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Possible new hunting opportunity for the Northwest.


barrel-owl~2.jpg
 
More like a 'varmint' shooting opportunity than 'hunting' - I mean there ain't much you can do with a dead owl.

However I have a different opinion about this, and part of it may be due to my 'ignorance' of the environment and the animals that are part of it. From the article:

They are also larger and more territorial than the native owls, meaning that they displace the northern spotted owls, disrupting their nesting, competing with them for food, and even attacking them when they come too close.

OK - I understand they are not 'native' and the concept of being 'invasive' but wouldn't it be an example of 'natural selection' if they were to outnumber other species and become dominant?

I mean, what is the problem if one owl species displaces another and becomes dominant? They are OWLS - what is the difference? Who is going to know or care - other than the environmentalists?

I don't see owls as something 'dangerous' to anything - people, game or farm raised animals, so what specifically is the issue if this species replaces another?
 
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More like a 'varmint' shooting opportunity than 'hunting' - I mean there ain't much you can do with a dead owl.

However I have a different opinion about this, and part of it may be due to my 'ignorance' of the environment and the animals that are part of it. From the article:

They are also larger and more territorial than the native owls, meaning that they displace the northern spotted owls, disrupting their nesting, competing with them for food, and even attacking them when they come too close.

OK - I understand they are not 'native' and the concept of being 'invasive' but wouldn't it be an example of 'natural selection' if they were to outnumber other species and become dominant?

I mean, what is the problem if one owl species displaces another and becomes dominant? I mean they are OWLS - what is the difference? Who is going to know or care - other than the environmentalists?

I don't see owls as something 'dangerous' to anything - people, game or farm raised animals, so what specifically is the issue if this species replaces another?
I'm with you. Every time man interferes with mother nature and natural selection it never seems to end well. If they pose no credible threat to mankind, are not clearly destructive to the ecosystem... and not a food source... it's seems to just be senseless killing to preserve what exactly??

I do have an issue with man causing the artificial extinction of a species, but FAFO'ing with Mother Nature... I won't be a party to that.
 
I have no problem supporting Fish and Game agencies using hunters to control invasive species. Thats how it should work.
Cant say Im all that interested in hunting owls though. Maybe they taste like chicken... lol.
 
So we're supposed to hunt nocturnal birds but we're not allowed to hunt at night?
we can hunt coons and possums at night, no reason they couldnt make an exception for culling invasive species.
Ive seen them occasionally in the daytime though, not truly nocturnal.
 
OK - I understand they are not 'native' and the concept of being 'invasive' but wouldn't it be an example of 'natural selection' if they were to outnumber other species and become dominant?

I mean, what is the problem if one owl species displaces another and becomes dominant?
my guess is it depends on where the native species is in the local food chain. Species go extinct naturally, but unnaturally probably has more immediate negative consequences for other native species.

I can say that it would be anything but "natural selection" letting an invasive species eradicate a native species.
 
In 25yrs of hunting, I've seen a total of maybe 3 owls in the woods… all barred, sitting on a branch, minding their own feckin business. Who TF cares which owl we have? They serve a very good purpose keeping rodent and snake populations down. I sure as heck ain't gonna eat one, which makes the only impetus for killing one a BOUNTY, not a permit tag. Money seems to be going the wrong way here.
 
Loggers and Sawmill Workers rejoice! It wasn't you responsible for the decline of the Spotted Owl!

Now your government will begin the task of rebuilding the mills, towns, jobs and families that were destroyed.
 
Loggers and Sawmill Workers rejoice! It wasn't you responsible for the decline of the Spotted Owl!

Now your government will begin the task of rebuilding the mills, towns, jobs and families that were destroyed.
Dad was a forester that was up to date with the "studies" of the Spotted Owl and was pretty disgusted with the outcome that stated old growth forests were the only home for the Spotted Owl. He said. "It may be the preferred home, but they didn't even look for the bird in any other place."

However, a few years ago I was attacked by an owl while sitting in a treestand, waiting for sunrise. It hit me in the side of the head. Later it came swooping for another round. At that time I considered "hunting" owls...

owl attack.jpg
 
When out hunting it is fairly common to see Barred owls out , even during daylight hours.
At night when in camp they are very vocal.

I also agree with post #2...where is the consistency here ...?
In any event...If an invasive species were to be opened up for hunting....
How 'bout the Eastern Fox squirrel...they are all over the place here...and at least you can eat 'em...unlike owls...:D

Mucking around with nature and how she wants to do things...
Ain't the best of ideas....ain't y'all watched any science fiction or disaster movies...:D
Andy
 
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When out hunting it is fairly common to see Barred owls out , even during daylight hours.
At night when in camp they are very vocal.

I also agree with post #2...where is the consistency here ...?
In any event...If an invasive species were to be opened up for hunting....
How 'bout the Eastern Fox squirrel...they are all place here...and at least you can eat 'em...unlike owls...:D

Mucking around with nature and how she wants to do things...
Ain't the best of ideas....ain't y'all watched any science fiction or disaster movies...:D
Andy
Those squirrels didn't invade by themselves. They were transplanted in city parks and courthouse squares way back when because they are entertaining to watch. They are much larger and are taking the territory away from our native, and much smaller Douglas Squirrels.
In Oregon the Eastern Fox squirrel is considered an invasive species and can be hunted without limits.
 
Oregon's strategy for "invasive species" is no less inconsistent:

Pheasants, Chukars and Hungarian Partridge are "invasive species", but protected and managed as a resource. How many Sharptails and Sage Hens do they "displace"?

ODFW is staunchly against "high-fence" hunting (rightly so), but hypocritical: Elk tags are sold for such a hunt in Starkey Experimental Forest.

ODFW had to search nationwide in order to find a photograph of a feral pig, claiming all along (with pages in the Regs devoted) that they were "invading" the state. Wisconsin was happy to supply a picture of a wild pig for Oregon to use in their camouflaged (later vindictive) effort to shut down a private hunting preserve.
 
In Oregon the Eastern Fox squirrel is considered an invasive species and can be hunted without limits.
And... at least that isn't just senseless killing of animals. They eat really well and the hides can be sold/traded. Not at all times of the year or for much, but at least the don't go to waste... with just a bit of effort.
 

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