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Dr Prepper

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yeah true that. there Def should be.
maybe even pinned stages of reloading such as a pre amble or shopping list and things to consider while shopping.
and then different levels once you actually have your gear and have read the manuals for the basics of reloading. all the way into advanced reloading for ELR comp.
 

JuglansRegia

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Back when l started reloading in 1993, the internet wasn't a thing so l purchased a Speer reloading manual from Big 5 (because there was no internet) and l read the information section at least twice and made sure l understood the process before l bought anything else reloading related. It worked out well for me so I'd have to recommend the same process
 
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As for instructional material, ABC of Reloading is a good starter. Accurate/Western Powder handbook (in resources pinned above) has a good intro into reloading and its free.

As for equipment, it would depend upon how serious you're going to be into this hobby. Lee Precision stuff is okay for the occasional reloader but you'll probably want to upgrade if you decide to get serious. Their single stage presses are good solid equipment and their dies are also. But I would suggest going up a notch in other pieces like Lyman, Hornady, etc.
 

Dr Prepper

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I buy pretty much all lee stuff for cheaper pistol stuff where tolerances dont make as big of a difference over what 50yrds max typically?
I did spend more and got Redding dies for 10mm because it is my main pistol caliber.
I have cheaper dies for rifle too (like my 54r) but when it really matters like 6.5 grendel and Creemsmoor i buy top notch. Would like to get a 21st century (XXI) runout gage soon. I have a fairly nice ghetto one i made. But id like a dedicated one.
Remember. The bullets and powder are the primary cost in ammo and reloading. Not barrels or gun parts. The equipment can add up. (Really fast infact) but hitting what im aiming at the first time saves me money is how i look at it.

And the longer you can take to collect all your gear the more money you will save. I was collecting gear for about ten years before i sized my first shell.
 
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RVTECH

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Back when l started reloading in 1993, the internet wasn't a thing so l purchased a Speer reloading manual from Big 5 (because there was no internet)
Same with me but a 'few' years earlier.

Bottom line is the internet is NOT a replacement for books & manuals.

There are some very good, informative videos but but unfortunately many are made by LewBob and Cleetus and aren't really INSTRUCTIONAL but are more or less them showing what THEY are doing and how THEY do it which is not a good way to learn.

Start by studying a manual or book (or three) get the basics down and then if you want look for some good, INSTRUCTIONAL videos to 'compare notes' with what you have learned.

Another thing with regard to equipment - good, quality, equipment with the proven basics will take you a LOT farther than a massive pile of things you may never need (or not right away anyway). I sometimes get a laugh when I see massive amounts of reloading equipment up for sale, some never used, and I look at what the person is selling and a lot of it was hardly necessary (for a beginner) or if ever needed.

I have been loading for over 40 years and my setup is still relatively simple and basic but is very effective and loads all I need!
 
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Most of the reloading handbooks have great info on equipment and loads. But most have one flaw or another. They usually point you towards their products, so maybe leave out some bullets, or equipment that might help a lot. I have every loading manual made by most reloading tool companies, or bullet makers. I like my Hornady, but my old Hornady is nothing but jacketed dta for Hornady bullets. They will work with other's jacketed bullets, but not for cast loads.
RCBS, Hornady, Lyman, all point you towards their equipment, which is good stuff, but so are others. I've found my Hodgdon manual to be one of my favorites. It covers all sorts of bullets, plus numerous powders, and doesn't tend to push you in any direction. But I also use old pre-post WWII era Ideal manuals for reloading data on older cartridges I load, and cast bullet data.

I would agree with those who suggest you find someone who reloads to guide you as you get started. I'd also suggest you don't buy any equipment until you get a loading manual, and spend time watching someone reload. And finally NEVER start with a progressive, or fully automated reloading press! Start with a single stage press, and learn it well. Then maybe if you get into lots of reloading you might consider a faster progressive press.
Kits are a good way to start like the RCBS starter kit that gives you all the various tools needed to begin loading. But even low priced starter kits can cost you more than good used equipment. So don't overlook buying used as these quality equipment don't wear out, and can save you money buying them used. Gun shows, and classifieds here can result in saving 50% off the purchase if you're patient.
 

zenmariner

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First find a basic reloading class and take that.

Going against the grain do not buy the kit. Kits are filled with stuff u don’t really need. Figure out what u do need and go that route and source what u need as u go. That being said if u are just reloading pistol go progressive. Get the dies u need and for pistol get the nitride no lube required. Get a separate crimper for each caliber. If u dont care about shiny pistol brass skip the cleaner. Dont really need to have spotless brass.

you will figure out a lot of what is good and what is needed in the class. Do that first. $3000 dollars later and still in the rabbit hole....... most of all have fun and be safe
 
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Mikej

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So I just acquired some small pistol primers and want to get into reloading some 9mm and 40sw. Can someone point me to any guides and a list of equipment to get started.

A book detailing the process. And once you get your equipment amassed have a second book. Recipes vary in different publications
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A book will come with a kit. Reloading kits are scarce and expensive. This is a pee poor time to try to get into the hobby/habit.

