RE: Gun Show Vendors......

Mikej

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Wifey and I went to the Albany gun show. Holy cow what a fine bunch of firearms, and way too many people to allow a person to look at all the goodness! I'll have to decide if I'm going to go to the next one though. I know we got lucky in that it was raining because everyone is just standing out it the open waiting to get in!

A message to some of the vendors at the show.....If you don't want people to touch your guns I suggest you stay home, put your guns behind Plexiglas or have a BIG sign with bright red lettering. When I step up to your table and eyeball something I'm not looking 2'-3' away for a hand written postcard that says not to touch without permission. It's the GUN that drew my attention. And the extra note, that I didn't see but Wifey did, that said "It's amazing how many people don't read signs" You made me feel stupid. I only hope that next time I see the signs first so I don't end up feeling like a moron, OR, even think about spending money with you.

There were guys at the show with 100 year old Winchesters, displayed on horizontal racks, that didn't have signs to not touch their guns! And I'm smart enough that once I look at the hang tag that says $2500.00- $3500.00-$7500 to ask for permission to fondle. I've just got to wonder now if some of the guns I took from a rack to look closer at had "Don't Touch" signs somewhere I didn't see? The vendor dude was standing right there and never said a word?

Any way it just seems strange that someone comes to a gun show to sell. We go to find something to buy. The vendor puts guns out that aren't high dollar collectibles right there in the open but doesn't want people to touch them? o_O
 
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Probably the vendor is used to doing the PDX shows where all his stuff gets jacked off his tables....

When I am at a gun show and see something that I want to look at closer or pick up I generally try to make eye contact with the vendor, motion to the item I would like to see closer, and or ask to pick it up first. In this case it is usually easier to get permission first than forgiveness later....

How did that quote go now? "Be polite to everyone you meet, but have a plan to kill them."
 
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To the OP: The same exact thing happened to me a while ago where my wife had to tell me about the sign. The person at the booth yelled at me not to touch so I walked away feeling really stupid and embarrassed. I haven't gone to a gun show since. Honestly, I get my entertainment by visiting gun shops and just keep to my self.
 
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A message to some of the vendors at the show.....If you don't want people to touch your guns I suggest you stay home, put your guns behind Plexiglas or have a BIG sign with bright red lettering. When I step up to your table and eyeball something I'm not looking 2'-3' away for a hand written postcard that says not to touch without permission. It's the GUN that drew my attention. And the extra note, that I didn't see but Wifey did, that said "It's amazing how many people don't read signs" You made me feel stupid. I only hope that next time I see the signs first so I don't end up feeling like a moron, OR, even think about spending money with you.
Exactly. When I worked for a vendor, the attitude was they didn't want inventory dropped. The attitude at that point was you dropped it; you buy it. I agreed with it but I also didn't agree with having signs that made people feel their at a window shopping event. The industry has changed from when I was a young man. Not for the better. Let's face it...You have customers who buy guns based purely off cosmetics, will never shoot them, a good portion of vendors just talk s#@& about other vendors and customers. People go to a gun show because they want to have a good time. I had a couple of sales that felt rewarding because maybe it was the buyers first gun, ect.

I'll go to a gun show if I'm bored...But I pretty much keep my purchases to sportsman's or Ed's guns and gear where I know a guy like Ed has class and integrity. Sorry if I offend any vendors reading this. I have been screwed over and cheated twice. It's put a chip on my shoulder and I won't be returning until I have my own ffl.
 

Mark W.

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Interesting I been going to gun shows since at least 1968 (I own one of the rifles I stood next to my dad when he bought it in 1968 at the old Albany Gun show at the OLD fair grounds) And at age 59 I still walk through a show with my hands in my pockets. I wouldn't think of touching a firearm or anything more then a 2 bit item before asking permission.

As a kid I grew up going to Gun shows Antique Bottle shows and we were taught to respect that the items on the table were not ours to play with. So we kept our hands in our pockets.

I spent 14 years as a Custom Knifemaker and I can tell you that many peoples sweat and hand oils are very corrosive especially women. I have had carbon steel blades permanently etched by having someone fondle the blade and me not catch it to wipe it off. Pretty hard to deny where the mark came from when its a nice finger print that you have to sand and polish out to remove.

I can see where having a sign might make someone annoyed but really have you ever spent a whole day trying to keep something that is New or valuable from suffering from table rash? I have. Its a lot of work.

When you go to car shows you always see signs about not touching the cars some suggest you might get your butt kicked if you do.
 
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Interesting I been going to gun shows since at least 1968 (I own one of the rifles I stood next to my dad when he bought it in 1968 at the old Albany Gun show at the OLD fair grounds) And at age 59 I still walk through a show with my hands in my pockets. I wouldn't think of touching a firearm or anything more then a 2 bit item before asking permission.

As a kid I grew up going to Gun shows Antique Bottle shows and we were taught to respect that the items on the table were not ours to play with. So we kept our hands in our pockets.

