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What does Hornady's Reloading Manaul have for .223 Remington 55 FMJBT?

Discussion in 'Ammunition & Reloading' started by zippygaloo, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. zippygaloo

    zippygaloo Oregon Member

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    Can someone tell me what Hornady's Reloading Manual says for their .223 Remington 55gr. FMJBT W/C? I'm specifically looking for data relating to Hodgdon H335 and Hodgdon CFE 223.

    Thanks.
     
  2. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    Have you checked the Hodgdon site yet? I've found their data to be right on the money for this bullet. Also, as they are a powder manufacturer, their data is more likely to be up to date with their current product characteristics.
     
    kburr64 and (deleted member) like this.
  3. speedtriple

    speedtriple Vancouver, Washington, United States Member

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    Hornady 8th Edition
    H 335
    #2267 55 GR BT-FMJ COL 2.200
    20.8 GR 2800 FPS
    21.6 GR 2900 FPS
    22.4 GR 3000 FPS
    23.2 GR 3100 FPS MAX LOAD

    HODGDON'S 2012 ANNUAL MANUAL
    NO DATA FOR HORNADY 55 GN
    SPEER SP 55 GN COL 2.200
    CFE223
    26.0 GN 3133 FPS
    27.8 GN 3329 FPS
    H335
    23.0 GN 3018 FPS
    25.3 GN 3203 FPS
     
  4. zippygaloo

    zippygaloo Oregon Member

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    This is what confuses me. The bullet manufacturer (Hornady) says Max Load is 23.2 gr for the 55 gr FMJBT while the powder manufacturer (Hodgdon) says Max Load is 25.3 gr and Start Load is 23 gr for a 55 gr SP.

    Hodgdon's Start load of 23 gr is practically Hornady's Max Load of 23.2 for the 55gr FMJBT.

    I'm not sure what to do here. Do I go with the bullet or the powder manufacturer's data? Some say a 55 gr bullet is a 55 gr bullet. Others say there are minor differences in design that need to be taken into consideration for load data.

    I have not found, nor heard, of any website or publication that provides load data for the Hornady 55 gr FMJBT. You basically have to buy Hornady's manual in order to get the information. I think they should provided it to the customer when they purchase the bullets.
     
  5. speedtriple

    speedtriple Vancouver, Washington, United States Member

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    Most of the data in manuals such as Hornady's and Hodgdon's are for bolt action guns. I would start conservative. I find best results on my 16" AR with 9 twist happens around one step below Hornady's Max, or even a little less.
     
  6. zippygaloo

    zippygaloo Oregon Member

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    What is "one step"? Also I have a 5.56mm chamber and 14.5" barrel, how should this affect my load choice?
     
  7. Mark W.

    Mark W. Silverton, OR Bronze Supporter Bronze Supporter

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    Welcome to the wonderful world of reloading.

    I can show you 6 completely different load recomendations using the same powder slug and primer for .30M1 You have to start near the bottom and work up. What ever you do do not go over the max recomended SOMEWHERE.
     
  8. speedtriple

    speedtriple Vancouver, Washington, United States Member

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    Hornady publishes in a table format. For a given powder, they will list in increments of usually 100 fps for rifles. Using my chronograph and group sizes, I often find the best overall performance falls near the powder amount they list for 100 fps below their recommended max load. I will take the data from the book, and load at least 3 different loads. Then using the chronograph, I will shoot groups and measure the velocity. Look for pressure signs. Check for proper cycling on a semi auto. Measure group sizes.

    There is not any magic way to know what the best load is for your gun. You have to do the work. A chronograph certainly is a big help. Learning to read pressure signs is something I am only starting to do at all well. I guess what I am saying is, hot loads are usually not needed. Your AR barrel will last longer, as well most of the other moving parts if you take it a bit easy on the loads. Generally a shorter barrel will give you less velocity. But the twist rate is usually faster in a AR .223 than a bolt gun, and that can raise pressures.

    There are many articles on the web about working up loads. There can be many more steps I did not address at all. I don't put that much into my AR loads. But for my .308 bolt gun, I go to quite a bit of work to get the best I can out of the gun. I am not even close to an expert. Really just learning and enjoying the process of doing so. In other words, read up what the experts have to say, and don't just get caught up in reading the tables and trying to use max loads. Best of luck!
     
  9. zippygaloo

    zippygaloo Oregon Member

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    How many completed cartridges at each powder load would you recommend I make?

    Also, how many shots should I put in a group in order to draw accurate conclusions?
     
  10. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    One shot in the center of the target could be enough. Most consider a minimum to be three with others insisting on 5 shots.

    It's kind of a conundrum. If I shoot one shot and hit the target dead center will I be able to do so with the next? If I get a nice tight group with 5 will the 6th shot be a flier? If one is a Statistician, they may not be satisfied until they have at least 25, 50, or 100 shots to evaluate.

    For me, I use 5 rounds to establish grouping accuracy. For chronograph "statistics" of Average Speed and Mean Absolute Deviation, I go with no less than 25 rounds.

    In the "Real World", when the shot truly counts (not just killing paper) it's often the first shot that's the most important.
     
  11. speedtriple

    speedtriple Vancouver, Washington, United States Member

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    223 Rem + 223 AI Cartridge Guide Here is lots of general information about the .223, including some load data and reasons to load an AR and bolt gun differently.

    Spreadsheet for reloading - LongRangeHunting Online Magazine Here is a link to a spreadsheet that you can input your chronograph data in to get statistical data out of your testing.

    The "data" from a reloading manual is really a point in time. It was that barrel, that day's weather conditions, that batch of powder, that primer, etc. In my .308, moving from one batch of Varget to another can change the load a full grain to maintain velocity. A load that is mild and safe in the cooler months, can get pretty strong in the hotter months, and I often trim a few tenths off my loads in summer.

    I agree with deadshot2. 5 rounds for groups. I usually start with 10 rounds for chronograph statistics, and then expand it when I get to sweet spots.
     
  12. ma96782

    ma96782 Vancouver, WA Well-Known Member

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    There are many online sources for load data information.

    But, I'd buy a manual in addition to the online info. A good manual is a good reference book to have on your desk........READ IT and take heed of the WARNINGS contained therein. In fact, buy several just to cross check things. Besides, sometimes one book may not have load data with the components that you are planning to use, but the other book may have the info.

    For FREE online info (click the links)......
    LOADING DATA

    BUT, it sounds like you're just starting to reload. So, here is my advice to you.............

    Be safe. IMHO.......start with a minimum load and work your way up. NEVER start with a maximum load.

    Aloha, Mark
     
  13. Kevatc

    Kevatc Oregon Well-Known Member

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    Shot literally 4000 rounds or better with 24.0 grains H335 driving a 55 grain FMJBT.
     
  14. deadshot2

    deadshot2 NW Quadrant WA State Well-Known Member

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    You have somewhat of a unique situation here. The 55 gr FMJ-BT With Cannelure is pretty much a "Mil-Spec" bullet. It's short in comparison to the other bullets out there that are either Target or Hunting bullets. It has little bearing surface compared to the longer bullets so the variations in Barrel Friction are little. It's one bullet that can be pretty much loaded up to published SAAMI max with little risk of anything more than accelerated wear on the firearm.

    Remember the published loads are SAAMI which is a bit of a code word for "Lawyer inspired" loads. The military Small Arms manual shows that M-193 rounds contain over 26 grains of WC 844 which is supposed to be the same as H335.

    In other words, load, shoot, and enjoy. The bullet you describe has been "cloned" so many times by others that it's like what happened to the IBM PC.