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Hard white Wheat at Costco

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Kellen, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. Kellen

    Kellen Boise, ID Member

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    So here in Boise, the local Costco is selling 45lb sealed buckets of hard white wheat for $16. Pretty exciting and a killer price. I'm going to make a habit of picking up a couple buckets each time I stop by.

    My Country Living Grain Mill will be on its way shortly!
     
  2. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Does that by chance have an expiration date on it? (the wheat, not the grain mill. :D )
     
  3. Kellen

    Kellen Boise, ID Member

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    I'll have to take a look. I'm sure it does, but may not be representative of the actual useful lifespan of the wheat. Once I get my grain mill, I'll pop open a bucket and let everyone know how it's packaged.
     
  4. twoclones

    twoclones Tri-Cities, WA Well-Known Member

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  5. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    twoclones-

    Wow! I never imagined!

    Thanks for the link!

    SF-
     
  6. The Cheese

    The Cheese somewhere special Member

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    hard wheat will last forever if stored properly. I thought I heard a story about a prof that made some bread out of some wheat that was found in a tomb in Egypt just to prove this point.
     
  7. ArmedAmish

    ArmedAmish Sherwood, OR Member

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    ... that whole wheat will last forever (not literally, but close). It's only when it's been milled that it starts to go rancid. Keep it dry, cool, and bug free and you'll have wheat for a long time.

    Make sure you have gas for the generator for the grain mill, though... If you run out of gas, feed the wheat whole to the chickens and eat the eggs and later, the chickens.

    Bryce
     
  8. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    There are some very good hand cranked grain mills available.

    If you're stuck, soak the whole kernels in water for 24 hours and eat them. If you have heat, boil them in water after soaking for 24 hours. They make a very substantial meal and are very reasonable to chew and eat. If you have some white or brown sugar or honey, they make a good hot cereal dish. A touch of salt in either case is best.
     
  9. Kellen

    Kellen Boise, ID Member

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    Gunner is right. I ordered the Country Living Grain Mill which is hand cranked or can be set up to be driven with a v belt attached to whatever you want.
     
  10. OFADAN

    OFADAN Brownsville, OR Well-Known Member

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    Assuming I buy several buckets and obtain a hand crank grain mill...what are a couple "can't fail" favorite bread/biscuit recipes assuming I don't have access to my kitchen oven?
     
  11. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Sourdough. Go to ebay and buy "Sourdough Jack's" cook book. Long out of print but still the best and still cheap to buy used. While there, buy some sourdough starter. It's a yeast. That used to travel with the trappers and the 49ers and the mountain men. It was at the gold rush. It went with the wagon
    trains... :thumbup: :thumbup:

    The yeast "eats" the flour and water mixture as it multiplies, softening it by digesting the gluten. The sourness of the end product depends on how long you let it "work." I don't like it sour at all so I just let it work overnight.

    Right now you can make the most tender, best flapjacks you've ever eaten with this method. You can make biscuits in a skillet.

    You always reserve a bit of your starter by taking a bit after it rises ("bubbles up") and mixing it with fresh flour to form a lump which you use to start your next batch. It's of course a living organism so you keep your starter in the refrigerator and "freshen" it periodically if you don't use it. If you use it a lot, it doesn't need to be refrigerated.

    If you're ever stuck without or ruin your starter by forgetting to reserve some before you cook, the white stuff on berries including wild berries is yeast. Get several varieties and try them until you find your favorite flavor and you're good to go again.

    :thumbup: :thumbup:
     
  12. BlvdKing

    BlvdKing Almost Boring Member

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    Does anybody have any experiance with the shelf reliance products?
     
  13. Silver Fox

    Silver Fox Puyallup, WA Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a link in which you are referencing?

    SF-
     
  14. willseeker

    willseeker N. Portland. Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the sourdough starter. Even if it goes dormant, just add equal amounts of flour and water and it should come back to life. No need for store bought yeast.

    Bread needs moisture to bake properly, the benefit to not having a conventional oven is the "dutch oven"! When you put the dough in and covered, the moisture from the dough itself bakes the bread. Haven't tried it yet :p, but should work.

    Recipes? Wow, I've made sourdough olive and cheese, sourdough currant and walnut, sourdough cranberry and hazelnut...

    Will
     
  15. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    Store bought yeast doesn't taste or work the same as sourdough yeasts, but don't ask me why. There are so many varieties of yeast. Old timers carefully kept their starter above almost everything else. There's a better chance of getting good sourdough starter in the wild than in the store. Still, it's so cheap to buy a known "San Fransisco starter" that it's well worth it.

    Sourdough Jack's book always came with a packet of starter stapled to the inside of a cover, but those are long gone or dead I suppose. My starter is still Sourdough Jacks because I've kept it going for years. I can't tell the difference between it and "San Fran" starter though. Maybe it's the same.

    If we think back to when people did their cooking over a fire (even in nice homes where they cooked over a fire in the fireplace using wrought iron gizmos to hold the pots) we can realize that we can do the same with little effort. We can make flapjacks or biscuits or bake bread over a campfire. If we have sugar and cinnamon, nuts, etc., we can make sweet breads.

    Threadjack: For SHTF prep, I consider a good set of antique cast iron cookware a must. At least a good skillet, and a pot with lid and hanging handle, and a cast iron teapot. The new stuff is cr*p - rough finish, warps, etc. Ya gotta get old ones like grandma had. Ya gotta season it by cooking grease into it and never wash it. Wipe it out, grease it, and let the heat sterilize it. :thumbup:
     
  16. BlvdKing

    BlvdKing Almost Boring Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 26, 2009