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Pants...

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by The Heretic, Nov 27, 2015.

  1. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I mostly wear jeans day to day. I have an office job and jeans are accepted there (t-shirts are not).

    But blue jeans are not good survival wear.

    First, this time of year they will get wet and cold - being made from cotton. Second, they are too lightweight for moving through brush, especially brambles which are common in the western sides of Oregon and Washington - the bramble thorns poke right through most common casual weight jeans. They also tear easily. If I had to walk home from work in these, and had to detour through any brush, I would at least be pretty miserable, regardless of the season, especially late fall, winter into early spring.

    A goretex or other synthetic "waterproof" covering is okay, except that most of the lightweight outer gear doesn't hold up for very long in brush - probably long enough to get home, but going through brambles it will get caught and torn up. Once home it won't last long for working around the property in the woods - generally that is not what it is made for.

    Patagonia and Arc'teryx make some heavy duty outerwear, but both are pretty expensive, especially for everyday workwear at the BOL.

    Carhartt and Dickies makes some okay workwear (I have some of both), but I have found something better; Riggs ripstop cargo pants made by Wrangler. I was in Bimart this summer and they had them on sale for $28 per pair. They were heavier cloth than the Carhartt and Dickies and they were ripstop and available in loden green (a darker version of OD green that I like). They have some variations of them - a Ranger and Carpenter pants - which have slightly different pockets but are similar, use the same 10oz. ripstop material, are cargo pants and have the double layer knees.

    The pants are similar to military cargo pants, but in some ways better. The cargo pockets don't bulge out and catch on brush like some military pants. There are reinforcements are various places on the pockets. No noisy velcro. Seem to be heavier weight material than most BDUs. I used them this summer for brush clearing and I was happy that the brambles didn't poke through them. Also, you can get them flannel lined.

    The downside - pure cotton, so once wet they will not dry quickly.

    I am going to probably take one pair and do the "tin cloth" treatment on them; a mixture of turpentine, beeswax and linseed oil. The main downside is that the pants will become rather flammable, so I will have to be careful when burning brush or sitting near the woodstove to not wear them. Otherwise I think this may make them near indestructible and waterproof. If one pair works, then I think I will get the flannel lined pair and do those too, making those my winter work pants. If that works I will do the same thing to my Carhartt insulated bibs.

    I have a Filson Tin Cloth cruiser hat and I like it - although with its wool lining it is too hot to wear 99% of the time on this side of the Cascades, especially if you are doing any work or exercise - without the lining it would probably be okay.

    I wish there was a better way to waterproof the pants, but from my research the spray on or wash-in treatments just don't work.

    I know some people like wool pants, but because of my Aspergers I can't tolerate them against my skin, and most are too heavy. When I was in college I had some heavy German Army wool pants with cargo pockets and the plastic lining in the knees and butt, and they worked well, but were way too heavy and irritating.
     
    GOG likes this.
  2. Joe13

    Joe13 NW of Vancouver Opinionated & Blunt Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    I've looked at some of the 5.11 gear and other tactical/non tactical pants looking for a lightweight tough pair of pants.

    Let me know how those work.
     
  3. Certaindeaf

    Certaindeaf SE Portland Well-Known Member

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    I've got a few old but brand new pairs of Brigade Quartermaster pants left.. I wear them all the time. Made in the USA. If you cut the blousing strings off they actually look pretty snazzy on ya. I like the cut.
    All around good kit for regular duty. 50/50 poly/cotton.
     
    Sgt Nambu likes this.
  4. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    So far they work well. A little stiff and heavy even after use and washing, but that is expected due to the heavier fabric and the extra material (especially the knees).

    The fit is loose and between that and the weight, I need to wear suspenders with them when working outside (a side effect of having a little bit of belly above my waist) as a belt just isn't enough.

    That said, they aren't onerous when it is hot - with the loose fit I don't get too hot in them - they are actually as good as regular jeans in that regard - but your fit may vary of course.

    As I mentioned, I really like the fact that they seem to not allow the thorns of brambles through them - when mowing through the brush this is a big issue for me - I need to find a long sleeve shirt that is as good as these pants in keeping the thorns from puncturing my flesh without making it too hot to wear.

    I like the pants, even if the "tin cloth" treatment experiment doesn't work - I think it will, but it will make them much heavier.

    I do wish the pants had tabs for button suspenders. I wonder if I could find a seamstress that would mod them?
     
  5. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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  6. Velzey

    Velzey Estacada, Oregon Gunsmith Gunsmith Bronze Vendor Bronze Supporter

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    If I wore pants I would buy those! $21 seems like a great deal!
     
