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Tiny Motorboat in a Pickup?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by teflon97239, Nov 7, 2015.

  1. teflon97239

    teflon97239 Portland, OR Well-Known Member

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    I’ve got experience with a lot of boats and I’d be comfy crabbing in my canoe on a calm day somewhere like Newport Bay. But my usually outdoorsy and versatile GF believes we’d capsize my 14’ Mirrocraft canoe pulling crab rings. Hell, she might even be right - and I can certainly imagine handier floor plans for crab rings, buckets, etc. But I'm not towing my fresh water ski boat to/from the coast, and it's already winterized until spring.

    So my mind caught fire the other day when I saw a tiny aluminum boat riding snugly in the bed of a 4WD Dakota just like mine. I was thinking that could be just about right with a little 4-5hp motor I could “winterize” year ‘round by simply draining it after each use. Seems light enough that the two of us could easily yank it out of the truck, screw the motor on and complete a Dungeness mission with little/no fuss.

    Never had a motorboat that light or compact, so I’m looking for ideas/pointers/cautions that’ll help me refine my search quickly. Primitive and funky are fine as long as it’s reliable. What are you guys and gals using for super compact rigs?
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2015
  2. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I am confused.

    A boat smaller than the 14' Mirrorcraft is the solution to fears about capsizing?

    I spent summer vacations with my parents and 2 brothers in a 16' rented wooden boat at Newport, fishing well out beyond the bar (albeit on gentle swells) and crabbing in the bay.

    Granted - given my experience in the USCG (3+ years of SAR at Newport), I wouldn't advise people to go out like that on the ocean in such a small boat - two adults and 3 kids.

    But I don't see the problem with a nice 14' fishing boat crabbing in a bay or on a river if you stay away from the mouth of the river on calm waters. If you are reasonably careful it shouldn't capsize.

    If you are concerned that the v-hull of your fishing boat is too tippy, try renting a more flat bottomed dory and see how that works for you?
     
  3. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    You'd do better in something with higher sides on the bay...
     
  4. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    Two people? A couple of buckets and some lightweight Danielson's crab pots, or crab rings?
    Stay in the bay and have at it! Wear your PFDs, watch the big boy's wakes and go slay some dungies.

    I may even have a couple of extra rings you can have.
     
    decklin likes this.
  5. teflon97239

    teflon97239 Portland, OR Well-Known Member

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    Sorry guys, I was unclear. So I went back and edited my OP.

    My 14" Mirrocraft is a canoe. I've seen crabbing from a canoe, and I'd do it myself, but my kayaking GF isn't as comfy in a canoe as I am. Especially hauling rings.

    So a 12' dingy of some sort with a motor would probably be more to her liking, and a damn sight more comfortable with rings, buckets, ropes and gear on the floor between us.
     
  6. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    I was talking about an aluminum boat ala SmokerCraft etc. I've seen plenty of people do it.
    Just learn to pick your days, stay in the bay(s), watch the tides and the wakes and wear your PFDs.
     
  7. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Oh, okay.

    Yes - most canoes are pretty tippy - unless you equip them with outriggers.

    One option would be a flatboat dingy - assuming you stay away from the ocean and rough water. You could maybe find these on craigslist as they are common for duck hunting. Some would fit in a small pickup bed.

    Another option would be a folding boat. There are number of different types and brands, but one has been around for quite a while and can take an outboard.

    http://www.porta-bote.com/
     
  8. Capn Jack

    Capn Jack Wet-Stern Washington Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    The 14' Lund is a nice aluminum boat that a lot of resorts use as rentals.;)
     
  9. Oregonhunter5

    Oregonhunter5 2C IDAHO Well-Known Member

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    Hell no. Heelllll no!
    Screw that!
     
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  10. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    SHARRRRRRRK!!!! :eek:
     
  11. jackrv

    jackrv Wood Village, Oregon Platinum Supporter Platinum Supporter

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    Nothing under 350 feet for me :D
     
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  12. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Always have a good anchor/rope in case the motor kraps out and always go crabbing on the incoming tide.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2015
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  13. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    attachment.php?attachmentid=27895&d=1425367123.jpg

    Here is what I was on in Newport:


    We didn't fear puny little sharks. Hell - a 500+ freighter ran over the original '44 MLB and didn't sink it.
     
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  14. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Or worse yet - the outgoing tide if you are inside the jetties.
     
  15. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    That's where the good anchor and rope come in handy.
     
  16. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    You live in Idaho.
    Until the subduction zone gives way, you have nothing to worry about.
    :D
     
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  17. Stomper

    Stomper Oceania Rising White Is The New Brown Silver Supporter

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    LMAO!!!!
     
  18. Oregonhunter5

    Oregonhunter5 2C IDAHO Well-Known Member

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    I have a fear of large water. I hate sharks. I hate rip tides. I hate tide.
    But for some strange reason, I love and have a tremendous draw towards deadliest catch. The power of the ocean is from God. Of course we ditched cable two year ago, so I only see minutes of it when in a hotel.
     
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  19. Jamie6.5

    Jamie6.5 Western OR Well-Known Member

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    I seem to recall someone told me mormons often feel that way about water. You are LDS are you not?
     
  20. Oregonhunter5

    Oregonhunter5 2C IDAHO Well-Known Member

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    Yep. I am.
    But I saw someone get pulled from battle ground lake after being under for 15 minutes. Blue. My dad pulled him out. He lived for a month in a coma.
    Not sure why my folks would fear water. Seems they all wake board, and raft.