hunting -- just starting out

Discussion in 'Northwest Hunting' started by saiga308, Jan 27, 2009.

  1. plumberfishes

    plumberfishes
    Gresham oregon
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    you think hitting a 4" target at 100 yards25% of the time is ok for a hunter? no, thats not really good enough, modern guns are almost all capable of 1" groups at 100 yards, and you should be able to hit a 4" target 100 % of the time at 100 yards there is no excuse for not being able to.
     
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  2. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke
    Eugene
    Curmudgeon Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    You forgot to include, "from a standing position". Yes, most non-competition shooters would say 25% is adequate, I think.
     
  3. plumberfishes

    plumberfishes
    Gresham oregon
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    Well its not, my father would have not allowed us to carry a gun with shooting like that. And now with modern weapons, and newer scopes, there is really no excuse for poor shooting. If you cannot afford to go to the range enough to be a decent shot and, 4" at 100 yard 90% of the time is "decent " in my book then you really do not need to be out hunting until you have more practice. But my main point is if you are not good enough with your weapon to make a clean ethical shot then you should not be hunting.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2015
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  4. ZigZagZeke

    ZigZagZeke
    Eugene
    Curmudgeon Silver Supporter 2015 Volunteer

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    Good thing nobody needs your permission to go hunting. There wouldn't be anybody out there. I used to shoot competition, and 80/100 standing is good enough to win a lot of matches. That's roughly what you're calling for here. The average hunter I see at public sight-ins is happy with 4" from the bench. My Howa .30-06 will shoot 3/4" at 100 yards from the bench. That doesn't mean I can do that standing. But I have killed 5 bucks over the last 7 years of hunting with offhand shots at from 70 to 100 yards and I hit every one of them where I intended.
     
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  5. rockstardrnkr

    rockstardrnkr
    Vancouver
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    OK so Im new to hunting, never been and have always wanted to. A guy at work has offered to go with me, he knows plenty of places. I think that if you can find someone who is willing to show you some techniques as well as spots it would be helpful. Also take up an interest in reading everything you can about what game you are hunting for. I plan on going predator hunting first so I bought myself the right kind of gun and scope, next is a license for Oregon and most likely a predator call when I get the cash.

    But one thing you are doing right is asking questions, my buddy from work loves talking about hunting and has given me alot of info to chew on.
     
  6. particleman

    particleman
    Kenmore, WA
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    This is first-class nonsense and you sound an awful lot like the average wanna-be hunter blowhard that I remember from hunter training class 20 years ago. Even being able to shoot off-hand at all isn't a requirement for ethical hunting. What's necessary for ethical hunting is to know the conditions and ranges at which you and your weapon can shoot accurately enough for a clean kill and then limiting your shots to those circumstances and ranges.

    My grandfather (and father) have "essential tremor" which is a physical dysfunction much like Parkinson's, but which degrades fine motor function and causes shaking when trying to use cups, silverware, etc. They don't take offhand shots. They also don't take long shots. I can't remember when either one took a shot over 100 yards, and I only know of one deer taken as far out as 75 yards. We set up in tree stands or we bring shooting sticks and other rests, or we find trees that have branches at convenient heights. So the assertion that they must be able to hit a 4" target at 100 yards 90% of the time offhand or are not qualified to be ethical hunters is just nonsense.

    If you're not capable of constructing a clean and cogent argument, you probably should not be posting. Ethical hunting has nothing to do with being able to win arbitrary accuracy competitions. It means shooting when you know you've got a clean kill. That's it. Stop with the other nonsense, you don't know what you're talking about.
     
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  7. BEN LILLY

    BEN LILLY
    Lincoln City, OR
    NRA LIFE MEMBER

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    Take a hunter safety course
    get a subscription to field and stream.
    go camping every chance you get.
    volunteer to help with a local scout troop.
    join a rod and gun club.
    hike with a backpack alot.
    get in shape.
    get a set of forest service and BLM MAPS. GET A HAND HELD GPS AND A COMPASS.


    Read every thing Gene Hill ever wrote. Hill country, A hunters
    Fire Side Book. And many others that he wrote.
     
  8. gjk86

    gjk86
    jefferson or
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    You dont really need a lot to start hunting. Start out blacktail hunting. Bring a scoped rifle and a knife and hunt on a logging companies property that allows hunting find some clearings to watch if you dont see anything make short runs through the clearing. Blacktail deer are very hard to see when they are not moving. Over the years as you get experience you can pick up more gear and start traveling further back into the woods. I would not reccomend elk hunting with out experience or without having someone with you that has experience its a whole different ball game going after elk
     
  9. Jonfarmer

    Jonfarmer
    Oregon
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    I am also just starting out. I tried myfirst attempt at turkey hunting for the fall season. Aiming to try again in the next couple weeks. Deer is next after I get proper rifle.
     
  10. Hydro dipper

    Hydro dipper
    Springfield va
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    Hello could you help me out with the forum thing. I'm new and do hydro dipping. I want to introduce myself but not sure how. Thanks
     
  11. python287

    python287
    Neskowin,OR
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    My first rule in hunting is we don't get into a vehicle with a chambered round in the rifle - Bolt is open - I don't load it until I get out of the vehicle - some with crossing fences - open the bolt - hand it to the person I am hunting with - always wear orange in the woods - always know where everyone else is located - when in doubt don't shoot - safety is always the # 1 rule. Have fun !
    :)
     
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  12. Trailboss

    Trailboss
    Vancouver, WA
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    I've taught dozens of folks to hunt over the years. Most often the experience was quite positive for me and the students. Only one student demonstrated a complete disrespect for the animal. While posting a bit away from me, he gut shot multiple deer that his tag wasn't good for. I had to put them down as they were suffering. I personally saw to it that he was charged for his actions and warned him that if I ever saw him in the woods again, the experience would be one he would never forget.