  7. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Found that http://workingperson.com/ had these Riggs pants, including flannel lined ones, on sale this week, order one pair of each and some other stuff too.
     
  8. Brutus57

    Brutus57 Skagit County Well-Known Member

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    I have a couple of pair of Riggs, I like them. One pair is in my BOB.

    Brutus Out
     
  9. Brutus57

    Brutus57 Skagit County Well-Known Member

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    There are cheap little kits ($8.00 or so) for putting suspender buttons on pants. I did it on my leather pants I ride on my motorcycle. If you can turn a safety selector to Fire you can put the brass suspender buttons on any pair of pants.

    Brutus Out
     
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  10. No_Regerts

    No_Regerts United States Well-Known Member

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    Most pants will get wet and stay wet. Thats why its a good idea to wear under layers that can stay warm when wet. Good boots and gaiters keep my feet from getting wet and cold, which is my quickest path to misery.
     
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  11. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Normally I would wear some kind of rain gear outside my pants (and I do wear synthetic underneath it).

    However, most rain gear doesn't last too long in extreme survival situations - a few days to weeks of walking through brambles and scrambling over or through brush instead of staying on a trail, or other very rough treatment, and most synthetic rain gear will start coming apart.

    I am not saying don't use it - have that gear and I use it when necessary. But I also work in the woods on my property and I am not going to be out in that expensive and relatively fragile rain gear when I am cutting wood, scrambling over logs, dragging chokers around that have frayed cables, and other work like that in that rain gear. I also seen what happens to PVC rain gear in the woods too - it lasts a little longer, but it gets shredded eventually.

    It isn't always raining up here on the mountain, right now it is beautiful and sunny, but after November it is always wet until well into Spring. So I want something durable to be working in the woods. These pants so far are durable. I think with some homemade "tin cloth" treatment they will be more durable and they will be at least water resistant.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2015
    No_Regerts likes this.
  12. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Notice the pants this guy is wearing and what he is doing, and how a synthetic layer of rain gear on top would not last long doing things like ths:

     
  13. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    I want one or 2 of those come a longs.
    He is wearing an old well worn pair of Filson tin pants.Best rain gear for stuff like logging but they do take some time to break in.
    http://www.filson.com/men/pants/oil-finish-single-tin-pants.html
     
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  14. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    The Power Pull come alongs are expensive, but worth it if you need one. For the same price you could get an inexpensive powered winch. OTOH, the come along with rope would work in more situations, it just would be slower.

    I want to get one of those Lewis winches for my chain saw. That and an auger.
     
  15. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    A lot of 4X4 guys are using that rope instead of cable.I don't see why a guy couldn't replace it on any come a long. And in the 'you get what you paid for' category,I have 2 Harbor Frieght come a longs taht always leave me wondering why I still have them. Sometimes they seem to work perfect and others they seem to fly across the yard:eek:
    These look worth the money if you don't have power for a winch. If you are using a trailer,behind a truck,then you have power. And then the ATV/UTV winches make more sense
    OK,where's the link? Whatchutalkinaboutwillis?
     
  16. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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  17. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    Na,too much work for the saw unless you have a very big saw.Just because the saw will drag a huge log in doesn't mean you should.
    Kinda like putting a longer blade on your saw.You are working the saw more than it was intended to be and it will wear the saw down quicker
    JMO
    YMMV
     
  18. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    I have a Stihl MS461 which is a fair sized saw - I actually need to get a smaller saw too.

    For the price of the Lewis winch ($900) you can get a decent truck winch that has more capacity. But if you need a winch in an area where you can't get a truck, then this or a capstan winch or a come along are pretty much your choices.

    The advantage of the capstan winch is that you can pull long distances and you are not limited by how much rope you can get on the reel.



    All that said, I think a winch on each of my trucks would be fine for what I do.
     
  19. mjbskwim

    mjbskwim Salmon,Idaho Well-Known Member

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    WEll there is blocks and tackle to run the cable thru and that will up your pulling power.
    As far as a winch on each vehicle,why not get 1 of those trailer hitch mounts so you can use 1 winch for both?Then you put a trailer hitch on each end of the trucks
     
  20. The Heretic

    The Heretic Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Because one truck is 4 tons bare and will be 6 tons with a camper. I want a 16K# winch for that truck. I've gotten it stuck before and it is a bear to get unstuck.

    The other one - a Toyota - weighs about 3500#. I am thinking and 8K hitch winch would be good for that one - I would put a hitch on the front.

    I talked to a winch place about hitch winches and they said that the winches with the hitch kits won't go above a certain amount (4 to 5 ton) because they winch manufacturers don't want the larger winches used with the hitches due to liability and reliability reasons - they think the pins holding the hitch in place would shear, and they are probably right.
     
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