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Background check process

Discussion in 'Legal & Political Archive' started by NoSmoking, Mar 9, 2013.

  1. NoSmoking

    NoSmoking Springfield Member

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    Hi guys, still working on my letter to send out to various politicians.

    This is something I haven't had the pleasure of going through yet since I cannot find the gun I want in my price range = /
    So I turn to you guys.

    What is the step by step process in getting a background check when buying a firearm? Also is this process the same one used when applying for a job that requires a background check?

    Any feedback is appreciated
    Thanks
     
  2. pokerace

    pokerace Newberg Well-Known Member

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    1 select gun
    2 fill out 4473
    3 dealer call or goes on line for background check
    3 given ok pay for gun
    4 do finger prints
    5 walk out with gun.

    only wait is background check, can be awhile if OSP is busy.


    I think it is diff. from apply for job. I don't think OSP does job apps. background checks.
     
  3. mancat

    mancat Kitsap County Well-Known Member

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    you guys in OR have to do finger prints as part of a normal FFL purchase?
     
  4. coyote223

    coyote223 NW Oregon Stamp Collector,,,

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    Thumb print,,,
     
  5. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Only if the purchase takes place through an Oregon State FFL. I recently bought a shotgun from a private seller in Vancouver and the transaction was handled through a WA state FFL and no Thumbprints were required.
     
  6. tacticalgunner

    tacticalgunner Wilsonville The Man, The Myth, The Legend Bronze Supporter

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    I have bought guns in North Carolina, Oregon, Virginia, and all made me do thumb prints, thats been through a span of 16 years
     
  7. deen_ad

    deen_ad Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    Shouldn't the transfer have gone through an FFL in OR since that's where they buyers residence is or is it different for a long gun?
     
  8. Kable

    Kable Lynnwood Active Member

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    You can buy long guns in different states just not hand guns
     
  9. BSG 75

    BSG 75 Oregon Well-Known Member

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    To clarify, you have to buy the rifle or shotgun in person at the licensee's place of business

     
  10. NoSmoking

    NoSmoking Springfield Member

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    Thanks guys, I appreciate the feedback.
    It was not clear to me that the current background check process required registering the firearm.


    I don't like the idea of gun registration, and I'm firmly against it. I also realize background checks could be viewed as a loss of privacy, especially if you've done nothing wrong. What is your guys opinion, on a compromise?
    What if there was a new background check system in place that only checked for criminal history and nothing else? Basically the process would have nothing to do with firearms. The process would work sort of like a credit check.. full name, current address, SSN.. results come back near instantly with "clear" or "denied". Documents get destroyed after sale, or given to the customer.

    In my humble opinion I do think there should be some sort of "check system" in place just so criminals can't freely walk into a gun shop and buy whatever they want, no questions asked.

    What do you think?
     
  11. PiratePast40

    PiratePast40 Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    ..
     
  12. One-Eyed Ross

    One-Eyed Ross Winlock, WA Well-Known Member

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    "Compromise is but the sacrifice of one right or good in the hope of retaining another -- too often ending in the loss of both." Tyron Edwards
     
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  13. NoSmoking

    NoSmoking Springfield Member

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    So, your feeling is, 'anyone' should be free to walk into a gun store and buy anything there unimpeded, correct?

    Who would you include as 'anyone'?
     
  14. PiratePast40

    PiratePast40 Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    The federal and state laws exist now. What additional compromises are you asking about?
     
  15. NoSmoking

    NoSmoking Springfield Member

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    Most, if not all gun owners and potential owners (from what I gather) greatly dislike background checks, is that fair to say? What do you think would be an acceptable CBC system, if any?

    Post #10 was my opinion on the above question. So I think I jumped ahead a bit, my apologies.
    The compromise would have been post #10. As an example, if the current system was scrapped and a new system put in place.

    :eek:
     
  16. PiratePast40

    PiratePast40 Willamette Valley Well-Known Member

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    I don't think there are too many who would say that it's OK for felons to have a gun since they have forfeited some of their rights by their actions. That's certainly arguable, and right or wrong, I think that the majority agree.

    The problem with any system, is the basic fact that criminals will find a way to get around the law and commit violent acts, regardless of the law. We can discuss and argue plans, programs, and laws all we want but it changes nothing with regard to criminals. I can't say for certain, but my gut feeling is that crooks aren't a part of the discussion and couldn't care less what laws are put in place.

    I think what you're asking, is what the 2A supporters would accept. My feeling is that we've allready accepted background checks at a gun store and over the internet. And in Oregon, even accepted the requirement to do background checks at gun shows. One of the reasons that gains acceptance is that most people are sensitive to gun running, straw purchases, and sales to people prohibited from owning a gun. Those laws supposedly close the loophole where we normally see large quantities of guns at one place and the potential for large numbers of sales.

    But we also recognize that background checks on an individual basis is only enforceable with registration. Not only is it invasive, but we also know that the criminals simply won't do it. So what you have now is a cumbersome and invasive system directed at law abiding citizens. It has zero impact on the criminal. Since we know it has no impact on the criminal, it is now simply an insult to law abiding citizens since you've made the presumption of guilt and placed the burden of innocence on the accused. I'm told that is the type of Napoleonic law that they have in Mexico.

    It sounds like a way to dodge responsibility to say that we don't want new laws, or that we won't come up with a compromise to solve the problem of evil in the world. The truth is, that more laws won't make a bit of difference, and are being used in an emmotional argument pitting gun owners against some anti-gun politicians. The only thing that new laws will do is to make some people feel as if they have done something when in fact they're just feeding their own egos.
     
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  17. pchewn

    pchewn Beaverton Oregon USA Well-Known Member

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    Yes, "anyone" should be free to walk in and buy, unimpeded.

    "ANYONE" includes: All adults over the age of 18. The only check that would be acceptable would be to check the ID of those who look young, like they do for alcohol and cigarettes.

    The felons should be either:
    A) In prison, where there are no legal means to buy a gun.
    B) On parole, where there are conditions they have agreed to, such as not owning guns and not associating with gang members -- and there are random checks by the parole officers.
    C) Free after serving a sentence -- then the ex-felon should be able to buy a gun just like the rest of us.
    D) Dead.

    The dangerously mentally ill should be either:
    A) Committed to a hospital, where there are no legal means to buy a gun.
    B) Under supervised release, where there are conditions they have agreed to, such as not owning guns and not doing drugs -- and there are random checks by the mental health authorities.
    C) Free after being treated -- then the person should be able to buy a gun just like the rest of us.
    D) Dead.


    Let's control the "bad guys" not the ordinary citizen buying a gun.