Having a mechanical aptitude is a big plus when getting into hand loading. That means if you know how to use calipers, perhaps can replace brake pads/shoes and your car, able to remove the carb from you lawn mower and clean it out in spring when you need to do the first mowing, etc, I'd say you were a good candidate.

Starting with a single stage is generally accepted by the majority. In other words, don't go and buy a Dillon 550-750 until you're in tune with what reloading is all about.

Gosh these have gone up in price...

Lee also has kits. I would say re: Lee, do not get their little cheep press.

The advice above regarding watching the classifieds here is correct. Ebay could be a decent resource.

#1: Start with a CURRENT book. As you read you can look for what you need.
 

RVTECH

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What stuff didn't I really need? Enlighten me please! I can't really think of what I didn't use out of my Rockchucker kit?
Same here.

ALL my original RC kit 'stuff' got - and still gets used.

I suspect some believe kit 'stuff' is impractical, outdated etc. but that is hardly the case.

All practical and useful 'stuff' in the RC kit!

RC.jpeg
 
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Mikej

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Same here.

ALL my original RC kit 'stuff' got - and still gets used.
I was given an electric "Prep-Center as a gift from family some years ago. But I wasn't ever going to load rifle rounds, never! Sold it never plugged in! What a maroon! I would say to a noob, don't buy a prep-center now, because you can do all that with simple hand tools.
 
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Lasers

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Agreed with the posts above.

Start with your hands and buy the inexpensive tools. I started with just a Rock Chucker and a tumbler, now....

Rock chucker
3 tumblers
Case trimmer (with recently purchased power drill adapter)
Powder thrower
RCBS electronic powder dispenser (huge time saver)
RCBS primer pocket swager (stand alone unit)
Forrester trimmer with power adapter
Case gauges (go-no go)

The "last" thing I need is a prep center, to speed up the post trim work...

After that I think the only next step is going with a big blue machine that costs more than I can stomach lol
 
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Hit up Harbor freight for your calipers, tweezers, ultrasonic cleaner, and other small pieces of your setup. Member marcusp on both this forum and waguns often sells presses and accessories including dies, powder and other reloading consumables. Many of us have given Marc a lot of money in recent years.
Sages Reloading Supply in WA has great prices on brass, I recommend him highly!
 

WTC

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Bad time to start in, everything unavailable online.

You would be best starting with a kit that has most things you need. Press, powder drop, scale, primer, reloading manual etc. I prefer midsouth shooters supply, cabelas, optics planet, midway all carry stuff. Starting out I would go single stage or simple turret.

Likely you would need to buy a brass cleaner and caliper seperately.

Or just look in our classified for a complete set up.

Examples
X2 on the lock and load. I have the rcbs Rockchucker and had to buy the adapter and bushings kit to convert it to what the hornady kit has factory. Being able to switch dies without adjustment is boss.

I have a lee 4 hole now too that I'm setting up. Got a crazy deal on it so I'm going progressive faster than I intended. Still a bit scared if it tbh.....
 
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Everybody has their own way of reloading based upon their past experiences. But they also have confidence in their equipment. As an occasional reloader, I have confidence in my equipment and dropped the rest; originally from a Lee kit (just kept the press and hand primer)

Yes, the other pieces do work and I still have them but I have more confidence from other manufacturers.. Take for example my Lyman powder measure. Its all metal construction (except for tube) and is beefier, more robust than my Lee Breechlock press.
 

ma96782

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You can go ultra cheap = Lee Loader
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Kits are also available for some of the more popular rifle cartridges.

Economy Starter = single stage press. If you're on a tight budget.....may I suggest, Red = Lee.
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Note that there are many ways to accomplish a task (trimming, priming, weighing charges, dropping powder, etc..).

If you buy the carbide die set you don't need to lube your straight-walled cartridge brass. But know that rifle brass (bottlenecked cartridges) will get stuck w/o lube. And a carbide die set is NOT usually available for bottlenecked cartridges.

Expensive = progressive press
BUT.....as I like to say......learn to crawl or walk before you start to run and/or drive. Some might tell you that it's not hard to just jump into a progressive press. Whatever.

Then normally.....reloading pistol rounds is easier and cheaper vs. rifle rounds. And so.....among the handgun rounds.....the simplest/easiest to learn is probably the rimmed cartridge (like: .38 special/.357 mag or .44 special/.44 mag)

Go and look on YouTube, read some books (buy a reloading manual) and/or find a mentor.

IMHO.......check your local gun show for "bargains" on reloading equipment and/or components (though nowadays you'll probably have to look harder to find a "deal"). That doesn't mean that the local gunshop won't have what you're looking for. You just may need to search for it a little harder.

Aloha, Mark

PS.....If you have a more generous budget, may I suggest, Green = RCBS. They make some good presses and even though I have mostly moved to progressive presses. There is always a job for the old Rock Chucker.
 
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Found a pound of hp38 and made 110 empty cases today. Last component needed are bullets. Then to finally gathering equipment needed. And thanks to 2ndtimer for putting me on Johnny's reloading bench on YouTube. Just finished his 2nd video on 9mm reloading. Super informative
 
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