.357 Loading with Std. Small Pistol Primers?

Messages
110
Reactions
151
I've used small pistol magnum primers for .357 in the past. But now with none in site my only option is the std primers. I have CCI no. 500, and Winchester WSP. How do you think it might affect the the way it shoots? I'm loading up some Hornady 140 gr. XTP's with 16.6 grains of H110. How much difference do you think there will be between the ones I've loaded with magnum primers, and the ones with std. primers? Thanks.
Phred
 

DizzyJ

Messages
4,355
Reactions
4,378
I've used small pistol magnum primers for .357 in the past. But now with none in site my only option is the std primers. I have CCI no. 500, and Winchester WSP. How do you think it might affect the the way it shoots? I'm loading up some Hornady 140 gr. XTP's with 16.6 grains of H110. How much difference do you think there will be between the ones I've loaded with magnum primers, and the ones with std. primers? Thanks.
Phred
What do the reloading manuals say?

I'm guessing possibly not a full efficient powder burn?
 
OP
Phred
Messages
110
Reactions
151
Neither Hornady or Lyman have anything to say about not using magnum primers. Since I'm using Hornady's XTP, going with their data just specifies Win WSPM primers. Since I'm not going for a really big bang, 16.8 gr. is in the middle of the recommended load range. I suppose I'd have to chrono them to see what the effects are. I think I'll just make up a dozen and test them later when the weathers better.
 

Lesliet

Messages
803
Reactions
1,297
What RVTECH said sounds right to me, as well. I tend to end up going the other way, a lot; magnum primers in stuff like .45acp and 9mm Luger, and it doesn't make any noticeable difference on the chrono. I would expect as long as you aren't using real slow powders, or max loads, it should be fine, might watch for unburned powder as a warning that it's not quite in the good pressure zone.
 
Even a full load in a 357 isn't all that much powder. I'd not fret it. It might be few fps slower, but shouldn't be a big deal.
If you're concerned, switch to a faster powder like Blue Dot or even Unique.

Another option, stolen from the 357 Maximum, would be to use small rifle primers. I'd back the powder charge down quite a bit and work back up.
 

RVTECH

Messages
9,326
Reactions
15,471
FWIW I have ALWAYS bought and loaded magnum primers with everything.

Seems I read in a book long ago if you live in a cold climate its recommended to load everything with magnum primers for potential better ignition and I agreed and have always used magnum primers.

I don't ever engage in the silly 'debates' about magnum/standard primers because most who respond appear to be those who do not reload and are just posting about something they know little to nothing about.
 
Last edited:

jjfitch

Messages
96
Reactions
147
MAGNUM powders require MAGNUM primers!

Standard primers for standard powders!

W296 and H110 require MAGNUM primers for proper ignition and complete burn.

Just choose a mid burn rate powder and enjoy sub sonic goodness and manageable recoil!

Everything you always wanted to know about primers!

Click on the RED print below!

"Primer" on primers!

https://www.sksboards.com/smf/index...6fb6135clb3k4&topic=56422.msg646510#msg646510


Lots of information for anyone that uses "primers"!






Smiles,
 
Last edited:
While I've never used a small rifle primer in a 357 Mag, I still have some left over from my old Maximum days.

You never know the background of people posting. Take everything with caution.
 

Mikej

Messages
11,693
Reactions
23,579
What THEY ^^ said.

And consider, the book just tells you what they use in testing, and the results they got with those components. You can use what ever you want, just don't expect the results shown in the book. If you read enough you'll find info on some powers that really need the extra "POP of a magnum primer. There are also many recipes for magnum handgun loads that give good results with standard primers.
 
Messages
215
Reactions
134
Don’t use powders that requires a magnum primer I’ve used both they work fine. Look in your loading manuals, I know the Lyman manual have both or spend $5 and buy the one caliber book.
 
OP
Phred
Messages
110
Reactions
151
Dyjital
Thanks for the idea about CFE Pistol. I've used H110/296 which works as advertised using magnum primers. I also have some CFE Pistol I've used for 38Spl, so I could try some of that with std. primers. It would be a lot easier if powders and primers were still available. Cheers to everyone for the good thoughts on this.
 

Spitpatch

Messages
2,716
Reactions
3,056
50 plus years with the .357. Haven't varied my loads much because I haven't varied my application much (hunting). I load for accuracy and performance with jacketed bullets. When the gun sees guard duty, a hunting load is perfect.

Powders of choice:

231
Blue Dot

I played with 2400 for a brief spell. I look upon it as "dirty".

Never installed a magnum primer. Chronograph shows consistency.
 
