Quantcast
  1. Sign up now and join over 35,000 northwest gun owners. It's quick, easy, and 100% free!

fixing buggered gun screws

Discussion in 'Maintenance & Gunsmithing' started by TINCANBANDIT, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Federal Way Active Member

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    153
    I have found lots of guns with buggered up screws because someone used the wrong type of screw driver on them. you should always use a HOLLOW ground screw driver.

    screwdrivertiptypes_zps23460604.jpg

    The results of using the wrong screwdriver look like this:


    screws.jpg

    Fortunately, the repair is easy and anyone can do at home with minimal tools

    The first step is to "peen" the metal back into shape, you will need a brand new ball peen hammer (or an old one with a freshly ground and polished face). the face of the hammer must be smooth or your results will vary as the dents in the hammer face will affect the surface of the screw head.

    Once you have the hammer, find a piece of steel (1/4 or thicker) and drill a hole just slightly larger than the threads of the screw

    fixscrew1.jpg

    Wrap the threads of the screw with masking tape and seat it in the hole

    fixscrew2_zpsf43c0b43.jpg

    next gently "peen" the metal back down, remember to move the hammer around and don't strike it too hard. the object is to push the metal back down close to its original location.

    Next take a parallel needle file that is the correct width for the slot and file the slot so that you remove the extra metal.

    (sorry I forgot to take a picture of that part)

    The next step is polishing: get your self a piece of pine wood (any soft wood will suffice), some sand paper (220 & 600 grits), some WD-40 (or other lightweight cutting oil) and a drill. Wrap the screw threads with tape again and chuck it into the drill motor.

    fixscrew3.jpg

    Then lay the sand paper onto the pine board and coat with cutting oil, press firmly on to the paper and spin the screw. You can push hard here as the wood will yield to the pressure and create a depression for the screw head. You will need to move it around as the sand paper will get torn up. Start with the 220 grit and finish with the 600 grit (go even higher for a nicer finish)

    fixscrew4.jpg

    The next step is re-finishing the screws. I used cold blue which is fine for small parts as it is next to impossible to hot salts blue tiny parts.....



    fixscrew5.jpg
     
    taroman, Blitzkrieg, GOG and 9 others like this.
  2. rick49

    rick49 Lewis Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    900
    Likes Received:
    1,796
    Thanks for posting.
     
  3. erudne

    erudne The Pie Matrix PPL Say Sleeping W/Your Rifle Is A bad Thing? Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,279
    Likes Received:
    6,918
    Thanks
    gun screws use different threads then SAE which makes replacement a bit more difficult. I have used jeweler's files to widen the slots on buggered screws and ground a new screw driver to fit. I have also welded the slot shut and cut a new slot
     
    Blitzkrieg and (deleted member) like this.
  4. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,674
    Likes Received:
    4,849
    First thing I did when I got the cash was a small set of hollow grounds.. recently came into gun funds and bought a full set of Wheeler tools. The old adage is

     
  5. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    Likes Received:
    150
    Yeah but what do you do if you've boogered the screwhead still have it stuck into the gun? anything else besides drilling it out and sticking a larger screw in.
     
  6. KalamaMark

    KalamaMark Kalama Wa Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    544
    Likes Received:
    263
    Nice post complete with pictures!! Most excellent.

    Taylor, I recently went through the stripped/stuck screw problem on a GSG-1911 Takedown screw. The allen head stripped out, it was recessed in the frame, and I had no idea of the diameter of the threaded portion underneath the head...but I was ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN that if I tried to drill it out I would screw it up. Pun intended.

    I scraped a shiny space around the stripped allen head hole, and as much of the hole as I could. I sanded the short leg of the allen screw shiny, then propped it up with the shiny leg in the shiny hole. I then sharpened the tungsten on my Tig welder to a very fine point and turned the power way, way down, and struck a very small, fine arc, and heated the screw and the allen wrench until I could braze the two together with some fine silicon bronze brazing wire. The heating and cooling helped release the threads, and I was able to take the screw out. I took the brazed screw/wrench combo to Tacoma screw, and they found me a screw that had the same thread pitch and head size, and I shortened the threaded part to match the old one.

    One could do the same with a sacrificial phillips or flathead bit on their corresponding screws.
     
  7. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

    Messages:
    6,468
    Likes Received:
    7,687
    Last summer I was at an estate sale that had a lot of old guns and ammo for sale.
    I couldn't believe the high prices the estate sales people had marked on the vintage guns and ammo, but after digging around a little, I found a large metal tool box filled with all sorts of vintage gunsmithing tools loaded with taps, dies, peep sights, scope rings and lots of different sized screws.
    Paid $20.00 for the lot, and they sure come in handy when you need that one odd size screw.
    The old guy must have been a basement gunsmith and I think of him every time I dig through them.

    The old saying is true, "There are no U Hauls behind a hearse."
     
  8. Straight Shooter

    Straight Shooter North Bend OR Active Member

    Messages:
    206
    Likes Received:
    33
    I would add that taking burrs down on the screw would go better with a file before you bring on the drill and paper.
     
  9. TINCANBANDIT

    TINCANBANDIT Federal Way Active Member

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    153
    yes, hammer first, then file, then polish with the drill
     
  10. taylor

    taylor Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,134
    Likes Received:
    150
    KalamaMark, thanks for the advice, I lack the skills needed but know someone who can tackle it and maybe fill the holes in my Tokarev where the safety used to be at the same time.