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5 gallon bucket food storage contents?

Discussion in 'Preparedness & Survival' started by Father of four, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    My wife and I are starting to store up extra food in case of an emergency. We have purchased food grade buckets and lids. Our oxygen absorbers are on the way here. We have already purchased a fair amount of lentils, beans, rice, sugar, noodles..etc. My question is, how did some of you pack them away? Mixed amounts in 5 gallon buckets? Did you figure out an amount that you think your family would consume in 1 (5ga) bucket? Did you use smaller bags instead of the 20x30in Mylar bags per bucket? Like say 1 gallon bag filled with rice, 1 gallon bag filled with beans, 1 gallon bag filled with noodles, 1 gallon bag filled with lentils and say 1/2 gallon bag filled with powdered milk? Ideas anyone?
    Thanks, Howard
     
  2. g.i. joe

    g.i. joe Portland Active Member

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    Howard,
    My concept was to have a "grab and go" bucket system. In my mind, If all I have time to do is grab one bucket, I want it to sustain me for "x" number of days.
    How I packed my bucket: I used a vacuum seal system with custom length, 8" wide bags so that I have a 6 lb bag of beans, a 6 lb bag of rice a 6 lb bag of lentils, and a 3 lb bag of oats. These 4 bags fit vertically into the bucket.
    In addition to this I added: Small can of coffee. (coffee is good for the soul, good for trade, and the metal can could offer many uses including cooking the before mentioned dry goods. Matches, Chocolate (again good for the soul, or trade), small "shot size" vodka bottles (these fit into small areas in the bucket and offer antiseptic qualities, pain killer, again good for the soul, and trade value), 100 rds of .22 ammo, seasoning cubes for beans, 1 lb of salt (seasoning, wound care, oral care), tooth brush, cigarettes (Im not a smoker, but If there is something I need, A smoker will trade me anything for them), water purification tablets. There is room for improvement and customization on this, and I may have forgotten some of the items I have in there but that is the jist of it. I calculate this bucket will last one person 30 days. I think storing 5 gallons of particular items is a great idea, but how much time and space will you have when you bug out? If you only have room for one bucket, this might be the way to go.
    Also, If you are the charitable type, It would be good to have these on hand to give to someone in need as it has many necessities included.
    A more useful approach might be square buckets with square bags of goods stacked neatly inside, this would be a better use of space as with my system there was wasted space that I had to creatively fill with all the small goodies mentioned earlier.
    Hope that helped.
     
  3. Father of four

    Father of four Portland, Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Thank you g.i joe.
     
  4. TAT2D

    TAT2D Portland Member

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    I like the idea of storing non-perishables, but the enthusiasm is always tempered with memories of the moth-infestation we went through a couple years ago. Had oatmeal, dry cereal, noodles, all in original, sealed packaging in a garage cupboard.

    Saw a few moths, the little dusty-tan 1/4" long ones, in the garage (think they were centered on the steel garbage pail with the sack of sunflower birdseed,) but didn't think too much of it. Before long they were in the house, in the 2nd pantry, and were munching their way through everything with a grain component to it. About the only thing they *didn't* seem to be able to enter was sealed glass jars. It took two years to finally get the infestation back under control. Since then, I'm a little leery of getting too much stored up, least not without taking measures against pests.

    We also get mice and an occasional rat in the garage. They can chew through almost anything so I'm thinking a steel cabinet with latching doors may be in order for any food-stuffs stored there.

    MrB
     
  5. dave

    dave Independence Member

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  6. krazed

    krazed Yamhill Member

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    I know this wasn't your question but I thought this was good information and a great way to look at food storage.

    Episode-404- Food Storage for Better Living Today
    http://www.thesurvivalpodcast.com
     
  7. Decidion

    Decidion Washington county, Oregon Member

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    Yes, I have these and they work very well. We got ours from Emergency Essentials (beprepared.com)
     
  8. jimwsea

    jimwsea Vancouver, Washington state Active Member

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    +1
     
  9. dave

    dave Independence Member

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    They sound great. I have found them locally (tap plastic co) but $9.95 each.
    Its looking like on line with shipping is the best method for a dozen.
     
  10. NWOutdoors

    NWOutdoors South Hill Puyallup New Member

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    We have used mylar bags in the food grade buckets for several years now. It is the way to go if storing a single item in each bucket.
    We have also stored away several buckets with multiple "grab" bags inside. The 'food saver' vacuum system is heavily used at my house, and we have vacuum sealed easily useable bags then stored them in the buckets. The buckets can then be single or multi item containers.

    The food grade buckets are a terrific start but they are not air tight and the food needs the vacuum sealing or the mylar for further protection.


    If anyone would like a decent video about using mylar bags and sealing them here is a link :

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZkiU1fUtsE
     
  11. NWOutdoors

    NWOutdoors South Hill Puyallup New Member

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    We use the gamma lids on the buckets with 'grab bags' inside. If the bucket is filled with a single item within a mylar bag then we just use a gasketed lid. The extra price of the gamma lids isn't justified for a long term storage bucket IMHO.
     
  12. Decidion

    Decidion Washington county, Oregon Member

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    Agreed. The Gamma lids are for food that is in your current rotation... using it nearly everyday or so. For long term storage, the regular gasket lids are much cheaper.
     
  13. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Lower Yakima Valley Well-Known Member

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    You can also get ziploc mylar bags, now. They are more expensive than the ones you seal yourself, but you don't have to pay for the heat sealer.

    g.i. joe's ideas re mixed buckets are good, especially if you expect to have bug out. If you live at your retreat, then it isn't as useful, though you may have to bugout of your retreat, too. I have my commodity items in full 5gal mylar-lined buckets. I do live at my retreat, but if I had to bugout I have bugout bags and could grab some of the #10 cans of dehydrated foods that I also have if there was not time or room for the buckets.
     
  14. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    I am just getting ready with my LT storage system. I am planning it out now. Can anyone tell me how much weight of certain items they are able to get into each 5 gal?

    I am planning to store wheat, rice, various beans, sugar etc. I was hoping that a 50lb bag of most items would fit just fine but I am now doubting that's possible. I need to know how many buckets to have for the total weight I will be assembling.

    ANy info would be appreciated.
     
  15. Bazooka Joe

    Bazooka Joe Lower Yakima Valley Well-Known Member

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    About 25 pounds is a decent guess. Of course it varies by product. 50# of wheat was a little less than two buckets, but 50# of rolled oats was a little more than two. 25# of sugar was one bucket. Honey would probably be heavier per bucket.
     
  16. cyborg

    cyborg Oregon City Active Member

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    I just got a line on some 5.5gallon buckets with lids with rubber gaskets that held honey. A guy in Troutdale has 100 of them and I will be going to get 40 for myself on Sunday. He is selling what he says are NAMPAC and Plastican buckets. I sent him a pic of a ROPAK bucket with the rigid reinforcement rings around them ,which IMHO, are the nicest ones available, and he says his are just like this.

    So if they are as good as he says at $2 each they are a great deal. If anyone else would like some let me know.Maybe you can go with me or something.