I spent 14 years as a Custom Knifemaker and I can tell you that many peoples sweat and hand oils are very corrosive especially women. I have had carbon steel blades permanently etched by having someone fondle the blade and me not catch it to wipe it off. Pretty hard to deny where the mark came from when its a nice finger print that you have to sand and polish out to remove.

I can see where having a sign might make someone annoyed but really have you ever spent a whole day trying to keep something that is New or valuable from suffering from table rash? I have. Its a lot of work.

When you go to car shows you always see signs about not touching the cars some suggest you might get your butt kicked if you do.
Except vendors don't use gloves when they handle their inventory, nor do they care about corrosion in storage.
 
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I guess i have a different ''look'' at this post. My parents taught me, if some thing does not belong to you, do not touch it. I have never just walked in to a gun show and started picking up guns. If guns are handled all the time, it shows in the long run. Greasy finger prints, sweaty hands, can damage a blued finish fast. Rings on your fingers, bumping it against another gun can dent, scratch, damage a firearm. I've never had anyone yell at me at any gun show, about handling a firearm. Why, because i always ask first, i never ever assume i can pick a firearm up with out asking. If you feel ''stupid'' or insulted, i'd suggest you do stay home. These people have a lot of money invested in their wares, why do more damage to it by handling it.

Allow the sellers the courtesy of asking if you can pick an item up before you do, then you won't be embarrassed or feel stupid. I've gone to gun shows all over this state, including portland, never , ever, have i been challenged by a vendor, seller, etc about handling a gun. Price wise, if i pick up a 300.00 dollar rifle, pistol, i treat it with the same respect i would a 2500-5000.00 rifle. Its just common courtesy.
 
OP
Mikej

Mikej

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Interesting I been going to gun shows since at least 1968 (I own one of the rifles I stood next to my dad when he bought it in 1968 at the old Albany Gun show at the OLD fair grounds) And at age 59 I still walk through a show with my hands in my pockets. I wouldn't think of touching a firearm or anything more then a 2 bit item before asking permission.

As a kid I grew up going to Gun shows Antique Bottle shows and we were taught to respect that the items on the table were not ours to play with. So we kept our hands in our pockets.

I spent 14 years as a Custom Knifemaker and I can tell you that many peoples sweat and hand oils are very corrosive especially women. I have had carbon steel blades permanently etched by having someone fondle the blade and me not catch it to wipe it off. Pretty hard to deny where the mark came from when its a nice finger print that you have to sand and polish out to remove.

I can see where having a sign might make someone annoyed but really have you ever spent a whole day trying to keep something that is New or valuable from suffering from table rash? I have. Its a lot of work.

When you go to car shows you always see signs about not touching the cars some suggest you might get your butt kicked if you do.
Real good perspective Mark. I might be wrong to an extent in my feeling about this! I never looked at it the other way. I'm pretty damned new to firearms compared to the vast majority here. I'm 62 and only been in the game 7 years! I'm still a child when it comes to firearms.

I don't go and hit every table grabbing onto anything and everything. Some guns just need to be fondled though, otherwise what's the point in going, or the point in a vendor putting the gun right out there on a table? So, I guess, in my limited experience I just figured handling a gun you would want to own was just the norm! Funny though, all those guns I saw at the show 70-80-90...100 years old weren't rotted completely away with all the handling they must have had huh? :D

Anyway, from this point forward I'll still fondle what I feel the urge to fondle. With the respect I've always treated other's property. I'll hope that I SEE these not to touch without permission notes so I can pass by that table, (unless, of course, I really need to fondle). And continue to respect the obvious heirloom guns by not fondling without asking permission, weather or not there's a sign.

And by the way @Mark W. Wifey and I drove the back way from the show yesterday . We passed through Jefferson ,turner, Aumsville and your little slice of heaven, Silverton! It really helps the psyche to get out and away from this ugly city for awhile. You must love it out there!
 
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To the OP: The same exact thing happened to me a while ago where my wife had to tell me about the sign. The person at the booth yelled at me not to touch so I walked away feeling really stupid and embarrassed. I haven't gone to a gun show since. Honestly, I get my entertainment by visiting gun shops and just keep to my self.
Yeah we would have had words
 
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There's truth to comments from both sides of the issue.

My hunch is it's the way the vendor handled the "situation" that prompted the initial post.
Exactly this. I have a hard time articulating sometimes but this is it in a nutshell.

I do agree vendors have a lot invested. I do agree handling harms the value. However...If you're a vendor or ever become one...Lol don't sit on your inventory like it's made of gold and don't sit in a chair looking like you don't enjoy life and make no effort to actually sell guns. Lol.
 
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I agree with 66PonyCar's post above this one.
I always ask, whether at a gun show or a gun shop. We aren't looking at socks here.
They are expensive weapons and deserve some respect as does the dealer.
I find it helps to start the conversation with a little bit of good will.
If they say "No" I would move on and look elsewhere although that has never happened.
 

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