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Powder metering through Progressive

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by Grizzly_A, Mar 11, 2010.

  1. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    What powders have you found meter the best through the powder measures? Specifically I'm wondering about the Hornady L&L AP powder dispenser and the default powder drop.
     
  2. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    The only ones that don't meter well for me are the longer extruded powders. Some manufacturers chop those into short pieces and they work fine, and of course ball powders work fine.

    With each decision to choose a powder, you should find that out about it.
     
  3. motoman98

    motoman98 Gresham, OR Active Member

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    For the longer grain powders, you need to look at the Quick Measure. None like it.
     
  4. elfman

    elfman good ol' USA New Member

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    I have the Hornady Lock N Load progressive press, also. Fine piece of machinery. Most progressives like the ball type powders best. My favorites are Accurate 2460 and Ramshot TAC. TAC meters incredibly well. Most loads throw within + or - .1 grain on a 26 grain load. Hope it helps.
     
  5. Ben B.

    Ben B. Eugene Member

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    The Hornady powder measure is excellent. All pistol powders I've tried meter well, but some are slower to dial in. I throw 10 charges at a time into a pill bottle, and divide the weight by 10 to get the average charge weight, then do this 2-3 times to confirm it, then load. I have not found mid-load weight checks to vary from that. if my confirmed charge is 5.0 grains, a spot check weighing of a load of 10 charges ranges from 49.8 to 50.2.
     
  6. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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    Do you buy the powder insert thingy for different loads once you get a load set for quicker powder transitions?
     
  7. Ben B.

    Ben B. Eugene Member

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    I have 2 micrometer stem bar thingies. I load ~4.8 gr for .40 and .45, and 3.4 to 3.6 gr for .38, 9mm and .40 Lite.

    It saves some trouble.
     
  8. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure what you mean because you're probably asking someone who has a different brand press(es) than I.

    Because adjusting the powder measure is a bit time consuming and exacting, and because any caliber or bullet weight swap takes some time, I try to load in batches of 1,000 minimum to make the setup time pay.

    The more you do anything, the easier and faster it gets, too.

    Now, back to your original question... :)
     
  9. Grizzly_A

    Grizzly_A Portland Metro Area Member

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  10. CXD Arms

    CXD Arms Evergreen State New Member

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    The Hornady LNL metering inserts are exactly for that purpose. The Lock-N-Load (LNL) applies there as well. I have one standard insert for .223 and one for .308. With the insert horizontal a quick push of the button allow you to swith between the inserts. It makes more sense when using it for the same caliber with different powder amounts for a different load. The pistol rotor and insert are easier to dial in for the lighter pistol loads, but you then have to change out the pistol rotor for the standard rotor. The standard insert will do 4.4 grains of Titegroup consistently, but I prefer the pistol rotor for light charges.
     
  11. GRUNDEL

    GRUNDEL Washougal Area Active Member

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    I am in no way the “Load Master” with my Hornady LnL AP and reload primarily .45 ACP & .40 S&W. I have had consistent results metering Bullseye and Clays as low as 3.5 grains with the pistol rotor installed. I also use the 10 round averages during setup and spot check every 100 rounds just to cover my arse. I may get a variance of +/- .1 grain with these powders but that is the max I have seen once I’m setup and rolling.