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NRA supports the use of Point Shooting for self defense.

Discussion in 'Education & Training' started by 5shot, Aug 12, 2009.

  1. 5shot

    5shot Mill Creek, WA New Member

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    Here is a link to an article that is based on the NRA Guide To The Basics Of Personal Protection In The Home.

    http://www.pointshooting.com/nra.htm

    Here is a link to it as a pdf file. http://www.pointshooting.com/nra.pdf

    I contacted the NRA and was told that their guide on the basics of personal protection outside the home, carries the same Point Shooting info.
     
  2. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    Its about time...seems they are a bit behind the times eh?
     
  3. pdxjohann

    pdxjohann Portland near Tigard Member

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    Forget that! Looks like a horse bite would really hurt.
     
  4. elkfish

    elkfish NW Oregon Member

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    That is a great link. Point shooting is the best choice for CW holder shooting technique. Combat accuracy is what it is about. I think sometimes we loose focus of what the real world is like and what likely will be our reaction. See target and hit target. Though I try an practice a modified point shooting drill that involves two or three quick combat hits followed by one or two the the head "aimed". I don't carry it a lot lately but I have a 3inch barrel mdl 85 that I like to this drill with.

    elkfish.
    :)
     
  5. Kanewpadle

    Kanewpadle Washington Member

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    There is a time and place for point shooting. Point shooting is not a one size fits all choice. Knowing where, when, and how is the key.
     
  6. wichaka

    wichaka Wa State Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, very good post. As I've posted before;

    Speed and accuracy work together, which is to get hit(s) as soon as possible.
    Pressing the trigger at the speed needed to control the sights to hit your target is what it's all about.

    If the threat is in anyway difficult to hit, you will need to slow down on the trigger and focus more on sight alignment.
    If the threat is close and easy to hit, then…..this is no time for a bullseye type group, in fact, you need to be pounding shots into the threat as fast as possible and stop the threat NOW!

    Most of the time you will be somewhere between the two above examples.

    Your decision on how fast vs. how slow to press the trigger, how much front sight vs. combat look through and/or body index is based on two things, your perception of the threat situation AND your perception of your skill with your equipment.

    For 95% of encounters you may be up against, it will be close up and personal. Just think of how close you stand from someone when you meet on the street, while in a car, or answering your door. These are just a few examples of why you should practice point shooting, as you won't have time to find that perfect sight picture...you need to get ta shootin'!

    Most everyone I've spoken with who have been in close range shootings don't remember using the sights. There's a very good well kept secret about point shooting...there is no method! Once your body is focused on the threat, and your eyes are locked on to the target, your shots will go where you are looking.

    One needs to practice contact distance out to where one thinks they can still be accurate and still have some speed doing it. This is where "your perception of your skill with your equipment."comes in.

    Most everything can be practiced without firing a round. Then you must discipline yourself to keep from blasting away when you go shooting with friends. Every shot is now looked at as practice and another repetition, so that when the time does come where you need to use your skills, you can focus on the threat at hand not what's going on behind the sights.
     
  7. Kanewpadle

    Kanewpadle Washington Member

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    Agreed. Most people whether they realize it or not will instinctively point shoot at close range. That's why it's important to practice the draw stroke as well as dry fire and live fire. Too many don't.
     
  8. Gunner3456

    Gunner3456 Salem Well-Known Member

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    When I was in my early 20's I wore out a CO2 powered BB pistol just walking in the woods and shooting offhand, no sights. Whatever was there, I shot at it - leafs on the ground mostly. If I missed I could see where the BB hit and shoot again until I zeroed in on the target.

    I got to where I could hit just about anything within the range of that gun that way.

    That's been a long time. I'm sure I've lost much of that skill. I should do that again.
     
  9. theLEMband

    theLEMband Southeast WA Member

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    If you look at the pictures of the grip on pointshooting.com he points the string hand index finger along the barrel and uses either the middle finger or weak hand index finger for trigger pulls. I tried this grip and it feels a bit odd. It may get better with time, but found no immediate better results from his method and using a normal grip. Also, the beavertail on my pistol aligns my index finger with the trigger. To lay it along the frame above the trigger, it has to point up relative to the barrel.
    I don't know, perhaps he's trying to sell his patented point and shoot accessory.