Eager to learn Ammo reloading.

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Im new to the world of reloading my own ammo, i honestly dont know where to start. im looking to get a press, i know someone who does it and is willing to teach me, but, as far as buying a press.. should i start with an "entry level" press. or, buy a nice one from the start and just learn off that? Any feedback is appreciated. side note.. there is a shotgun for sale on my page that id trade for a press.
 
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RyanG90
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Honestly I would start with a Lee turret, you can use them as a single stage and still go slow with the benefit of not having to change out and re adjust your dies every time you move on to a new batch.

also biased as that is the very press I started on. :D
Thank you for the feedback! I will look into that model!
 
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Start off with a good reloading manual like hornaday or lee. I know the old lee manual had step by step directions.
You don’t need the newest hottest ticket items to reload. A single stage press and a good tutor is important. The rest comes in time when you start to learn what is needed to make more or higher quality ammo.
I started out with a dipper set and a trickier for powder. Now a digital auto dropper. But I learned the basics to start.
 
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RyanG90
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Start off with a good reloading manual like hornaday or lee. I know the old lee manual had step by step directions.
You don’t need the newest hottest ticket items to reload. A single stage press and a good tutor is important. The rest comes in time when you start to learn what is needed to make more or higher quality ammo.
I started out with a dipper set and a trickier for powder. Now a digital auto dropper. But I learned the basics to start.
Much appreciated! im looking for all the knowledge i can get. i bought a book on basic reloading for handgun ammunition. i intend on reading it through and starting small. thank you for the feedback!
 

gmerkt

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If you have a mentor who is willing to get you started, you've got a good leg up on the process. But still get and read "the book;" some mentors are better than others. My cousin got me started decades ago. He was fair as an instructor and as to technique. But now all these years later, technically I'm far ahead of his skills. A person can pick the point at which they choose to stop learning.
 
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RyanG90
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If you have a mentor who is willing to get you started, you've got a good leg up on the process. But still get and read "the book;" some mentors are better than others. My cousin got me started decades ago. He was fair as an instructor and as to technique. But now all these years later, technically I'm far ahead of his skills. A person can pick the point at which they choose to stop learning.
thank you!
 

GWS

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Yet another vote for Lee turret press. It’s slower than a progressive press, but components are in short supply these days so you probably wouldn’t be able to buy enough powder/primers to warrant using a progressive press anyway. So... learn the basics on that turret press.
What else do you need?
Good dies (Lee dies are good and relatively inexpensive)
A reliable powder measure (RCBS Uniflow)
An accurate scale (I like RCBS balance scales)
A good reloading manual (Lyman manual gets my vote primarily because it has load data for cast lead bullets as well as jacketed)
AND a bullet puller because in reloading the mantra is When in doubt, throw it out.
The bullet puller helps you tear down mistakes and salvage the components.
Good luck and have fun with your new hobby!
 
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The Lyman book is a good one too. Buying used equipment will save you a few bucks. I bought a bunch of used stuff from e bay and a few gun forums. I reccoment a used RCBS Rock Chucker press. They are solid as can be, guarrenteed for life and take the die plug out it can be converted to the Hormady Lock n Load bushings. I quartet of a turn the die is out, quarter of a turn and the other die is in. No srewing dies in & out, it is so much faster to swap out dies.

What calibers do you want to load and how many rounds a month do you plan to shoot?.

There are a couple of guys up this way that sell used reloading equipment if you want their info send me a
 
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RyanG90
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Yet another vote for Lee turret press. It’s slower than a progressive press, but components are in short supply these days so you probably wouldn’t be able to buy enough powder/primers to warrant using a progressive press anyway. So... learn the basics on that turret press.
What else do you need?
Good dies (Lee dies are good and relatively inexpensive)
A reliable powder measure (RCBR Uniflow)
An accurate scale (I like RCBS balance scales)
A good reloading manual (Lyman manual gets my vote primarily because it has load data for cast lead bullets as well as jacketed)
AND a bullet puller because in reloading the mantra is When in doubt, throw it out.
The bullet puller helps you tear down mistakes and salvage the components.
Good luck and have fun with your new hobby!
Thank you for lining all that out! I’ve been looking to see what I need to get started so that’s very helpful!
 
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RyanG90
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The Lyman book is a good one too. Buying used equipment will save you a few bucks. I bought a bunch of used stuff from e bay and a few gun forums. I reccoment a used RCBS Rock Chucker press. They are solid as can be, guarrenteed for life and take the die plug out it can be converted to the Hormady Lock n Load bushings. I quartet of a turn the die is out, quarter of a turn and the other die is in. No srewing dies in & out, it is so much faster to swap out dies.

What calibers do you want to load and how many rounds a month do you plan to shoot?.

There are a couple of guys up this way that sell used reloading equipment if you want their info send me a
I’m not opposed to used equipment! I usually shoot, .357 .38 .45 .9mm .556 .223 .300blkout. Roughly 100 rounds of each a month. I will follow your page for when it comes to to buy everything. Thanks for the input!
 

GWS

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I prefer the Lee turret over the Chucker because you can set up your dies in each turret and then, when you want to change calibers, you can, for example, pop the 9mm turret out, put in the turret with the .300 Blackout dies, swap the shell holder and you're in business. Also the primer tool is simple and efficient.
 

awshoot

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I’m not opposed to used equipment! I usually shoot, .357 .38 .45 .9mm .556 .223 .300blkout. Roughly 100 rounds of each a month. I will follow your page for when it comes to to buy everything. Thanks for the input!
Well in two months you'll be shooting that per week if you reload! (EDIT: if you can find primers -- large pistol is still out there but small pistol and small rifle are rare -- if you have any .45 brass that takes large primers, treasure it)

There are some recent threads on this topic you may like to peruse:

And don't miss the reloading mistakes thread -- easier to read about them then to do them:
 
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When I bought my first pistol (Sig 228) it came with 200 rounds and I thought I had a lifetime supply: then I went to the range and 45 minutes later it was all gone. I did the math and decided a Lee Loadall kit with everything in it but dies would pay for itself after about 800 rounds. It was a good press and very affordable on my meager budget. It worked great till I started shooting USPSA: not that the machine was bad, but it took me 2-3 hours to load up the 120 rounds I needed for the weekend shoots. Then I discovered progressives: a Dillon 550 progressive to be exact. I read through the manual and got it all set up in a couple hours. Next thing I know I am loading 350 rounds an hour--and that's with my two-year old "helping" me. :)

One day I made an adjustment and neglected to put it back together correctly which resulted in some plastic parts getting broken. I called Dillon to order the parts, the agent put together the order and asked if I needed anything else. I said "Nope, that should do it. Are you ready for my credit card number?" His reply was "Sir, we have a 'No BS Warranty'--there is no charge. Thank you for being a Dillon customer." To which I replied "But it was my error, and I don't have a problem paying for it; especially since it is only $12." He said, "I appreciate your honesty, but there is still no charge. Your parts will be on the morning shipment." I was so impressed I said "Well, while I've got you, maybe I should get a spare parts kit in case I break something else." He added the kit and was going to include it for free but I insisted on paying for it. He took my card number and gave me the cost, which was less than I expected. "Isn't there a shipping charge?" "Nope, that is taken care of with your warranty parts."

I've used that machine for 25 years and tens of thousands of rounds of ammo; it works great and you can't beat their customer service. Yes, they cost more, but "pay once, cry once." The Lee would be fine if you don't mind spending the time and don't shoot more than 200-300 rounds a month, but if the shooting bug bites you I'd go with a progressive.

Good luck and let us know what you end up with.
 

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