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Slamming bolt shut on semiauto Shotgun?

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by mouse, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. mouse

    mouse Pacific Northwest Active Member

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    I've had my FN SLP for a few months now. Its a beautiful shotgun, and something to admire. I can't figure out if I'm doing harm to it however. Its a spendy shotgun so I want to treat it right. When I pull the bolt back (when the gun is empty) and i'm done inspecting it or simply admiring it, I go ahead and push the bolt release button and let that sucker slam closed. Should I be gently guiding the bolt forward by its handle when I release the button, or is it correct to let it slam. I can't find any information in my user's manual on this topic. Thank you for your help.
    -Cameron
     
  2. the4thshake

    the4thshake Portland Active Member

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    What do you think it does every time you fire it?
     
  3. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Normally it slams shut on a brass shell. That's a lot different then when empty.
     
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  4. mouse

    mouse Pacific Northwest Active Member

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    thats was my concern.
     
  5. Key-Hay

    Key-Hay North Carolina Active Member

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    Put it right up there with the urban legend that dry firing a 22LR will cause damage. Most if not all modern firearms are designed for far more torture than the average enthusiast can dish out. I wouldn't worry about it.
     
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  6. Benkei

    Benkei WA New Member

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    Dry firing a 22lr can absolutely cause damage. Because it is a rimfire, the firing pin hits the edge of the chamber where the rim would be. I bought a used Beretta 21a, (little 22lr pistol) that had metal peening into the chamber from where the firing pin was hitting the rim. A little work with jewelers files fixed it though.
     
  7. mouse

    mouse Pacific Northwest Active Member

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    I'm dying here guys, 5 comments and not a single direct answer. I appreciate the responses but they are not answering my question. Does it cause damage to the shotgun?
     
  8. Key-Hay

    Key-Hay North Carolina Active Member

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    The cowboy action guys I shoot with dry practice thousands of times at home with 1897 pump shotguns. I do as well and am using a chinese copy of a worn out Winchester 1897. I have dry slammed mine 6000-7000 times in the last 6 months. I think you're OK.
     
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  9. Key-Hay

    Key-Hay North Carolina Active Member

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  10. jbett98

    jbett98 NW Oregon Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    I will say yes, it will over time.
    My question to you is, why the concern? Why the need to release the bolt on an empty chamber.
    You can make some dummy rounds with a couple of fired shells, just fill them with some playdough or glazing putty and fold over the ends.
    The weight will be the same, just mark them with a magic marker so you know there duds.
     
  11. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    Yes you will cause some un needed wear. I work on a ton of rifles, pistols and shotguns every year.
    22 LR is the worse, I have seen thousands upon thousands of dollars in damage done while dry firing. But by all means keep doing it, it keeps me fed and warm at night :bluelaugh:
    Dry fire your standard Ruger automatic, mkII or III or 22/45. DO it 6000-7000 times over the next 6 months. You will be peening over the edge of the chamber with every single trigger pull. You can either pay me to set the barrel back a turn and make the chamber abit deeper, or put a new barrel on it. Dont believe everything u read on the net.

    In design it was meant to close on a shell. So when you hit the release, ease it home by hand. You wont hurt it dry firing it, unless you do it 10,000 times. The firing pin may just decide to let go.
    Buy yourself some snap caps to use or even an empty shell. Filling one with playdough and topping it off with epoxy works well.
     
  12. Bushman

    Bushman Auburn, WA Well-Known Member

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    Agreed...Seems pretty common; lot's of posts, no actual answers until you point it out and get it back on track. :-(
     
  13. the4thshake

    the4thshake Portland Active Member

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    It's fine. :thumbup: A gun is a tool meant to be used. There is no need to treat it like grandmas fine china.
     
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