rifles, I think both need to be takedowns so whichever isn't in use can be packed.

OP is allowing one dog and no other animals. Make mine a German Shepherd.

Ax, tomahawks, saws for wood, bone saw for game. many knives of various sizes and kinds. and extras of all, cached, as backups and gifts. Night vision goggles. Lots of fish hooks and line. Stuff for making trot lines. harpoon heads. lots of wire for making snares and fastening stakes into fish traps. Portable kayak. Hammock/fishnet I already described. Lots of insect repellant. pack frame and pack. Sleeping bag. Cook pots. Dishes. Forks and spoons. portable tent. Tarps. Lifetime supply of aspirin, acetaminophen, Vitamin C powder plus extra for gifts. Small hand mill for grinding corn.

NEEDLES of all sizes and weights plus plenty enough for gifts for an entire tribes women. Awls. Mirrors for routine grooming plus gifts. Scapels and lots of blades. Scissors. Heavy waxed thread for use with awl to make moccasins, boots, and sow seams of skins used to make teepee or clothing or to cover wood frame to make light weight boats

Pulley.
Rope.

Corn, bean, squash, vegetable seeds, garlic cloves, poppy seeds for making opium as a medicine . Seedling fruit trees. grape vines. heavy Peasant hoe, fine hoe. Shovel. rakes. Extras for backup.

Whatever clothes are needed to be comfortable.

Tree climbing gear so I could build tree houses way up high. If alone, sleeping on ground is probably too dangerous. Solidly built tree house could be designed to exclude cats and bears. Would make a lift to carry goods and dog up and down.

Uh, I thought the premise was ONE gun? Not the contents of Cabela's on Sales Day. ;)
 
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