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target shooting approach

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by tlfreek, Nov 30, 2013.

  1. tlfreek

    tlfreek Vancouver WA Active Member

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    so I went shooting at the range today and it's apparent to me that I am not getting any worse of a shot, but then i don't think i am improving much either.

    I can see where the projectiles are going, make adjustments and I can see the groupings (I say this very loosely) improve - however I am wondering what how you guys shoot at targets. I typically have two targets and several firearms and basically use one on each side of the target. Because its a group shooting range I typically unload somewhere of 40 to 70 rounds on each target before the range goes cold. This is where I wonder if I am making a mistake. Should I shoot slower with less rounds on each target or go keep shooting pick the average of where the holes are and call it good.

    not looking for miracles just ways that I can help improve and gauge accuracy.

    thanks.
     
  2. tlfreek

    tlfreek Vancouver WA Active Member

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    BTW I dont have an easy way of telling where the rounds land so I have to really study the targets. I suspect one of those optic devices to magnify the target after each go would be ideal.
     
  3. Dunerunner

    Dunerunner You'll Never Know Well-Known Member

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    Move the targets closer until the groupings are where you like them, then start moving them away 1 yard at a time. Oh, if pistol shooting, pay attention to your stance and grip the same every time. Load a snap cap somewhere in the magazine or cylinder and check for flinch or anticipation. Load snap caps and check to see if your trigger pull isn't dragging the muzzle off target.

    Three rounds per target...

    And........Practice, Practice, Practice!!
     
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  4. Rotty

    Rotty Skagit County Active Member

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    Fire only Three rounds at a time until you get proficient and gradually increase to six. I like using snap caps in the mix for the very reason Dunerunner mentioned. Have someone watch you shoot preferably someone with more shooting experience than you so they can critique your stance, grip, trigger pull etc.
     
  5. Spitpatch

    Spitpatch Forest Grove, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Well, tlf, there's some pretty good advice already posted here, but none of them saw fit to even ask what the heck you're shooting.

    Again: it's good advice, I'm just not sure what they were advising you on. (I'd bet a shiny nickel they weren't too sure either.)

    If you are interested in accuracy (as you should fundamentally be), then 40-70 rounds is way too much to fire before compiling results (I'll join your stalwart advisors here in ignorance of what you are shooting, but my speculative advice I think would not be disputed in ANY application).

    Accuracy and precision testing is done in much smaller amounts (even microscopic when compared to your significant current test-tube volume).

    You need to go into this with much more detail and patience (expressed favorably in ammunition expenses). Supplied with that knowledge, persons here with some more experience will advise and carry you to success. Those who've answered without any idea of what you were doing certainly mean well, and gave good advice with ignorance that was not of their own making.
     
  6. saxon

    saxon springfield Active Member

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    matters not what you shoot but HOW you shoot

    sightpic1.gif
    with 40 to 70 rounds teh center should be shot out of an 8" target

    sightpic1.gif
     
  7. Sgt Nambu

    Sgt Nambu Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Dude, you need a spotting scope! Large paper/many bullseyes. Three rounds per bull. Practice the fundamentals, site picture, breathing control, trigger control. What you are looking for is to exactly repeat the series of actions that leads to discharge. The most important skill to learn, IMHO, is calling your shots! If you jerked the trigger or just shook, what ever calamity happened to throw that bullet off target needs to be understood as the projectile leaves the barrel! When you mark your target draw a circle around the round and mark it called. I have always had difficulty explaining the concept! Thankfully I'm better at doing it than explaining it. One other thing, I use the 6 o'clock edge of the bullseye as the aiming point. It is a clearly delineated line on the target. I hope that all the sound advice given by the other members and myself helps. Good luck!!!
     
  8. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    Go for accuracy first and then speed, especially in "target" shooting.
    Make believe that you only have one shot and make it count.. do your very best with each shot. Focus on the front sight, yadda. Repeat. Only hits count no matter the distance or speed.. save that you might rattle the guy with a near miss (didn't gather what type of shoot you're doing though).. still have to hit regardless though.
    Anyway, good luck.
     
  9. Mikej

    Mikej Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    All of the above, and......

    If your shooting hand gun, (might work for long gun too) print out a thing called "Wheel of Misfortune", that will give you a good idea of why your shots go where they do. Take a pair of binoculars to the range with you. I prefer targets without black, it's too hard to see hit's in black and you can't see the circles with pen around the hits up close even. Dry-fire practice, practice, practice.

    Mike
     
  10. Rotty

    Rotty Skagit County Active Member

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    Spitpatch :drink: you are absolutely right (at least on my end). I assumed the OP was talking about handguns. I have to admit it did not even cross my mind to ask. The OP did offer a clue which I did not catch at first. He used the word "Optic" to see the target. Unless someone has really bad eye sight it is probably not likely he would need optics to see the targets at 7-25 yards.

    :)
     
  11. Blitzkrieg

    Blitzkrieg WA Well-Known Member

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    Following up on Spitpatch's post

    Rifle/handgun?

    What Caliber? What load? (Brand/weight)

    If it's a centerfire, do you have a similar 22LR you can target shoot with? This is how many great shootists got started, and many return regularly to the 22 for target shooting to renew fundamentals. 22s are cheaper to shoot and some can be a lot of fun. I have a new STG44-22 and it's fun and a big hit with everyone on the range

    If a rifle, you should be checking every shot as you go with a spotting scope, and have the rifle scope or irons properly sighted in

    If a handgun you should be shooting no further than 10 yards and hopefully closer until you master the weapon

    Either way slow way down and go for proper grip/stance/trigger technique. We must crawl before we can walk, and then run
     
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  12. Otter

    Otter Oregon - mid Willamette Valley Active Member

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    I take 3 or 4 center fire rifles to the 100 and 200/300 yard range. I never shoot more than 30 rounds out of each rifle for two reasons. One, shooting many more than that means you are shooting to fast, thus getting the barrel overly hot. A hot barrel will begin to shoot flyers and will burn up the rifling inside. Second, extreme accuracy tends to drop off after a barrel gets fouled, which I find starts to happen after 25-30 rounds. (The exception to that is if you use moly or some other barrel coating substance.) If you are shooting 40-70 rounds between cold ranges, I suspect both those factors are seriously limiting tight groups for you.

    For each rifle, I have an 8 1/2 by 11 inch sheet of paper with six targets on it. I shoot five, five round groups on each sheet of paper. With a light barrel sporter rifle I will shoot three shot groups instead of five.

    Often my 4th rifle is my 22LR that I blast away with to give my other rifles time for the barrels to cool. Practicing with a 22LR is a fantastic way to refine your technique.

    Knowing more about what you are shooting, what kind of ammo you are shooting distances, and what your expectations are would really help. If you want to hold 1/2 MOA groups, that is one thing. If all you want to do is contain your group to a body cutout at 50 yards is another.
     
  13. Ironbar

    Ironbar Tigard, OR Well-Known Member

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