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Manhattan DA Fires Back After Apple CEO Defends Stance On App Encryption

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Joe Link, Dec 21, 2015.

  1. Joe Link

    Joe Link Portland, OR Well-Known Member Staff Member Lifetime Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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  2. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    If the GOV doesn't get its way to secretly spy on us un-knowing Americans it will pass backdoor legislation to get it. They are above the law!!!!
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2015
    Stomper, Bazooka Joe and oknow like this.
  3. tunus

    tunus PDX, United States Active Member

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    I feel exactly opposite to this. With Apple, you agree to their TOS as soon as you turn on your phone for a first time and from that point on, you have very little control over what information your apps are accessing on your phone. With Google, you also agree with their TOS, but you have complete control over what information the apps can access. For example, I downloaded some photo editing app and it asked for permission to access my contacts and messages. I can't envision any scenario where a photo editing app will need my contacts, so I denied its access request.

    I have also turned off all services that upload my personal information to google for the sake of improving my experience. I don't want google to back up my media, remember where I've been or sync my accounts and passwords across devices. I also go a step further and encrypt my media just in case I lose my phone.

    I am not a huge fan of google either, but at least I have more control over what personal information is leaked through apps and services. That doesn't seem to be the case with Apple.
     
  4. bolus

    bolus Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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  5. Caveman Jim

    Caveman Jim West of Oly Springer Slayer 2016 Volunteer

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    Last edited: Dec 21, 2015
  6. slimer13

    slimer13 Deer Park Well-Known Member

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    I actually watched the Tim Cook interview last night on 60 min and he said that when the government gets a warrant, Apple turns over everything they have but the gov is pissed because not even Apple can bypass the encryption on these apps.

    I don't know though, I assume everything I ever type or read is ran through NSA.
     
  7. bolus

    bolus Portland Gold Supporter Gold Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer

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    Snowden and other whistle blowers have said that there really isnt any encryption that the NSA cant break. So yes, assume all you email and web use is recorded. But as San Bernandino showed, you can go on facebook and announce you are a terrorist and it does not really matter.
     
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  8. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke Eugene Silver Supporter Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    You're smart, Joe. Apple's systems are designed to be secure. Apple does not make money mining your data. They don't want to. Mining your data and selling information about you and your habits to advertisers is Google's primary way of making money. That's how they can afford to give their services and products away. There is no comparison between Apple and Google for security. Google's operating systems are "open", meaning you are free to hack their products as you see fit. It also means all the bad guys can hack their products too.

    Here's an example:

    Apple Pay uses near field technology to make payments at checkout terminals in stores. You authorize payment when your phone recognizes your fingerprint. That makes it very difficult for someone who steals your phone to make fraudulent purchases. The transaction data does not include any of your personal information, or your ATM/Credit card information. It is sent encrypted and you are identified by a one-time code that's generated. The bank is the only entity that can decode the data because they have a security token that matches your phone. If the data was intercepted the code would be worthless since it is only good for that transaction. The merchant does not receive any identifying information about who bought the items, so their loyalty card programs don't work with Apple Pay.

    Google wallet is used in the same way at the terminal, but the transaction is processed exactly as if you had swiped an ATM/credit card, passing your personal and card information to the merchant and to the bank. If the data is intercepted or the phone is lost you're in a world of hurt.

    I'm sensitive to this because I've been a victim of data breaches like Home Depot and Target had. I use Apple Pay wherever possible, so that if a merchant's system is breached again my data will not be in the merchant's system.
     
  9. Dyjital

    Dyjital Albany, Ore Flavorite Member Bronze Supporter

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    I encrypt my phone and I encrypt the backups saved on my computer. Without my thumbprint they aren't going anywhere....
     
    ZigZagZeke likes this.