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He had a rough life. Six broken ribs, dents to his head, bad shoulder, and a Cascade point permanently lodged in his hip. It gives some insight into how tough the times were.

-E-
Good point... My guess is, given the opportunity, Kennewick Man would have exchanged his spear for one of the mentioned firearms in short-order.
The ammo supply issue would obviously appear very different to a time traveling 18 year old vs a 50 year, who both would prefer having a lifetime stockpile.
 

OldBroad44

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I'm figuring livestock would be less useful in areas with lots of game or fish and predators. With the exception of horses and dogs, which could be used to facilitate hunting, fishingand protection against predators instead of replace hunting and fishing.

Maybe make my gear include a stallion and three mares, all trained to both ride and pack. And a trio of dogs. Kangals maybe? Enough speed and mobility and watchdogery to avoid being captured and enslaved. Expand amount of stuff I could take. Including a portable folding or blowup kiyak.

Then at time of my own choosing ingratiate myself with locals with gifts of young horses and pups? Maybe integrate with local tribe as their horse/dog expert.

Horses could be key. Anyone riding a horse and accompanied by pack animals would be obviously valuable. Someone with a firearm they can't make more of isn't once you take their gun. Someone who can build better bows would be obviously valuable. If you were somewhere that had iron ore, learning iron smelting and blacksmith skills might be the ticket. Iron/steel knives, axes, arrow points, etc are obviously valuable, if you can transfer skills to make more. If you can't make more, you're useless if they take your stuff.

Three pack animals would be enough to carry seedlings of fruit and nut trees. Corn, bean, squash, and vegetable seed. Gardening tools. Maybe task for first year would be finding places to plant fruit and nut trees, surrounding each with a wooden fence for protection against herbivores. Disperse them to spread the odds of at least one of each surviving. If climate is similar to NW now, I'd go for apples, pears, cherries, peaches, apricots , plums especially prune plums, hazelnuts, walnuts. Plant them all near rivers where there would be ground water.
 
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OldBroad44

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unfortunately, sounds like me. 30+ broken bones. No arrowhead in my hip though.

I'd stay away from the river to avoid malaria in my dugout.
No malaria in Americas until brought by European settlers. Malaria had spread from Africa to Mediterranean and Britain by the time of Columbus. Was already endemic in eastern north America by the time English settlers arrived there. Many African tribes had some resistance to malaria via one dose of the gene for sickle cell anemia. Two doses gives the disease, alas.
 
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OldBroad44

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All kinds of skills can be useful. Acrobatics, dancing, playing a musical instrument you can make, parKour.

One of my great grandfathers was a minister in Indian territory. The tribe was not at war with the white settlers, but was unfriendly. Visiting them at all was considered dangerous . My granddad did his homework. Learned that this tribe had a custom. Any man who visited would be considered an enemy. But the would-be visitor had a right to issue a physical challenge of any sort. If he won, he would be treated as an honored friend and guest. Granddad had excelled in running in college. He was a sprinter...

On his first visit to the Indian village, Granddad was immediately surrounded by all the warriors, all scowling. He got off his horse and issued a challenge to a foot race. All the younger braves immediately accepted excitedly. Granddad won by a wide margin. All the scowls turned to broad grins. The chief praised him for his swift running. And he was welcome in the village thereafter.
 

OldBroad44

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And grape vines.
Fruit trees including apples.
Hard apple cider and wine.
I bet anyone who brought fruit tree and grape growing and cider and wine making would be seriously popular.
 

OldBroad44

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I looked into it a bit. Nothing ever existed that large. Still creeps me out just thinking about it.

The fact the wife and I watched the movie “Love and Monsters” over the weekend might have heightened the cringe.
Unclear what "that" refers to. If 600 lb roaches, correct. No insect was ever that big. If dragonflies with 28" wingspans wrong. there are fossils.
 

Wombat of Doom

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No malaria in Americas until brought by European settlers. Malaria had spread from Africa to Mediterranean and Britain by the time of Columbus. Was already endemic in eastern north America by the time English settlers arrived there. Many African tribes had some resistance to malaria via one dose of the gene for sickle cell anemia. Two doses gives the disease, alas.
I am more familiar with that it was here at some point, and I thought some graves in the midwest ( before mass European migration)showed evidence of it coming here. I could be wrong, but even so, Mosquitos carry disease and I would want no part in it. Also, there is a very good chance you would have little to no immunity to diseases from 15000 years ago. The Bacteria and virii has changed far faster than other life forms.

