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Sometimes just a little coaching is needed

Discussion in 'Education & Training' started by twoclones, Dec 3, 2010.

  1. twoclones

    twoclones Tri-Cities, WA Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday afternoon a neighbor came to my door asking me to speak with her son on her cellphone. He's a good kid, away at Job Corps trying to fix his life and I would describe his mother as borderline insane.

    Anyway, the son tells me that a stranger has moved in with his Mom and she want's him out but is afraid of him. All he asks is that I check on her in the evening. "Of course I will." Then I talk with her about it... Wow. The guy is another neighbor's ex-husband, convicted felon, drug addict. I dont know him but I know his record.

    He had been invited in for dinner and was given $20, because of his hard luck story, then sent on his way. He returned later that evening with his girlfriend and they moved in while my neighbor stood there in shock.

    What to do? If she had been my Mom violence would have been the answer. But she isn't my Mom and this couple had already spent one night and were away for the afternoon. So I coached her a little.

    I told her to tell her 'guests' they had 15 minutes to leave or she would call the cops. If they said anything which made her uncomfortable, just walk down here to my door and I'll call the cops. She was concerned he'd whine about his bad back or the girl would steal something. I advised, don't argue or negotiate and don't worry about your things; just walk down here to my door.

    At 8:00 p.m. there had been no screaming or dogs barking so I walked over to check on her. She'd done what I told her and the 'guests' had left. That was one happy woman and I managed to stay out of the mess. :)
     
  2. BigCat

    BigCat Portland Member

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    Good read. Would read again.
     
  3. MarkSBG

    MarkSBG Beaverton Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Good advice. Hopefully she won't see them again.
     
  4. Decker

    Decker My house Active Member

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    Dang, talk about preying on someone with a soft heart. What a douche. Nicely done, TC.

    -d
     
  5. MA Duce

    MA Duce Central Oregon Well-Known Member

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    One suggestion....get his name to the local authorities and they can contact his parole officer. A friendly word from the PO might ensure he won't even think about returning.
     
  6. atypicalparkie

    atypicalparkie sowfeast poetland, ohraygun Member

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    ...and good job there, twoclones!! You're the kind of neighbor that everybody would be proud to have. One of my Aunts who lives hundreds of miles away has had ongoing issues with her grandson... meth, prison, released, relapse, repeat etc. He's robbed her blind over and over again and she's finally (at age 80) found the strength to call the police and his PO whenever he comes around. Compassion is a very good thing, but your neighbor was sorely taken advantage of. Glad she's got a neighbor like you looking out for her :thumbup:
     
  7. twoclones

    twoclones Tri-Cities, WA Well-Known Member

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    "Preying" seems to be a little too common amoung meth/crack head types. A friend of mine had to rescue is father from a similar situation. The father apparently had an alcohol problem of his own and was a soft touch. The druggies moved in with him and eventually convinced him to sign over his house. It was very bad! House was legally theirs and it sounds like the father was being abused. :(