Sizing .40 question

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by fish1260, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. fish1260

    fish1260
    SW WA
    Member

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    So, I have been loading all my own rifle ammunition, but never seen the need to load pistol as I do not shoot in nearly enough quantity. I recently came across a large quantity of range brass at scrap prices, (see my add for .40 brass for sale if you want some, lol), so I figured I might as well process and load some .40. With brand new (Lee) dies it seems as though it is under sizing the base of the case, just above the case head. On a clean, but not polished case it is hardly noticeable, but on a polished case it is easy to see (picture will be attached). There is no abrupt crease, but can be felt with a fingernail. I do not have a case gauge for .40 yet, but they do drop in and out freely from the chamber of a USP and Glock. Dies adjusted per Lee instructions. Since I haven't been loading any straight wall pistol cases I figure I should ask what you guys think? Normal? Am I doing something wrong/stupid? Something up with the die?
     
  2. fish1260

    fish1260
    SW WA
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    hmm....standby while I figure out why attachments are not working.

    well, I am losing the battle of posting a picture tonight, I'll try again tomorrow.

    Most of my research seems to lead towards it being a result of glock fired brass, however, there really was very little expansion/bulge to start with. The result is the same with or without running through a lee bulge buster, and there is no ridge to speak of, the case concave, narrower at, or just above the web?

    Since I cant make the picture work, I took and measured about a dozen cases. At the case mouth all were .421-.422. At the base they were all .424-.425. And in the low area that I am curious about most were .419-.420, I saw one .418 and a couple .421/22. I guess that is all pretty much right on spec, is it normal to not have a truly uniform straight wall?
     
  3. gunfreak

    gunfreak
    Boise
    Well-Known Member

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    I think you are over thinking the whole thing, I'm sure if a woman was reloading .40's it would be that way, sorry ladies:D. I use Lee dies and reload a bunch of .40 and never had any issues with sizing. As long as you set it up correctly all is well.
     
  4. AMProducts

    AMProducts
    Maple Valley, WA
    Jerk, Ammo Manufacturer

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    Brass is a fluid medium, even though it outwardly appears to be a solid, at the pressures experienced inside a firearm it flows like a gel.

    Typically the case mouth gets work hardened by loading and processing, and the middle will end up being softer. This ends up with a slight hourglass shape (as you mention).

    I know some people who aggressively try to remove the "bulge" with roll sizers and push through sizers and all other kinds of things. I've never noticed this to be a real concern, and all the "range brass shot through glocks" that's supposed to be completely useless and dangerous seems to resize and shoot just fine, even after hundreds of thousands of rounds I have yet to see any real issues with 9mm or .40 brass that wasn't push-through sized. OTOH, that hourglass shape can be fixed by using a set of dies that are properly sized. I don't have that issue with my .40 S&W RCBS dies... look like new ammo.
     
  5. Kevatc

    Kevatc
    Oregon
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    For what it's worth I've cycled a lot of my 40 brass as many as 12-15 times.
     
  6. cookie

    cookie
    Idaho.
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    I have had the Glock 40 brass bulge problem.
     
  7. deadshot2

    deadshot2
    NW Quadrant WA State
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    For those that don't have brass with a "bulge" it will never be a problem. For those that do, it's a big problem if their firearm won't allow it to fully chamber a reladed cartridge.

    For the price of a Lee "Bulge Buster" kit ($20) why not "Just Do It".

    I use a factory crimp die on all my 9mm reloads pretty much for the same basic reason. Not so much because I need a fancy crimp but because I am insuring that ALL my rounds will chamber fully.

    Using the "bulge buster" on range pickup brass is just a measure of insurance.
     

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