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How many take the time to inspect the internals of a new gun?

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by PlayboyPenguin, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. PlayboyPenguin

    PlayboyPenguin Pacific Northwest Well-Known Member 2016 Volunteer

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    How many people here take the time and make the effort of disassembling new (or just newly acquired) guns and inspecting the internal mechanisms?

    I think this is something everyone should do but I do not think the majority of gun owners take the time to do. I know it helps make you familiar with your weapon but it also makes you more appreciative of what you are getting with higher end guns.

    I remember disassembling a new Taurus PT1911 once after thinking "How do they offer so much so cheap?" (it was cheaper when it came out than it is now). After opening it up and looking inside I found myself saying..."Oh, that is how they do it." :)
     
  2. PDXGS

    PDXGS Aloha... yes, Aloha, Oregon Member

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    Study it
    Strip it
    inspect it
    Assemble it
    Shoot it

    You shouldn't shoot what you don't know.
     
  3. sillyrabbit

    sillyrabbit Salem, Oregon Member

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    What he just said
     
  4. MountainBear

    MountainBear Sweet Home, OR Well-Known Member

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    I don't trust other people's ability to maintain their guns. I DCOA (Disassemble, Clean, Oil, Assemble) every gun I get, new or used. Most factories are more concerned with speed and not rusting during shipping than they are with proper oiling. It seems like they slobber it all over the gun. So I clean the factory oiling off and oil it properly before shooting. The only exception is that I generally leave the copper based lube in Glock slides. Used guns get the same treatment.
     
  5. captqc

    captqc Tigard Silver Supporter Silver Supporter

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    1. Strip
    2. Clean and inspect
    3. Lube
    4. Reassemble
    5. Fondle
    6. Shoot
    7. Repeat
    :D:thumbup:
     
  6. LogicBomb

    LogicBomb Grants Pass Active Member

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    the VERY 1st thing I do when bringing a new gun home is see how many parts it has and to totally clean, lube, inspect...you can ask SavageGerbil or Kerbyj...just how bad I am....if you can use the bore as a drinking straw its barely clean enough
     
  7. PlayboyPenguin

    PlayboyPenguin Pacific Northwest Well-Known Member 2016 Volunteer

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    I am the same way. I am sure the cotton swatch industry stocks went through the roof when I started buying guns. I leave a huge pile of soiled ones every time I clean a gun.
     
  8. theparanorm

    theparanorm Everywhere - Μολὼν λάβε Member

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    After getting stuck with crap guns in the past, I began to take a different approach prior to acquiring a new one. After aquisition, the gun is completly dismantled and fully "serviced". Then, and only then do I feel the gun is ready to go.
     
  9. Ballistic

    Ballistic Salem, Oregon Active Member

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    Same here. Every gun i buy gets taken apart, inspected, cleaned, oiled, and put back together.

    Then it's RANGE TIME, baby!!
     
  10. Visceral

    Visceral Portland, OR Member

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    Wait... you are supposed to shoot these things?

    I just buy them, bring them home and then constantly take them apart, play with the parts, and clean them.

    Shooting them just gets things dirty. ;)
     
  11. TAT2D

    TAT2D Portland Member

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    Well, I'm man enough to admit I'm a gun novice, and sought out and hired a gunsmith to look over a couple guns before I shot 'em. In the few minutes in his store got a quick lesson in how far to take down a Remington Fieldmaster for simple cleaning and more importantly learned that the Marlin shotgun I was proposing to 'return to service' (see my 'Help ID this Shotgun' thread) is reported to be 'weak' and should either be not fired anymore, or only with light loads -- something I wouldn't have lept to myself.

    I'm learning as much as I can, as fast as I can, but at this point do have some inkling of just how much I *don't* know about guns and seek out knowledgeable people to help fill in the gaps.

    Benton 13jan10
     
  12. TOVO

    TOVO SW WA. Active Member

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    I strip both new and used guns every time I purchase one. I just got a new C93 last night. Upon inspection I found the head space to be way out of spec. I just got an RMA# to send it back to the manufacture.:(

    I personally think it is very wise to check your guns. With the web there are countless ways to find experts on just about anything.
     
  13. terrylf72

    terrylf72 Portland, Oregon, United States Member

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    +3 .
     
  14. GED

    GED North Idaho Active Member

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    Ditto here too-especially used guns.
     
  15. elsullo

    elsullo Portland Oregon New Member

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    I always disassemble, clean, and lube a new gun or a used gun. New guns are often shipped with minimal internal lube to keep the packaging clean. I used to resent "Gun Tests" magazine because they would just take a new gun out of the box and shoot it, and then judge it.

    Mainly I want to know the weapon intimately before I fire it. I also over-lube the thing to make the action as smooth as possible. Just this week I bought a great used auto pistol that appeared hardly used, and after disassembly that proved to be true. Good thing, because it was totally dry inside---as far as I could tell, the rails had never known grease.....................elsullo :huh:
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
  16. T-Steve

    T-Steve Beaverton, OR New Member

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    Especially for used guns, it is a really good idea to strip and inspect them. It is interesting to see where the wear marks are on the bolts, hammers, sears, slides, etc. Plus used guns are frequently not very clean... Like some other guys said, some of the barrels I've seen must have used an acre of cotton to clean!

    But you should inspect even brand-new guns - I bought a new Marlin .17HMR bolt action a few years ago (great rifle). But its bolt was a bit rough. After cleaning and about 5 seconds with some carbide sandpaper it was smooth as silk. It's a good way to learn how they work, too.
     
  17. roguebowhunter

    roguebowhunter medford Member

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    when buying used i don't wait till i get home .. i ask the seller (if i don't know how to ) to show me how to field strip it.. look @ the parts (no saturday night gunsmithin) then i reassemble it ... i figure if they don't have the time to help me and let me see what i'm buyin they don't need my $$$$ Don