OP
Phred
Messages
110
Reactions
151
Thanks again for the help. The manufactures load books are so different and misleading, you always have to look at their test specs and use some caution. For example, Lyman uses a 4" test barrel, while Hornady uses a 10" test barrel. How many people do you know that have a 10" .357? Consequently, there's no way to compare the two sources. I wish the company's would get together and set some standards. Yeah I know, snivel snivel. My burn rate chart doesn't list CFE Pistol, so I can't compare it with H110.
 
Thanks again for the help. The manufactures load books are so different and misleading, you always have to look at their test specs and use some caution. For example, Lyman uses a 4" test barrel, while Hornady uses a 10" test barrel. How many people do you know that have a 10" .357? Consequently, there's no way to compare the two sources. I wish the company's would get together and set some standards. Yeah I know, snivel snivel. My burn rate chart doesn't list CFE Pistol, so I can't compare it with H110.
10" .357?

Hell, mine'r 5.5" and 20".

In the same boat as you and needing to develop a load for them.
 
My Ruger SRM in 357 Max was 10.5". I didn't have a chrono back then, but made several soft loads for it.
One experiment with cast bullets showed me what powder position and squibs were, long before I read about them. I was smart enough to realize something was wrong and not shoot another bullet into the one stuck into the bore. I decided that if I wanted lighter loads they were best done in 357 and 38 cases.

Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from poor judgement.

While I like Blue Dot and Unique, both of them are fairly dirty, too.

H110 (or WW296) is my favorite, but since I didn't have another magnum pistol until recently, I've been caught with my pants down as far as having a supply of it.
 
Messages
34
Reactions
40
I would not do it. H110 is often said to be more squib-prone than other handgun powders, hard to ignite and not down-loadable. I've only used H110 sparingly in top loads (mostly in some .44 Redhawk-only recipes from Handloader May 2010 or some month near there) with magnum primers.

Regular small pistol primers are pretty anemic, based on the photos I've seen of people somehow firing a more-or-less naked primer.

Can you trade someone for a little 2400? That powder is supposedly better with a regular primer, not magnum. Of course, you won't equal the performance of H110 with it, but it will outrun the medium-burners.

My advice is worth exactly what you paid me for it.
 

Mikej

Messages
11,693
Reactions
23,579
Thanks again for the help. The manufactures load books are so different and misleading, you always have to look at their test specs and use some caution. For example, Lyman uses a 4" test barrel, while Hornady uses a 10" test barrel. How many people do you know that have a 10" .357? Consequently, there's no way to compare the two sources. I wish the company's would get together and set some standards. Yeah I know, snivel snivel. My burn rate chart doesn't list CFE Pistol, so I can't compare it with H110.
Again, the books aren't misleading. The books show the results of a recipe. It's up to you to use that info as your starting point. Your mind needs to grasp that a 10' barrel will likely produce more velocity than a 4" barrel using the same components, bullet/powder/primer. Your mind should also consider in that case that a slower powder may be more appropriate in the 10" barrel as it has more time to burn than in a 4" barrel. And peak pressure may be less also with the slower powder. The slower powder in a 4" barrel may have unburnt powder after the bullet leaves the barrel.
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

Free Firearms Safety Course Webinar (I-1639 Compliant)
Virtual Webinar (Zoom). Registration Link in the course description.
Washington, USA
Rimfire Challenge Feb 13th @ DRRC
Douglas Ridge Rifle Club
27787 OR-224, Eagle Creek, OR 97022, USA
Albany Rifle & Pistol Club (ARPC) Gun Show
Linn County Expo Center
3700 Knox Butte Rd E, Albany, OR 97322, USA
Rimfire Challenge May 8th @ DRRC
Douglas Ridge Rifle Club
27787 OR-224, Eagle Creek, OR 97022, USA

LATEST RESOURCE REVIEWS

  • Paul A Martin Historical Guns
    5.00 star(s)
    Great shop, selection and atmosphere
    One of the better firearm shop experiences I’ve had, Paul is very patient and helpful. Definitely going to be a repeat customer even though it’s...
  • Adaptive Firing Solutions
    5.00 star(s)
    Great Service! A+
    Steve is a very nice guy and very easy to work with. I've done business with him a few times and will continue to.
  • Adaptive Firing Solutions
    5.00 star(s)
    Great guy!
    Steve is a great guy to deal with!
  • HighLine Firearms
    5.00 star(s)
    Nice Home Shop
    Had what I wanted at a good price. Messaged me when in stock.
  • Adaptive Firing Solutions
    5.00 star(s)
    Excellent Service
    Steve is an excellent guy to deal with. After looking at some Form 4 items at another dealer who didnt seem interested in my money, i emailed...
Top Bottom