.357 Loading with Std. Small Pistol Primers?

OP
Phred
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OK, Again thank you all for your sage advice. I gratefully accept it all.To throw a bit more mud into the mix...I have loaded and shot near 1,000 rds. of M1 Carbine with H110/296. In working up a load for accuracy, I started with a down load of 1750 fps using std rifle primers. With no repercussions. BTW, my most accurate load was @ 1825 to 1850 fps at 50 yards. Which begs the question, are small rifle primers hotter than std. pistol primers? Cheers!
 

DizzyJ

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OK, Again thank you all for your sage advice. I gratefully accept it all.To throw a bit more mud into the mix...I have loaded and shot near 1,000 rds. of M1 Carbine with H110/296. In working up a load for accuracy, I started with a down load of 1750 fps using std rifle primers. With no repercussions. BTW, my most accurate load was @ 1825 to 1850 fps at 50 yards. Which begs the question, are small rifle primers hotter than std. pistol primers? Cheers!
I'm pretty sure they put out a lot more flame due to the fact they'll have to burn (on average) more powder.
 

Mikej

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OK, Again thank you all for your sage advice. I gratefully accept it all.To throw a bit more mud into the mix...I have loaded and shot near 1,000 rds. of M1 Carbine with H110/296. In working up a load for accuracy, I started with a down load of 1750 fps using std rifle primers. With no repercussions. BTW, my most accurate load was @ 1825 to 1850 fps at 50 yards. Which begs the question, are small rifle primers hotter than std. pistol primers? Cheers!
To muddy YOUR waters further...The Speer 14 book calls for CCI SR Magnum primers for .30 carbine, and the Lyman 49 book calls for Remington 61/2 (SR), and the Lyman 50 book simply states "Small Rifle" , with H110. Whadaya' make of that?
 

jjfitch

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147
OK, Again thank you all for your sage advice. I gratefully accept it all.To throw a bit more mud into the mix...I have loaded and shot near 1,000 rds. of M1 Carbine with H110/296. In working up a load for accuracy, I started with a down load of 1750 fps using std rifle primers. With no repercussions. BTW, my most accurate load was @ 1825 to 1850 fps at 50 yards. Which begs the question, are small rifle primers hotter than std. pistol primers? Cheers!
Please review the "Primer on Primers" information in Post #9. I posted this URL for anyone seeking just about everything you ever wanted to know about primers. Including comparing standard, magnum and rifle primers!

Smiles,
 

2ndtimer

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I have used standard pistol primers with a number of powders in .357 Magnum without issue over the past 40 years or so. Those powders include Unique, Herco, W-231, Universal, CFE Pistol, Power Pistol, Accurate No. 5, Titegroup and Bullseye. I would not use W-296/H-110 with standard primers, especially in cold weather. Save your W-296 for the future when magnum primers are once again available, or find someone willing to trade some SPM for SP. While your rounds will probably all go bang, using standard pistol primers with the slow burning ball powder will have inconsistent burning and lead to erratic velocities. Also, you will have a lot of unburned powder gumming up your firearm. I am also in the camp of 2400 is dirty, especially with standard primers. I even gave up on Blue Dot because it seemed dirty, even with magnum primers.
I really like W-296/H-110 in my .357 revolvers, but only with magnum primers and a good roll crimp. That will provide the best consistent performance, velocity and accuracy for that cartridge, at least in my experience.
 

jjfitch

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I have used standard pistol primers with a number of powders in .357 Magnum without issue over the past 40 years or so. Those powders include Unique, Herco, W-231, Universal, CFE Pistol, Power Pistol, Accurate No. 5, Titegroup and Bullseye. I would not use W-296/H-110 with standard primers, especially in cold weather. Save your W-296 for the future when magnum primers are once again available, or find someone willing to trade some SPM for SP. While your rounds will probably all go bang, using standard pistol primers with the slow burning ball powder will have inconsistent burning and lead to erratic velocities. Also, you will have a lot of unburned powder gumming up your firearm. I am also in the camp of 2400 is dirty, especially with standard primers. I even gave up on Blue Dot because it seemed dirty, even with magnum primers.
I really like W-296/H-110 in my .357 revolvers, but only with magnum primers and a good roll crimp. That will provide the best consistent performance, velocity and accuracy for that cartridge, at least in my experience.
"Winner Winner Chicken dinner!" a nice summary of the previous 31 posts! :)

Bravo!
 
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I have used standard pistol primers with a number of powders in .357 Magnum without issue over the past 40 years or so. Those powders include Unique, Herco, W-231, Universal, CFE Pistol, Power Pistol, Accurate No. 5, Titegroup and Bullseye. I would not use W-296/H-110 with standard primers, especially in cold weather. Save your W-296 for the future when magnum primers are once again available, or find someone willing to trade some SPM for SP. While your rounds will probably all go bang, using standard pistol primers with the slow burning ball powder will have inconsistent burning and lead to erratic velocities. Also, you will have a lot of unburned powder gumming up your firearm. I am also in the camp of 2400 is dirty, especially with standard primers. I even gave up on Blue Dot because it seemed dirty, even with magnum primers.
I really like W-296/H-110 in my .357 revolvers, but only with magnum primers and a good roll crimp. That will provide the best consistent performance, velocity and accuracy for that cartridge, at least in my experience.
I use 2400 in my 44mag loads because it’s accurate and it fills the whole case up unlike H110 plus I get almost the same velocity. It may be dirty but it’s been around for a long time and works good.
 
I've loaded aton of 357mags over the years with standard primers. Loaded some mag primers a few years ago, ran paper and steel comparison off sandbags, in 3 different pistols. No measurable difference noted fir groupng or clanging. Good luck in getting your question settled. Note: my application was range games under 40 yards.
 
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Some powders require magnum primers, some do not. Check the Data... REAL manufacturer data NOT some Bubba & Earl' post... and see if they specify. 296 is one that requires magnum primer as is 4227(I think, better check).
 

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