My family was fairly early scotch irish that moved to NC/ Tennessee and lived adjacent to the local tribes. I know my grandfather still maintained a strong relationship with some leaders in the local Cherokee community. Oddly, if you look at how my family has operated, I do not think it would be off base to say that at least my parent's generation is still largely tribal.
 
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Wombat of Doom

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And in a tropical/sub-tropical region. Most of N. America is not tropical.
DC was considered a malarial swamp, in the 1700sand I could have sworn I read an academic article that placed malaria as a potential killer in the midwest before Columbus. You could also say that I do not wish any part of mosquito born diseases be they Malaria or other. I also realize that othér humans from other eras have diseases would likely be as fatal for me as smallpox. I suspect that would kill me in a few years anyway.
 

OldBroad44

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I am more familiar with that it was here at some point, and I thought some graves in the midwest ( before mass European migration)showed evidence of it coming here. I could be wrong, but even so, Mosquitos carry disease and I would want no part in it. Also, there is a very good chance you would have little to no immunity to diseases from 15000 years ago. The Bacteria and virii has changed far faster than other life forms.

My family was fairly early scotch irish that moved to NC/ Tennessee and lived adjacent to the local tribes. I know my grandfather still maintained a strong relationship with some leaders in the local Cherokee community. Oddly, if you look at how my family has operated, I do not think it would be off base to say that at least my parent's generation is still largely tribal.
You are right about the malaria being in n America before the European settlers reached n America. It came into the Caribbean and s America with European explorers. And spread to n America before European settlers came to n anerica. malaria and other diseases devastated n American Indian populations. When European settlers came to north America, they found relatively empty lands with wiped out populations, many empty villages, overgrown forests from not having been burned regularly, etc.

Part of the horrible story of development of the slave trade is the fact that in the American SE, most white settlers died of malaria within a few years of arrival. They pretty much could not do work that came with high exposure to mosquitoes. African slaves often died of
malaria too, more than half within the first few years of arrival. But some had genetic resistance to milaria. Slaves that survived their first few years were said to be "conditioned", meaning actually, resistant to malaria. White plantation owners survived by having houses on hills away from water that were breezy and mostly free of mosquitoes .
 
A person might want to take along a good guard dog, or find one. One that will obey, stay close and not go chasing after squirrels.

Ah, that certainly would be a game changer on multiple levels.

Added security, huge morale booster as well.

If one could bring say 2 mating pairs, would increase above and perhaps ad options to interacting well with indigenous humans. You could say gift pups to the tribe, not any "otherworldly" technology or anything, something they could perhaps simply see as benefiting to the tribe.

May lead towards integrating with said tribe.
 

Wombat of Doom

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You are right about the malaria being in n America before the European settlers reached n America. It came into the Caribbean and s America with European explorers. And spread to n America before European settlers came to n anerica. malaria and other diseases devastated n American Indian populations. When European settlers came to north America, they found relatively empty lands with wiped out populations, many empty villages, overgrown forests from not having been burned regularly, etc.

Part of the horrible story of development of the slave trade is the fact that in the American SE, most white settlers died of malaria within a few years of arrival. They pretty much could not do work that came with high exposure to mosquitoes. African slaves often died of
malaria too, more than half within the first few years of arrival. But some had genetic resistance to milaria. Slaves that survived their first few years were said to be "conditioned", meaning actually, resistant to malaria. White plantation owners survived by having houses on hills away from water that were breezy and mostly free of mosquitoes .
Well, there are some die offs that are too early even for that. I believe the Ohio mounds signify an early die off from disease. However, since the first new world contact with a native tribe was likely viking, I wonder if the disease crossovers may have started earlier than anticipated, but that is neither here nor there. 15k years ago is enough distance I doubt most of the diseases would be recognizable to our immune systems.
 

Wombat of Doom

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Different malarial strains than where they were from, so varied resistance.

Some areas of the world blood group systems other than ABO offered resistance, without the sickle traits.
well there are strains, but the physical realities of slavery would make you have a much lower survival rate anyway. I would imagine the fever and weakness would be called laziness by some overseers. Cerebral Malaria can kill you in under a day. That one scared the heck out of me in PNG. That and I had to get tested because I was exposed to malaria in an outbreak. I was negative.
 
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