    For folks wanting to learn to hunt, there is probably one major barrier stopping experienced hunters from volunteering to teach new hunters. If I take the new hunters out to an easily accessible public place during a season, we will see lots of other hunters and no game. Not really a good experience and no experience shooting or cleaning. If I take a new hunter to one of my spots, then they will return with their friends to hunt that spot and it won't be my spot anymore. I hate loosing good spots to hunt.

    If a new hunter spends time to get permission to hunt a farm or ranch or private property, then an experienced hunter would gladly go along and teach the ropes. Otherwise, the cost is just too high for an experienced hunter to bare.
     
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  13. Ironbar

    Ironbar
    Tigard, OR
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    Amen to what Trailboss said. I used to hunt when I was younger in a great spot in the Willamette Unit. It got to the point where we just couldn't hunt there anymore due to development. I lost interest when I went to college, but years and years later when I got interested again, ODFW had put so many restrictions on hunting, and there just flat out weren't any places to go that anybody would tell you about because of the exact reason that TB described. Nobody wanted to give away their fav spot to hunt and I don't blame them. I still don't tell people where I do my outdoor target shooting because when I did I saw marked increase in trash left behind that I have to clean up!

    I would love to go deer hunting again someplace where there was actually a chance of bagging game, but I guess those days are over forever for me.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2014
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  14. concealedhunter

    concealedhunter
    Tualitan Valley
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    This was my first year seriously hunting in Oregon and the first thing I learned was to have a specific target. Whenever I went with a bunch of tags in my pocket and wanting to shoot whatever I saw I always came back empty handed. Even if I have five valid tags, I pick one animal to hunt and then am opportunistic with what comes along.
    Case in point, my first kill this year was a coyote that I got while stalking a black bear. I ranged the black bear at 300 yards and made the stalk, when I was within 100 yards and out of sight but not out of hearing, a coyote jumped out at me. My response was to hit it with the butt of my gun, and now I have a cool coyote skull hanging from my rearview mirror with the first vertebrae smashed to kingdom come. When I set up my Foxpro and just hope to see something, I dont even get coyote howl responses. My advice as a new hunter to another is to be specific with what you hunt for.
    My next tip would be to learn basic navigation/survival skills. I dont have a GPS but I always bring a compass. As long as the sun is shining I can do a pretty good job navigating with shadows and moss growth, but the compass is a must have for my go-bag. Aside from my skinning knife, I always bring utensils to construct a shelter and fire. This part I learned from growing up in a state forest in Alaska, and its one thing that I notice people from Oregon are pretty bad at, at least in general.
     
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  15. MikeIsh

    MikeIsh
    Portland
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    I agree with all of the suggestions of the Hunter's Safety Class. Yes it is required for younger hunters, but I learned a heck of a lot. I have yet to get out hunting, injuries, and other responsibilities. But still am planning to get out. Buying a hunting license is a lesson in it's self. You have to decide what you want. I fish, so I get a combination, then either buy draw points, or last year I bought a deer tag. I was busy and missed the season.

    Good luck
    My biggest issue with getting hunting is all my friends who hunt are all set with hunting buddies. I would be an outsider, and they have rituals & traditions that I am not in the know of.
     
  16. Joe13

    Joe13
    NW of Vancouver
    Opinionated & Blunt Silver Supporter Bronze Supporter 2015 Volunteer 2016 Volunteer 2017 Volunteer

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    Hunting has been the single hardest thing I have ever tried to "get in to" in my life.

    99% of that is because of people not wanting to share locations and their hard work scouting (all things I understand much better now).
     
  17. YoungBlood

    YoungBlood
    SW Washington
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    That is a hard thing to find, someone who is willing to grab a newbie and at least show them how to scout spots, what to look for,how to walk through the woods etc..
     
  18. plumberfishes

    plumberfishes
    Gresham oregon
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    so for 2 men who (are not capable of holding a weapon steady to shoot 100 yards due to a medical condition)
    and who therefore never take shots at over 100... my comment of the need to be able to hit better than 4" at one hundred is nonsense... if they cannot shoot 100 then they do not need to be able to... BUT !... for a person who is going to be hunting at 100 plus yards he or she should be capable of hitting a 4" bulls eye at more than 75% of the time... I never said they should be shooting at animals free hand , I said they should be able to shoot that well.... is this an opinion, yes , its mine, don't like it tough... but to call me names because your family doesn't shoot that far is rude and uncalled for. I am sorry that your family had that problem, it must suck.
    I will say I am myself not a great shot, I shoot with a scope I shoot off sticks, and I take my time.... but...
    I can hit a 4' clay pigeon hanging on a board at 100 yards with my scoped deer rifle standing , no rest well over 90% of the time .
    My point was practice practice practice if you shoot 3 shots once a year to make sure your rifle is on , and then go out and try a 250 yard shot off of a rest or 100 yards standing freehand do not expect to be hitting 90% and if your a great natural shot practice will only make you better.
    Doug
     
  19. Joe13

    Joe13
    NW of Vancouver
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    That's why I liked getting a .308, cuz there is lots of mil surp ammo out there cheap to practice with.

    So I plink with my hunting rifle once a month or two.
     
  20. jsparks747

    jsparks747
    Portland, Or
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    The age cutoff for the Hunter Education Course is 16.
     

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