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laquer coated ammo

Discussion in 'General Firearm Discussion' started by txchl33, Jul 24, 2010.

  1. txchl33

    txchl33 Killeen, TX New Member

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    I purchased some .223 "JSC {The TULA Cartridge Works}" from Cabelas in Buda, TX.
    It's in a white box. Can Anyone tell me if it is laquer coated?
    DelTon says if I fire laquer coated ammo it will void my warranty.
    Any help greatly appreciated.
    John
    325 370 6547
     
  2. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

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    It looks like Tula is polymer coated. Is this what you bought?
     
  3. txchl33

    txchl33 Killeen, TX New Member

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    That's the one. $4 a box.
     
  4. drew

    drew OR Well-Known Member

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    You should be fine. This stuff is polymer coated not lacquer coated.
     
  5. txchl33

    txchl33 Killeen, TX New Member

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    Thx Drew, have a good one.
     
  6. Bam

    Bam Portland Member

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    remember to give your chamber a good cleaning afterwards... steel cases don't expand like brass and let more junk into the chamber which can gunk things up and cause a FTE.
     
  7. jhc5

    jhc5 Seattle, WA Member

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    Can you do a quick list of the cons to using lacquered steel ammo in general? It seems to be one of the cheapest options for 9mm range/practice ammo, but I don't want to save a couple bucks at the expense of my guns.
     
  8. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

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    The main thing with laquered ammo is what it leaves behind when it heats up.

    Shooters report that when they dump a hundred or two rounds of ammo down their guns, it heats up the chamber (go figure).

    So, when you leave your weapon loaded an go down range to check your target, then return back to your new AR-15 you will find that those cheap laquered rounds have melted the laquer in your chamber. But by the time you get back behind your gun, it will cool down and the laquer will re-harden inside (sticking the bullet to the chamber).

    This can cause serious problems with your firearm. You can get a bullet stuck in your barrel or in your chamber when the laquer re-hardens.

    Knowing this, you can still shoot laquered rounds down your guns without incident. Just shoot a mag, let cool, shoot a mag and leave unloaded between targets and mags. Clean the gun THOROUGHLY when you are all done and you won't even notice the difference when you switch to match grade ammo to shoot that coyote.
     
  9. txchl33

    txchl33 Killeen, TX New Member

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    Polymer coated rounds don't leave a residue that will stop ejection of spent cartridge?
     
  10. Riot

    Riot Benton County, Washington Well-Known Member

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    The best answer I can give you is that it shouldn't. People haven't reported a problem with the polymer coated rounds like they have with the laquered ones.

    Your best bet is just to unload the firearm after you shoot a mag off and let the rifle take a break.


    This is a good practice to get into anyways to prevent a "cook off" -meaning the round going off in the chamber from the heat alone. Mind you, however, that you would have to expend HUNDREDS of rounds consecutively to achieve this effect.
     
  11. Phonelesscord

    Phonelesscord Portland, Oregon Member

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    Myths. You cannot melt the green coating off of these casings. get a stove, a torch, try it. The steel cases dont expand and the residue is very dirty. That is all.
     
  12. matt_w

    matt_w Hillsboro, OR Active Member

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    I've fired about 500 rounds of this stuff through my Del-Ton rifle (after laughing at their note about warranty voiding) without a single problem. It just makes cleaning the rifle afterwards a bit harder. Also, don't fire brass ammo after steel, or else it can jam like crazy.
     
  13. Abiqua

    Abiqua Oregon Active Member

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    You shouldn't be doing this anyway. They should be unloaded with the action open (if possible) before anyone crosses the firing line.
     
  14. Bam

    Bam Portland Member

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    People still have problems with the polymer cases... it isn't so much the lacquer or polymer "melting". Steel cases don't expand like brass cases allowing carbon to gunk up the chamber, eventually something will get stuck.

    Russian guns don't have this problem, because they aren't built to the exacting tight standards as other weapons.